Anyone in to Wild Camping

Brother in law used to do it using a kayak. Paddle all day then find a suitable spot to kip at night.
Kit carried by the kayak including beers.
The Loire area in France is good for that, take a canadian open canoe down the river, prop it up near the bank at night and you can sleep under the canoe, that's proper wild camping
 
That's how I intend to roll mate. Sod lumping a 25kg + bergan about nowadays.
If it's not likely to rain you can forgo the tent even in winter if you get one of those sleeping bags with the aluminium lining in the middle, it warms you up using your own body heat.

If anything they'll keep you too warm in the winter in the UK unless you're going up in the mountains
 
I kayaked down glen finnan with a mate and spent a few days there, didn’t think of getting kayak fit and set off with a crate of Stella, fishing gear, petrol, lamps and many other things I wouldn’t dream of taking if wild camping on foot.

Slight headwinds and I was completely fucked in 30 minutes and there was still public access to a salmon farm (not that far).

I rested and carried on for a few more hours but was completely knackered, my arms shacking like noodles, found a beach and said this is ******* wild enough for me and stayed there for 2 days.

Original plan was to row to the other end and back!
 
I dont think wild camping is allowed in England other than on Dartmoor , not that it would stop me doing it , leave no more than foot prints and I cant see an issue, if you go for a crap bury it , I`d be careful where I had a small fire though.
I understand wild camping in Porridgewoglandia is legal almost anywhere , guess thats how they get away with sleeping in parks , hedgerows and streets on the way home from the pub....every night.
 
Tent.
Bivvi bag and a roll mat.
I've got a bivvi bag and have used it for camping a few times. Likewise I've spent a couple of nights under a tarp.

Given my tent is lighter, packs slightly smaller, stops mozzies biting me and gives me somewhere to get changed while staying dry I can't see the attraction in making things more unpleasant personally.

beacons morning.jpg
 
I've got a bivvi bag and have used it for camping a few times. Likewise I've spent a couple of nights under a tarp.

Given my tent is lighter, packs slightly smaller, stops mozzie biting me and gives me somewhere to get changed while staying dry I can't see the attraction in making things more unpleasant personally.

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I'm gonna try out a hooped bivvy bag when I try out the South Downs Way mate.
 
I dont think wild camping is allowed in England other than on Dartmoor , not that it would stop me doing it , leave no more than foot prints and I cant see an issue, if you go for a crap bury it , I`d be careful where I had a small fire though.
I've never had any issues. Providing you set up around dusk and bugger off when it gets light, bury any shit and take rubbish away there's no issue. I wouldn't go lighting a fire though.

I have had some odd looks from dog walkers who aren't used to some nutter hanging about in a hammock but most just say good morning before wandering off muttering about the loony.
 
I've never had any issues. Providing you set up around dusk and bugger off when it gets light, bury any shit and take rubbish away there's no issue. I wouldn't go lighting a fire though.

I have had some odd looks from dog walkers who aren't used to some nutter hanging about in a hammock but most just say good morning before wandering off muttering about the loony.
I'd just like to try kipping out after a long day's walk without having to worry about stagging on at silly o clock, no light discipline, and having to bug out.
 
I'm gonna try out a hooped bivvy bag when I try out the South Downs Way mate.
A small hooped-design tent is (much) cheaper, a similar weight (1,5kg) and more insect-proof than many goretex bivi-bags. I used a cheapo model, about 60cm high, for walking across Switzerland five years ago and it was adequate, though definitely something just for sleeping, rather than spending all day in. That brand apparently no longer exists, but similar styles certainly still do.

I was mostly either far above habitation, or on a campsite and this was ok for Swiss law apparently(?). In Norway, on another little trip, the rules were even easier being a set distance from 'hutte' (200m?) and watercourses. In most of UK you might be 'moved on' by police or the landowner.
 
I dont think wild camping is allowed in England other than on Dartmoor , not that it would stop me doing it , leave no more than foot prints and I cant see an issue, if you go for a crap bury it , I`d be careful where I had a small fire though.
I understand wild camping in Porridgewoglandia is legal almost anywhere , guess thats how they get away with sleeping in parks , hedgerows and streets on the way home from the pub....every night.
I have in the past " Wild Camped " many a time in the Cheviots ... long before it was called " Wild Camping " . I have used both Refuge Huts and small tents ... there are areas of " Common Land * " not too far from where I live where with common sense you can also overnight camp .

Concerning gear you can always go minimalist as in the style of Rab and Jamesie seen below about to set out on the West Highland Way

2018 Rab C West H W.jpg


..... the two slab approach .

