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Anyone met this utter cumper yet?

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Only knew about that because I lived in Chorleywood and used to walk past the place where it was invented often.
85 Supply depot/Rochdale Barracks in Bielefeld. Dad used to have a couple of loaves fall into his hands on a regular basis from the bakery there. Much nicer than NAAFI bread.

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85 Supply depot/Rochdale Barracks in Bielefeld. Dad used to have a couple of loaves fall into his hands on a regular basis from the bakery there. Much nicer than NAAFI bread.

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Likewise my old man when he was chief bean counter clerk in the supply depot in Singapore and then later when he was the WO1 Cdr in Dhekelia.

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Dit Aden back in the 60's: The brown skinned gentlemen shooting and throwing grenades at us murdered the Brit civvy bloke who was running the bakery for the whole of Aden. Shortly after his demise military personnel started to find glass, nails and razor blades in their loaves. It suddenly became very fashionable for the wives to learn to bake.
 
A conductor? A copper, then :)
The honorable and ancient appointment of Conductor bestowed upon WO1’s. off the top of my head the criteria for appointment was: To have served 3 years as a WO1, to still have a minimum of 3 years left to serve, no detected crimes, and only given to 1% (might have been 10%) of serving RAOC WO1’s at any time So that there were only ever 30, or 40 of them knocking around.

The tale I remember as to the establishment of the appointment was that it came about in India. Convoys were being ambushed and troops killed, likewise trains. One of the duties of officers was to act as OC train, particularly ammunition trains which were favourite targets. Having paid for their commissions In a nice safe RAOC they did not particularly want to die for them so they created an appointment which lifted selected RAOC WO1’s to a higher level Where they could act as an OC. And, being as the appointment was created to manage trains they called the appointment Conductor. As in, ”what are you up to today Bill”? “I’m playing at fcuking conductor to cover for that shirking coward Lt. Smythe -Higginton“.

I don’t know about nowadays, but back in the days of the RAOC if there was one around they were probably the best specialist practical adviser a Col., or 1 star cculd have. The JHQ Supply Directorate Brig used to call them in for chats with coffee and biscuits regularly.
 
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My friend dated him, while he lived in Manchester, he had a close protection company that transported assets, important people. Robbie Williams is his best friend does all his gigs. Just saw an advert for the veterans lottery the guy holding up the card looks like him in real life.
My friend believed him and he took her for a ride big style.
Hes a knob head

He certainly did.

Her fanny looked like a drop kicked pumpkin when he'd finished with the whore.
 
The honorable and ancient appointment of Conductor bestowed upon WO1’s. off the top of my head the criteria for appointment was: To have served 3 years as a WO1, to still have a minimum of 3 years left to serve, no detected crimes, and only given to 1% (might have been 10%) of serving RAOC WO1’s at any time So that there were only ever 30, or 40 of them knocking around.

The tale I remember as to the establishment of the appointment was that it came about in India. Convoys were being ambushed and troops killed, likewise trains. One of the duties of officers was to act as OC train, particularly ammunition trains which were favourite targets. Having paid for their commissions In a nice safe RAOC they did not particularly want to die for them so they created an appointment which lifted selected RAOC WO1’s to a higher level Where they could act as an OC. And, being as the appointment was created to manage trains they called the appointment Conductor. As in, ”what are you up to today Bill”? “I’m playing at fcuking conductor to cover for that shirking coward Lt. Smythe -Higginton“.

I don’t know about nowadays, but back in the days of the RAOC if there was one around they were probably the best specialist practical adviser a Col., or 1 star cculd have. The JHQ Supply Directorate Brig used to call them in for chats with coffee and biscuits regularly.
I escorted some personnel back on civilian flight from Honq Kong in the early 1990s and was referred to as the 'Conducting Officer'' by the RLC and RAF Movements staff.
 
The honorable and ancient appointment of Conductor bestowed upon WO1’s. off the top of my head the criteria for appointment was: To have served 3 years as a WO1, to still have a minimum of 3 years left to serve, no detected crimes, and only given to 1% (might have been 10%) of serving RAOC WO1’s at any time So that there were only ever 30, or 40 of them knocking around.

The tale I remember as to the establishment of the appointment was that it came about in India. Convoys were being ambushed and troops killed, likewise trains. One of the duties of officers was to act as OC train, particularly ammunition trains which were favourite targets. Having paid for their commissions In a nice safe RAOC they did not particularly want to die for them so they created an appointment which lifted selected RAOC WO1’s to a higher level Where they could act as an OC. And, being as the appointment was created to manage trains they called the appointment Conductor. As in, ”what are you up to today Bill”? “I’m playing at fcuking conductor to cover for that shirking coward Lt. Smythe -Higginton“.

I don’t know about nowadays, but back in the days of the RAOC if there was one around they were probably the best specialist practical adviser a Col., or 1 star cculd have. The JHQ Supply Directorate Brig used to call them in for chats with coffee and biscuits regularly.
My experience of RLC WO1s is that they know the book inside out, ask them to provide a solution outside of published guidance they might as well be RAF Warrant Officers.
 

Fire4effect

Old-Salt
The honorable and ancient appointment of Conductor bestowed upon WO1’s. off the top of my head the criteria for appointment was: To have served 3 years as a WO1, to still have a minimum of 3 years left to serve, no detected crimes, and only given to 1% (might have been 10%) of serving RAOC WO1’s at any time So that there were only ever 30, or 40 of them knocking around.

The tale I remember as to the establishment of the appointment was that it came about in India. Convoys were being ambushed and troops killed, likewise trains. One of the duties of officers was to act as OC train, particularly ammunition trains which were favourite targets. Having paid for their commissions In a nice safe RAOC they did not particularly want to die for them so they created an appointment which lifted selected RAOC WO1’s to a higher level Where they could act as an OC. And, being as the appointment was created to manage trains they called the appointment Conductor. As in, ”what are you up to today Bill”? “I’m playing at fcuking conductor to cover for that shirking coward Lt. Smythe -Higginton“.

I don’t know about nowadays, but back in the days of the RAOC if there was one around they were probably the best specialist practical adviser a Col., or 1 star cculd have. The JHQ Supply Directorate Brig used to call them in for chats with coffee and biscuits regularly.

My Dad was one in the mid 70s, HQ 4 Div at Hereford. Right hand man to CRAOC before getting his commission.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
My Dad was one in the mid 70s, HQ 4 Div at Hereford. Right hand man to CRAOC before getting his commission.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

My old man got his in around '75 and was similarly the right hand man to CRAOC in Cyprus.

This man was my CRAOC, an utter gentleman endowed with more commonsense than most. I don't know many LtCols who would have had a LCpl, and others, in their office regularly (with coffee) to ask them how the state of play was on the ground and what the blokes were thinking and feeling. Not just me, he used to way lay other regular visitors to Supply Directorate and keep his finger on the pulse by making sure he knew what was going on everywhere.

 
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Fire4effect

Old-Salt
My old man got his in around '75 and was similarly the right hand man to CRAOC in Cyprus.

This man was my CRAOC, an utter gentleman endowed with more commonsense than most. I don't know many LtCols who would have had a LCpl, and others, in their office regularly (with coffee) to ask them how the state of play was on the ground and what the blokes were thinking and feeling. Not just me, he used to way lay other regular visitors to Supply Directorate and keep his finger on the pulse by making sure he knew what was going on everywhere.


Similarly my Dad was National Service too and stayed on, served 56-93, Conductor RAOC 74, commissioned in 78 and finishing as Lt Col. Discharged to a better place in 2014.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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