Anyone met this utter cumper yet?

No! the best Corps in the army was the RAOC until it ended up in the catch- all RLC, a black day in military history :eek:
Didn't they make the bread that was suitable* for use as a roofing material? I understand the stuff we refused to try and eat is now painted green and used for body armour plates



* Not generally suitable for eating though
 

woger wabbit

War Hero
Didn't they make the bread that was suitable* for use as a roofing material? I understand the stuff we refused to try and eat is now painted green and used for body armour plates



* Not generally suitable for eating though
Had you ever eaten it you would know it was of the highest quality
 
Had you ever eaten it you would know it was of the highest quality
While I was present during parties where people consumed it, I never digested any.
 

Robme

On ROPS
On ROPs
No! the best Corps in the army was the RAOC until it ended up in the catch- all RLC, a black day in military history :eek:
Dad was RAOC, became a conductor and nothing to do with music
 

Robme

On ROPS
On ROPs
We had one at 10 sigs Conductor B***K, was it him? 1973-6
No he left the Army in Feb 1973, so unlikely. Although in his early days, post WW2 he was called Bxxxk Jxxk. But that was during his Indian Army service. Not sure to many called him that during his Army service, just Yes Sir or Barsteward. He used to make me and my siblings line up every morning M-F to make sure we were wearing pressed school kit, that our shoes were shined etc. And that was when we had to sort our kit out , so we were ironing at 9 years old and for a lot of Dads service we had maids. Cruel and Wicked some might say, but not me, life affirming, but not at the time.
On the positive side, camping for my dad, when we lived in the Far East, was jungle trips and eventually my brother and me used to take ourselves off into the Jungle on our own during the long holiday. And as we were Army Barmy, he used to bring home SAS Soldiers for Sunday nose-bag etc, and they used to fill our heads with war stories and show us bits of ‘leather’ claiming them to be CTs ears, well I think they were bits of leather .
 

woger wabbit

War Hero
No he left the Army in Feb 1973, so unlikely. Although in his early days, post WW2 he was called Bxxxk Jxxk. But that was during his Indian Army service. Not sure to many called him that during his Army service, just Yes Sir or Barsteward. He used to make me and my siblings line up every morning M-F to make sure we were wearing pressed school kit, that our shoes were shined etc. And that was when we had to sort our kit out , so we were ironing at 9 years old and for a lot of Dads service we had maids. Cruel and Wicked some might say, but not me, life affirming, but not at the time.
On the positive side, camping for my dad, when we lived in the Far East, was jungle trips and eventually my brother and me used to take ourselves off into the Jungle on our own during the long holiday. And as we were Army Barmy, he used to bring home SAS Soldiers for Sunday nose-bag etc, and they used to fill our heads with war stories and show us bits of ‘leather’ claiming them to be CTs ears, well I think they were bits of leather .
Priceless
 
Delusions of Grandeur seems to have passed into everyday language but Doctor Wiki tells me that it can be a real medical state brought about by a number of conditions;

Life was a lot simpler when the asylums just had their share of Napoleons.
Link:
Delusions of grandeur
Types of delusions of grandeur
Any delusion has four main characteristics:
  1. The person having the belief believes it to be true, even when the existing norm and other people know it to be untrue.
  2. The person having the delusion will not listen to any other viewpoints about the belief and will not consider change when evidence challenges the delusion.
  3. The content of the delusion is impossible or implausible.
  4. The delusion impacts the person’s daily life.
 
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Delusions of Grandeur seems to have passed into everyday language but Doctor Wiki tells me that it can be a real medical state brought about by a number of conditions;

Life was a lot simpler when the asylums just had their share of Napoleons.
Link:
Delusions of grandeur
Types of delusions of grandeur
Any delusion has four main characteristics:
  1. The person having the belief believes it to be true, even when the existing norm and other people know it to be untrue.
  2. The person having the delusion will not listen to any other viewpoints about the belief and will not consider change when evidence challenges the delusion.
  3. The content of the delusion is impossible or implausible.
  4. The delusion impacts the person’s daily life.
Calling @History_Man
 
The bread was issued to units as part of their fresh rations, so which parties were you attending to eat purloined bread may I ask?? :rolleyes:
Fresh is a strong term.

And purloined? It walked there of it's own accord
 
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If you had served you would know what fresh rations were, (vegies, fresh meat etc.,, yes and bread ) and no you never tried the bread or you would know how very good the quality was and baked fresh every day.
Even for Chorleywood method it was crap.
 
Always found RAOC bread in BAOR pretty good, always went well with all in stew or those egg banjos at 3 in the morning.
 

ColdWarWorrier

Old-Salt
If you had served you would know what fresh rations were, (vegies, fresh meat etc.,, yes and bread ) and no you never tried the bread or you would know how very good the quality was and baked fresh every day.
I think RAOC bread deserves its own thread (if it hasn’t already got one - I can’t be arrsed looking).

I could never work out the system of days on the wrappers. Was it the day it was baked? Or an ‘eat by’ recommendation?

If you got Tuesday bread on a Thursday was it two days old or suitable for eating until the following Monday? I remember being told both by slop jockeys.

I also never met anyone who claimed to be an RAOC baker. Were they indeed RAOC? Or did the ACC do the baking and the RAOC did the distribution?

Sorry for the thread drift.
 
If you had served you would know what fresh rations were, (vegies, fresh meat etc.,, yes and bread ) and no you never tried the bread or you would know how very good the quality was and baked fresh every day.
I don't doubt it was baked fresh every day, however on arrival at a unit it would appear to have been stored for some time after being baked.
Days were mentioned, not the week, month or year.

Bread should not snap or shatter. It shouldn't be possible to threaten someone with a sharpened cheese sandwich.
 

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