Anyone remember Ploce camp in croatia in 95

#2
when? for the limb-breaking tent erection in strong winds? the heart attack on a run? or the overflowing sewage into the fresh water supply?

don't remember any of it :)
 
#6
Stealing pallets from wherever you could find them to keep your cot above the water line.

Stealing the Croats flag to see if it pissed them off.

Cursing the RE for building the camp on a flood plain.

Great days. :roll:
 
#7
yep...remember it well. Funniest site was watching a guy kayak from his tent to where he was working....think we got moved out not long after.
 
#8
I remember seeing the toilets rise out of the ground before toppling over spilling their contents into the lake that was supposed to be the camp.

Were'nt there a couple of cases of dysentry shortly after ?

Nice couple nights in a hotel though.
 
#9
Cardboard became currency, not enough grub, i hammered in every tent spike of that fukc off slop jockey marque, remember the newsletter that was published back home describing the "dining as delightfully alfresco",

iron man cattle shed showers full of rats, filling sandbags and that nob of an SSM who described the locals as MFI, wading through your own faeces and being asked to show your morphine and pencil on demand, going up to Dole camp was a lot better. anyone else out there from the old Oscar troop , 21 sigs, those were the days.
 
#10
I was there with 210 sig sqn working in the qm's. That sloppy marquee didn't half go during that storm. We were lucky as our camp was not really affected by the flooding. Hard work and a good laugh but i was well pleased to leave the place. :elephant:
 
#11
iamaviking said:
Cardboard became currency, not enough grub, i hammered in every tent spike of that fukc off slop jockey marque, remember the newsletter that was published back home describing the "dining as delightfully alfresco",

iron man cattle shed showers full of rats, filling sandbags and that nob of an SSM who described the locals as MFI, wading through your own faeces and being asked to show your morphine and pencil on demand, going up to Dole camp was a lot better. anyone else out there from the old Oscar troop , 21 sigs, those were the days.

I was in Oscar Tp, 220 Sig Sqn....good to see there are still others around from Laarbruch who remember this tour. Still, the 6 weeks in Bath prior to deploying was bloody awesome!!!
 
#12
toytrain-driver said:
Were You at Ploce Death camp with the U.N.?
No but I recovered 24 Airmobile from it as things changed to NATO.

God-awful place and an object lesson in how things have improved on operations in the past few years. The only ray of sunshine is at least we were there legally... :crazy:
 
#13
The_Rookie said:
iamaviking said:
Cardboard became currency, not enough grub, i hammered in every tent spike of that fukc off slop jockey marque, remember the newsletter that was published back home describing the "dining as delightfully alfresco",

iron man cattle shed showers full of rats, filling sandbags and that nob of an SSM who described the locals as MFI, wading through your own faeces and being asked to show your morphine and pencil on demand, going up to Dole camp was a lot better. anyone else out there from the old Oscar troop , 21 sigs, those were the days.

I was in Oscar Tp, 220 Sig Sqn....good to see there are still others around from Laarbruch who remember this tour. Still, the 6 weeks in Bath prior to deploying was bloody awesome!!!
I was with 244 Sig Sqn, indeed it was an awesome 6 weeks. Bloody expensive though. Got my first overdraft for it.
 
#14
sc_obvious said:
The_Rookie said:
iamaviking said:
Cardboard became currency, not enough grub, i hammered in every tent spike of that fukc off slop jockey marque, remember the newsletter that was published back home describing the "dining as delightfully alfresco",

iron man cattle shed showers full of rats, filling sandbags and that nob of an SSM who described the locals as MFI, wading through your own faeces and being asked to show your morphine and pencil on demand, going up to Dole camp was a lot better. anyone else out there from the old Oscar troop , 21 sigs, those were the days.

I was in Oscar Tp, 220 Sig Sqn....good to see there are still others around from Laarbruch who remember this tour. Still, the 6 weeks in Bath prior to deploying was bloody awesome!!!
I was with 244 Sig Sqn, indeed it was an awesome 6 weeks. Bloody expensive though. Got my first overdraft for it.
No but I remember being stuck back in Colerne and finding out that one of our techs got caught trying to nick a Puma
Alpha Troop so I'll keep quiet pmsl
 
#15
I was there with 2 Sigs when the CO had taken the entire Regt and had to send half back as they were never needed.
Having a shower in a cattle market shed, then walking back to your tent and being covered in down wash by a Puma.
Having my wagon located right next to the French compound and smelling greasy, garlic ridden french s***e from their cooks trailer.
Getting cooled off in the fire water butts next to the tents.
Having to listen to a certain female techs whinging about discrimination (most people will know who I mean) for single parents, then slagging her off to her ex husband (who I did not know was at the time) in the departures at Split Airport.
Fecking hated the place and thought all future tours would be the same at the time!!
 
#17
Oh i remember it well, got sent there 6mths before i was due to be discharged - what a waste of a month, didnt even get a medal man and it screwed up my resettlement too. I was there with 210sigs, oh the mess tent, how it leaked and oh what great fun putting that up - twice. Did the run to Split a few times and took full advantage of the dutch hospitality - dont like Heinken any more :p
 
#19
Ploče Winds

MET said the wind would be high that night
airframes would need tie downs
Two thousands troops in the tented camp
were going to be blown around.

The sound of ratchets and sledge hammers
was a common theme that day;
as teams of sweating soldiers
toiled to square the camp away.

The tents were lashed inside and out
and nailed to the ground
with two foot long metal spikes
So they’d not be tossed around.

The girls in the tent next to us
were working on their tans;
we offered to assist them
but that wasn’t in their plans.

That night’s storm was vengeful
it hit hard and lasted long
and from the tent next to ours
came a noise most forlorn.

As four bronzed ladies struggled,
to bang stakes into the ground,
to stop their tent taking off
leaving them half drowned.

To venture out was lethal
as sharp debris flew around.
The generator kept failing,
and cables sparked upon the ground.

A sentry had his arm shattered
as he patrolled the camp that night.
The church had broken loose
and it hit him in full flight.

The cook house, a large big top,
was rent from floor to ceiling
its wooden posts were split in two
and through the air sent reeling.

The camp latrine made quite a mess
as the tanks bobbed from the ground
then tipped their fetid contents
into the water flowing round.

Things got very lively
as we fought against that storm
and kept our kit above the flood
whilst holding canvas down.


A hurricane lamp fell to the floor
and everything went pitch black,
the scent of kero on the wind
caused a mild anxiety attack.

Howling wind, lighting flash
driving rain and thunder
flapping canvas, shorting cables
and now the fear of fire.

That night lasted an eternity -
dawn bought an eerie calm
over the stinking cess pool
which our home had become.

The cooks’ stoves were under water
which meant it was three foot deep.
It also made them hard to light
So breakfast was real bleak.

While the water subsided
we broke out the canoes
to keep tired and hungry troops busy
and stop them blowing a fuse.

As soon as we were able
the clear up began full tilt
but it was several days before
the camp was totally rebuilt.

The storm was not the only one
that we endured that summer.
It left its mark upon that camp
Oh and what a bummer.

The camp had been called Red Dwarf
before the first storm hit,
but the troops re-named it‘Ploce Death Camp’
after it had been covered in shit.

Now, if you’re planning on camping
I have some tips for you
they were learnt the hard way
but, they come free to you.

Listen to the Met man’s forecast.
Build cess pits above the water table.
Shelter comes before the tan.
In high wind even churches fly.

But, perhaps the most important
The lesson I’d heed most
take this seasoned camper’s advice
and - Book into a hotel.

John Carré Buchanan
21 September 2012
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top