Anyone in to Wild Camping

I have been wild camping for 35 years or so and only twice has a landowner asked me to move on and on both occasions the offer of a fiver and the promise there will be no trace of my being there and they left me alone for the night. Your mileage may well vary of course but if you are polite enough and follow a few golden rules then all good.

1. Set up late and break camp early
2. Camp away from established footpaths and trails
3. Leave no traces that you were there
 
I've got a bivvi bag and have used it for camping a few times. Likewise I've spent a couple of nights under a tarp.

Given my tent is lighter, packs slightly smaller, stops mozzies biting me and gives me somewhere to get changed while staying dry I can't see the attraction in making things more unpleasant personally.

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Morning @Ortholith,
I use varying combinations of bivybag or 'Hilleberg" Bivanorac*, tarp, mos'., net., 'Hennessy Hammock' or tent. Either 1/ 2 man, depends on what, where, when.
Just wondering which tent you use?

*Tend to use this a lot when light-weight roughing it. Excellent bit of kit
 

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Also the Sierra Nevada area Andalusia is exceptional for roughing it, cheap flights into Malaga and then off into the mountains, I don’t recommend this alone though and you should always report you intended routes and stop overs to the authorities!
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I got a return fight last week for £57.00 , some amazing walking and wild areas out there , just watch out for Seprona if you are dodgy camping .
 
You could get a decent second hand caravan for £1800 , seriously though £1800 for a 2 man `kin tent !, it does seem to be a case of fools and money being easily parted .
Exactly. Value for money seems to increase rapidly at first, then tails off and gets non-existent past about 400 quid.

Pay 10 quid and you get something that is likely to leak or break first time out. 60 quid and it's probably OK but a bit heavy. 300 quid and it's about as good as it's going to get. Anything after that is almost certainly a massive waste of money.

Same company, same tent design, you can spend £180 for a 1.6kg version, £400 for a 1kg version or £1,000 for a 0.5kg version. I forked out a bit of cash, got the £400 version in a sale for about £220 and am more than happy.
 
Exactly. Value for money seems to increase rapidly at first, then tails off and gets non-existent past about 400 quid.

Pay 10 quid and you get something that is likely to leak or break first time out. 60 quid and it's probably OK but a bit heavy. 300 quid and it's about as good as it's going to get. Anything after that is almost certainly a massive waste of money.

Same company, same tent design, you can spend £180 for a 1.6kg version, £400 for a 1kg version or £1,000 for a 0.5kg version. I
Cheaper to lose weight before you go.
 
Morning @Ortholith,
I use varying combinations of bivybag or 'Hilleberg" Bivanorac*, tarp, mos'., net., 'Hennessy Hammock' or tent. Either 1/ 2 man, depends on what, where, when.
Just wondering which tent you use?

*Tend to use this a lot when light-weight roughing it. Excellent bit of kit
Main tent is this one - Laser Competition 1 Tent - Terra Nova Equipment although, like rucksacks and sleeping bags, I have more than I need and really should get rid of some of them.

Cheaper to lose weight before you go.
Exactly. I reached that conclusion when I saw the price of the seriously lightweight kit. Much cheaper just to lay off the beer and kebabs.
 

auggie rock

Old-Salt
I have done this many times but wouldn't recommend going with the kids or anyone who doesn't share your minimalist approach. Although wild camping is not really allowed in England I would echo the advice above - pitch late, leave early, hard routine in terms of fires, light and noise, and leave no trace. I also agree that the best way to do it is by following a river by canoe. Plenty of pubs and village shops along the route if you need/want them and always a deserted and beautiful spot to overnight. I tend to just use a bivvy bag and sleeping bag, and have a tarp on hand if needed.
 
Although I haven't bought their camping gear I have been impressed by these people, very understanding if it doesn't come up to scratch.
Quite a range and not silly prices.
 
When I was younger I did this a few times, dartmoor, the lakes etc. As they said keep yourself to yourself and be sensible will be fine. I believe @Dwarf did a European trek some years back.
 
Although I haven't bought their camping gear I have been impressed by these people, very understanding if it doesn't come up to scratch.
Quite a range and not silly prices.
I really rate Alpkit, both for the gear and their customer service. A lot of their equipment is rebranded designs (I just got a compass in the sale that's identical to a Silva Expedition 4, even down to the spots for rubber feet on the baseplate which they haven't put on) but it works. I say that sat here wearing one of their merino t shirts and a pair of their woolly socks.

On the customer service, I bought a jacket from them about 2 years ago. It arrived, I never did anything with it and found it while tidying a cupboard this summer. Sent it back to them with a note asking for an exchange and they refunded me the cost of the jacket to my bank account. I promptly spent that on a new cold weather sleeping bag.
 

Poppy

LE
I got a call to a grassed area by the waterfront - a report of a 'homeless person, may be unwell'. It was early morning and I approached the bivvy bag with characteristic bergan bulge at the head. Distinctly squaddy like. I give what I thought was a shoulder a shove with a cheery 'awrite, mate?' [this being one of those occasions where I deemed Mate the correct form of address]. The figure that emerged was a bearded bloke who informed me he'd been walking the coastal path but had misjudged his distance the previous day and had bivvied up in the dark. All he wanted was directions to the nearest shop for some milk for his brew. We went on our separate ways and I was very envious of him.
 
