Anyone remember Tiananmen?

O RLY?

So where is Tank Man then?

And how many Renminbi did his family get billed for the cost of the bullet used to re-edumacate him via Halsschuss?
That is a good question and one that no one really seems to know the answer to. Anything from deliberately faded into obscurity to fled the country to executed is mooted. No one knows.
 
What's to get over? It was just an observation.

One day 'Peking' is the name used for the Chinese capital then the fashion changed and it's 'Beijing'. Seemed to happen roundabout that time.

The tin foil may be getting a little over-heated, as the transition appears to have been underway from at least a decade before Tiananmen due to the recognition of the PRC as 'the real China' rather than the ROC. As governments, international institutions and the MSM (with the apparent exception in the UK of 'The Independent') wanted to cosy up to the CCP, they conformed to the CCP's name for their capital city. The USA, as leader of the West, chose to recognise the PRC as 'the Chinese government' on 1 Jan 1979 and conform to the PRC's spelling and pronunciation of their capital city.

'Starting on March 4, 1958 and continuing to the present, the People’s Republic of China has published a weekly English-language news magazine originally called “Peking Review”, and beginning with issue #1 in 1979 renamed “Beijing Review” after the Pinyin transliteration system was adopted for foreign-language publications.'


'My understanding is that the capital of China was called Peking by European missionaries who either did not know the language well enough or did not deign to pronounce it the way the natives did, Bay-Jing. Throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries China was in a mess (decline of the Qing Dynasty, the Opium War, revolution, invasion by colonial powers, war with Japan, civil war between Nationalists and Communists), hence the country was in no mood to care how westerners mispronounced Chinese place names, nor was it in a position to do anything about it. This situation changed after the mainland government gained recognition by the USA and joined the UN in the 1970s. The Chinese government then insisted that its capital be called Beijing. As the power and prestige of the country grew, the world followed suit.'

'Beijing and Nanjing are the original Chinese names going back many centuries and dynasties. Bei means North and Nan means South. Jing means Capital City. The Chinese royal court was during the summer months in the Nortern capital - Beijing - as the climate was cooler. In the winter they moved to the southern capital ,to Nanjing , to escape the very cold winter in the north. The foreign invaders created a bad transliteration, ending up with Peking and Nanking.'


 
Last edited:
The tin foil may be getting a little over-heated, as the transition appears to have been underway from at least a decade before Tiananmen due to the recognition of the PRC as 'the real China' rather than the ROC. As governments, international institutions and the MSM (with the apparent exception in the UK of 'The Independent') wanted to cosy up to the CCP, they conformed to the CCP's name for their capital city. The USA, as leader of the West, chose to recognise the PRC as 'the Chinese government' on 1 Jan 1979 and conform to the PRC's spelling and pronunciation of their capital city.

'Starting on March 4, 1958 and continuing to the present, the People’s Republic of China has published a weekly English-language news magazine originally called “Peking Review”, and beginning with issue #1 in 1979 renamed “Beijing Review” after the Pinyin transliteration system was adopted for foreign-language publications.'


'My understanding is that the capital of China was called Peking by European missionaries who either did not know the language well enough or did not deign to pronounce it the way the natives did, Bay-Jing. Throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries China was in a mess (decline of the Qing Dynasty, the Opium War, revolution, invasion by colonial powers, war with Japan, civil war between Nationalists and Communists), hence the country was in no mood to care how westerners mispronounced Chinese place names, nor was it in a position to do anything about it. This situation changed after the mainland government gained recognition by the USA and joined the UN in the 1970s. The Chinese government then insisted that its capital be called Beijing. As the power and prestige of the country grew, the world followed suit.'

'Beijing and Nanjing are the original Chinese names going back many centuries and dynasties. Bei means North and Nan means South. Jing means Capital City. The Chinese royal court was during the summer months in the Nortern capital - Beijing - as the climate was cooler. In the winter they moved to the southern capital ,to Nanjing , to escape the very cold winter in the north. The foreign invaders created a bad transliteration, ending up with Peking and Nanking.'


