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Anyone in to Wild Camping

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
i carry more stuff for my hound than for myself. He is a short haired lurcher- whippet collie cross 19.5kgs . He will run walk forever but has no body fat so need coat for him if it gets cold/wet, loads of water if its hot. He eats lots of food when we are on the hills to replace energy. On the plus side lots of fresh meat -rabbits and he has also takes Pheasants so have to be wary of game keepers .
They carried their own food, rain jacket, folding bowl & 0.5l of water - all the other stuff of theirs, we carried.....
2 x Snugpak XL jungle blankets, 2 x tea towels for getting the bulk of any water off them (no-one wants a damp GSD in their tent...) fleece dog coat for the Ridgeback, leads, collar lights, med. pack, extra water.
I increased their food by about 30% overall, the Ridgeback is very prey-aware and chased down quite a few unseen (by me & the GSD) rodents, she came back chewing the remnants of something with a furry tail on more than one occasion - no Red Squirrels though!
 

pinback2001

RIP
RIP
When my GSD was alive, we used to walk in the Yair Forest. Turbo had his own sources of drinking water figured out, but we hit a spell of very hot dry weather, and all streams and pools were dry.
We were tramping up the hill one day and encountered a man sitting by the trackside with a large dog lying panting next to him. He was very grateful when I unpacked a 2l bottle of water and Turbo's bowl from (my!) backpack and supplied the poor hound with a drink.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Couple of bergens at a good price if anyone is interested


 
I am blessed really, I can walk from my front door to Lopwell dam, follow the Tavy to the Walkham at double waters and onto Dartmoor without turning a key in an ignition. About 6 miles to the high moor. Don't do it nearly enough. I drive through Denham bridge every day on my way to work and think more about people's inability to reverse than enjoying the beauty of the route...sad.
 
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OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Enjoy what you have, you never know how long you'll have it for.
 
Enjoy what you have, you never know how long you'll have it for.
True enough, I am in fairly good nick at 62 for which I am thankful, a diet of nicotine, lard and booze will catch up eventually I am sure, that is If it doesn't pickle me for longevity.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
A good life well lived - who wouldn't be happy with that?
I'm on furlough again, every day I get to take the dogs out into some woodland not too far away. Every time I go there I see different things, hear different sounds, see nature changing. It makes me want to go back again & again, it's never the same or boring. I like to push the boundaries of where I can go and what I can do but it's nice to be somewhere I know like the back of my hand and take in the sights and sounds of things that are familiar but changing according to the seasons.
 
First dry day l get I will be making charcloth, then off down to the woods for a bit of birchbark. I have my own pine tree so okay for a cuppa, no need to get fed up,
 
A good life well lived - who wouldn't be happy with that?
I'm on furlough again, every day I get to take the dogs out into some woodland not too far away. Every time I go there I see different things, hear different sounds, see nature changing. It makes me want to go back again & again, it's never the same or boring. I like to push the boundaries of where I can go and what I can do but it's nice to be somewhere I know like the back of my hand and take in the sights and sounds of things that are familiar but changing according to the seasons.
That is it, I am back living where i grew up. Very rural area of West Devon, I walk the same paths and woods I did 50 years ago and the similarity is comforting as well as instructive. There are rings of stones where youngsters are camping out down in Calstock woods just like I did back in the 70's and still doing it now....good kids as well...their parents are just a bit older than my own kids and I know them all.
 
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That is it, I am back living where i grew up. Very rural area of West Devon, I walk the same paths and woods I did 50 years ago and the similarity is comforting as well as instructive. There are rings of stones where youngsters are camping out down in Calstock woods just like I did back in the 70's and still doing it now....good kids as well...their parents are just a bit older than my own kids and I know them all.
A beautiful part of the world.

My old man used to live nearby in St. Dominick and I always loved walking in the woods around his place.

A piece of trivia for you, in the South West where you find a stock you quite often find a ton, such as Calstock/Callington or Plymstock/Plympton.

Back in the mists of time, the ton was where the community mostly lived but the stock would be where the livestock were kept, frequently found near water.

Eventually they would grow into separate communities.
 
I am blessed really, I can walk from my front door to Lopwell dam, follow the Tavy to the Walkham at double waters and onto Dartmoor without turning a key in an ignition. About 6 miles to the high moor. Don't do it nearly enough. I drive through Denham bridge every day on my way to work and think more about people's inability to reverse than enjoying the beauty of the route...sad.
I used to live at Moorhaven Village. You can imagine how fecking excellent that was.
 

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