ETA * .... suitably identified on OS Maps
 
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OneTenner

War Hero
Book Reviewer
I spent six days in Kielder Forest, there are twelve 'wild camping areas' which are nothing more than reasonably flat areas with nothing other than a Forestry commission marker post to denote it, I took my two dogs with me, didn't see another soul from leaving the car park at Kielder Castle until we got to within a mile of it six days later. I started off with a bergen weight of 31kg, 9kg was dog food but they did get through it at 1.5kg a day... If I did it again, i'd get backpacks for the dogs to carry their own kit in!.
The sites are free to use but you do need to email them prior to visiting to check they're not already booked(details are on the Kielder Forest website) - some of the sites are only about five metres by three, all have running water (in a stream) close by so you'll need filtration kit. you're basically free to wander where you want, some of the undergrowth is dense thicket, some woodland bog - no or little mobile signal so unless you have good mapreading skills or a decent GPS you'd be better off sticking to something like the Pennine way - which doesn't officially allow wild camping but is tolerated on a 'dusk 'til dawn' basis somewhere non-intrusive.

ETA: I reckon if it wasn't for the dog 'stuff' - towels, blankets, food etc. plus a larger tent, my bergen weight would be around 19kg, could be lighter but I prefer 'wet' food, the dehydrated meals are tasteless, except for a hint of corrugated cardboard... it's possible to go lighter still but the cost / benefit doesn't do it for me. My one person tent is a Nordisk Svalbard 1, nearly bought a Hilleberg until I met a guy in Norway using a Nordisk and it seemed just as good but 1/3 the cost.
 
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I spent six days in Kielder Forest, there are twelve 'wild camping areas' which are nothing more than reasonably flat areas with nothing other than a Forestry commission marker post to denote it, I took my two dogs with me, didn't see another soul from leaving the car park at Kielder Castle until we got to within a mile of it six days later. I started off with a bergen weight of 31kg, 9kg was dog food but they did get through it at 1.5kg a day... If I did it again, i'd get backpacks for the dogs to carry their own kit in!.
The sites are free to use but you do need to email them prior to visiting to check they're not already booked(details are on the Kielder Forest website) - some of the sites are only about five metres by three, all have running water (in a stream) close by so you'll need filtration kit. you're basically free to wander where you want, some of the undergrowth is dense thicket, some woodland bog - no or little mobile signal so unless you have good mapreading skills or a decent GPS you'd be better off sticking to something like the Pennine way - which doesn't officially allow wild camping but is tolerated on a 'dusk 'til dawn' basis somewhere non-intrusive.
Great post. Cheers.
 
I'm gonna try out a hooped bivvy bag when I try out the South Downs Way mate.
I would look at 1 man tents before you go buying anything. Not the stupidly expensive ultralight gear (some mental bastards spend a grand apparently!) but you should be able to get one for under eighty quid.

You might end up carrying an extra half kilo compared to a bivvy but being able to sit up in the dry is worth it in my opinion.

If you want to PM me I've got my old DofE discount code you're welcome to use.
 
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OneTenner

War Hero
Book Reviewer
In Norway, on another little trip, the rules were even easier being a set distance from 'hutte' (200m?) and watercourses. In most of UK you might be 'moved on' by police or the landowner.
In Norway, you need to be 150m away from a building, not cross any land fences and move on if the landowner asks. I've been there a few times, once vehicle borne (different kit and routines), we bought a camping pass in Denmark which is valid for camping discounts in Norway, Sweden, Finland and (obviously) Denmark, the downside is most of the campsites are set up for camper vans and are very 'sterile', although we did find one near Lillehammer that was more secluded and tents only. We found a lot of places to camp mainly by luck, offroad driving is illegal in Norway except in winter. Wasn't aware about the distance from watercourse rule / law but we never really saw anyone once we'd set up camp so no-one to tell us otherwise. The other times I was with some Norgies in the Suomi areas, so I just followed their lead - we didn't have dogs & sleds but did have cross-country skis. From memory we were carrying about 25kg each, would have been lower except we had no resup. planned, we had a large-ish communal tent and just split the weight betweeen us.
 
Wild camping seems really popular in Cornwall, particularly in the shop doorways in Penzance.

A slightly misguided but well-meaning do-gooder walked out of Tesco in the high street last night, with a sarnie and a couple of beers for the wild-camper in Boots' doorway next door. Unfortunately, while handing the goodies over she failed to spot the Plod stood behind her. At least the chap got a night in the relative warmth of Camborne nick.
 
The closest I ever got to wild camping was sleeping in the back of my Transit on Forestry Commission land, or rural Scottish roadsides
 

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