Any time you are dealing with languages that use different alphabets you have transliteration problems. That is, there often are not one to one equivalents of letters in each language. Some languages have more letters than others. Some writing systems aren't even phonetic.

Standard convention is for each country to decide upon its own transliteration system for any writing systems other than their own they can be bothered to provide one for.

This may change from time to time. This for example is why "Kiev" became "Kyiv". The name of the city hasn't changed in Ukrainian, just the system used to transliterate it from the Cyrillic alphabet to the Roman alphabet. You and I are free to continue spelling the name of the city as "Kiev" if we wish, but official government documents and the media will follow the convention as used by the government of that country.
 
My wife remembers the Tienanmen Square incident. She was there. Apparently it was quite frightening.
How many students did she run over in her tank?
 

endure

GCM
"Mai mai mai mai mai"

In Thai that translates to "new wood doesn't burn does it?" because Thai is a tonal language and uses an alphabet that indicates tonality.

I know it's a bit scary being presented with alternative realities but they still exist no matter how tight you close your eyes...
 
"Mai mai mai mai mai"

In Thai that translates to "new wood doesn't burn does it?" because Thai is a tonal language and uses an alphabet that indicates tonality.

I know it's a bit scary being presented with alternative realities but they still exist no matter how tight you close your eyes...
I thought it meant "Wrong hole! Wrong hole! Wrong hole! Wrong hole! Wrong hole!", but that may come down to what part of Thailand you are visiting.
 
"Mai mai mai mai mai"

In Thai that translates to "new wood doesn't burn does it?" because Thai is a tonal language and uses an alphabet that indicates tonality.

I know it's a bit scary being presented with alternative realities but they still exist no matter how tight you close your eyes...
After all these years, could it be that Tom Jones ans Alex Harvey were talking about an altercation with the missus over fire lighting issues? "That wood doesn't burn, does it Delilah?"
 
"Mai mai mai mai mai"

In Thai that translates to "new wood doesn't burn does it?" because Thai is a tonal language and uses an alphabet that indicates tonality.

I know it's a bit scary being presented with alternative realities but they still exist no matter how tight you close your eyes...

Thought it was an ABBA song myself
 

endure

GCM
I thought it meant "Wrong hole! Wrong hole! Wrong hole! Wrong hole! Wrong hole!", but that may come down to what part of Thailand you are visiting.
There's no such thing as 'wrong hole' in Thailand. It's all a matter of the correct remuneration...
 
"Forgotten Weapons" has just published a video talking about Ian's new book on Chinese warlord pistols. This video centres on the difficulties in translating between English and Chinese.

One of the examples they give of the pitfalls of translation is how the title of the American movie "Saving Private Ryan" was translated into Chinese. In most of China and in Taiwan it was translated as literally as possible. That's what they see as being the proper way to translate things.

In Hong Kong however, the movie title was translated more or less as "Saving a Soldier from the Thunder Studded Battle Pits". The likely reason for that is because they just liked the way that sounded in Chinese, and in Hong Kong they're more concerned about it sounding good than in literal accuracy.
 

endure

GCM
"Forgotten Weapons" has just published a video talking about Ian's new book on Chinese warlord pistols. This video centres on the difficulties in translating between English and Chinese.

One of the examples they give of the pitfalls of translation is how the title of the American movie "Saving Private Ryan" was translated into Chinese. In most of China and in Taiwan it was translated as literally as possible. That's what they see as being the proper way to translate things.

In Hong Kong however, the movie title was translated more or less as "Saving a Soldier from the Thunder Studded Battle Pits". The likely reason for that is because they just liked the way that sounded in Chinese, and in Hong Kong they're more concerned about it sounding good than in literal accuracy.

Who wouldn't want to see a movie called "Saving a Soldier from the Thunder Studded Battle Pits".

I certainly would.
 
Top