Although I haven't bought their camping gear I have been impressed by these people, very understanding if it doesn't come up to scratch.
Quite a range and not silly prices.
Probably the best outdoors company I've ever dealt with. Not a day goes by without using something bought from Alpkit.

I've hammocked on Dartmoor, a couple of climbing nuts and slings to hook into rocks. Tarp & bugnet for comfort.

My favourite tent is the Vango Halo 300 is great for comfort and withstands horrendous weather, but it's just a little too heavy.

There is a campsite in North Devon called Hole Station that gets you as close to wild camping but with some facilities. Greg lends you a wheelbarrow to take your gear from the carpark to your pitch in the woods. Each pitch consists of a tarp shelter, wheel log burner and anti squirrel storage (filing cabinet).

The pitches are so big, you may not even see your neighbours through the woods. Last time we went, the kids had tents by the burner, SWMBO & I had hammocks and tarps amongst the trees. Composting toilet, shower and a cooked breakfast are 5 minutes away.

Sent from my neocore_E1R1 using Tapatalk
 
Gents,
As the title suggests are any of you in to wild camping? And if so; have you got any recommendations on good places to camp. Perhaps you even take your kids camping with you?
Or are you on of them blokes who miss the days of kipping out in the open since leaving the mob (like me), and want to get back in to it?
I was thinking of maybe doing a week or so, next march, whilst walking the South Downs Way.
Anyone up for a discussion on this topic?

Edited to add: Maybe the use of the words 'wild camping' in the title of this thread is making me sound like a bit of a bell end or something. The point being I'm interested to see whether anyone on here regularly 'camps out' (for want of better terminology).
Two miles south of Conwy Tal Y Fan, walk from crows farm to pass (500yards aprox) two mile south, two ponds, camp there, fresh water loads of burnt Gorse Bush for cooking
 
I do hope that you've disabled the webcam on your computer.
Since you've asked, the Ortholith collection du jour is Alpkit merino t shirt, Helly Hansen merino shirt thing and school trip hoody. Paired with softie trousers, Alpkit woolly socks and Lowa desert boots.

I might look like a well educated tramp but I'm warm :)
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Cheaper to lose weight before you go.
Doesn't really work like that - the generally accepted civvie limit is 30% of your body mass, so in theory if your normally weigh 100kg, then 30kg is your max bergen weight, it's more to do with balance and energy storage / consumption than it is to do with total combined mass.
A mate of mine worked in a specialist cycle shop for a while, he was selling lightweight brake levers (titanium) and other cr@p for stupid money, when in reality they'd save more weight and cash just by having a decent dump before they went out
 
I got a call to a grassed area by the waterfront - a report of a 'homeless person, may be unwell'. It was early morning and I approached the bivvy bag with characteristic bergan bulge at the head. Distinctly squaddy like. I give what I thought was a shoulder a shove with a cheery 'awrite, mate?' [this being one of those occasions where I deemed Mate the correct form of address]. The figure that emerged was a bearded bloke who informed me he'd been walking the coastal path but had misjudged his distance the previous day and had bivvied up in the dark. All he wanted was directions to the nearest shop for some milk for his brew. We went on our separate ways and I was very envious of him.
Not wild camping as such but I was once woken up by a paramedic after a night out as a student. Lost my keys on the way home, decided in my drunken state to just doss down out of sight of the road and I'd go to the rental agent in the morning to get a replacement key.

I didn't count on the occupant of the ground floor flat seeing me, assuming I was dead and calling an ambulance. Nice people, after a quick explanation they called me an idiot and I staggered off to get breakfast and the replacement key.
 
Doesn't really work like that - the generally accepted civvie limit is 30% of your body mass, so in theory if your normally weigh 100kg, then 30kg is your max bergen weight, it's more to do with balance and energy storage / consumption than it is to do with total combined mass.
A mate of mine worked in a specialist cycle shop for a while, he was selling lightweight brake levers (titanium) and other cr@p for stupid money, when in reality they'd save more weight and cash just by having a decent dump before they went out
Your theory assumes the one carrying the load is the correct weight , a fact hunt of 200kgs would not get far with 60kgs on his back.
 
Doesn't really work like that - the generally accepted civvie limit is 30% of your body mass, so in theory if your normally weigh 100kg, then 30kg is your max bergen weight, it's more to do with balance and energy storage / consumption than it is to do with total combined mass.
'Limit' is probably the wrong word, 'ideal maximum' is closer. I've run DofE expeditions with 40kg girls carrying 18kg packs and they managed. Lots of emails from concerned parents about how the kids wouldn't be able to cope and the realities of an unsupported expedition explained to them. Suddenly the reason why I insisted on mixed gender groups became obvious as the boys can act as pack mules.

Personally 20kg is a sensible upper end for recreational walking, anything beyond that and it removes the 'fun' aspect of walking. Ideally 12kg or less.

Your theory assumes the one carrying the load is the correct weight , a fact hunt of 200kgs would not get far with 60kgs on his back.
Same as BMI, it works fine for the average person but if you are an outlier then it's useless. A fit teenager can carry half their body weight without issue.
 

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