Anyone i/d this medal for me?

#1
A while ago a mate found a medal in good order with no ribbon.

It is obviously a WW1 jobbie.

Silver metal and round.

Front: King George V Head.

Rear: Rider on a horse with dates 1914 - 1918

Was issued to a Pte F Hadfield Royal Highlanders. S-12157

If it is all possible he would like to return it to a) The Family or b) The appropriate museum.

I will be able to get a photo later if the description is not good enough.

Cheers in advance.
 
#2
A picture paints a thousand words!

Stilts
 
#3
It's probably the British War Medal. Most were minted in silver except for native troops which were minted in bronze.

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#4
From that quick description it could be the War Medal .... but as already stated - a photo would make it much easier!
 
#5
A while ago a mate found a medal in good order with no ribbon.

It is obviously a WW1 jobbie.

Silver metal and round.

Front: King George V Head.

Rear: Rider on a horse with dates 1914 - 1918

Was issued to a Pte F Hadfield Royal Highlanders. S-12157

If it is all possible he would like to return it to a) The Family or b) The appropriate museum.

I will be able to get a photo later if the description is not good enough.

Cheers in advance.
this
:- The British War Medal, 1914-18

Established on 26th July 1919.
The Front of the British War Medal, 1914-18 (Squeak)

Also known as 'Squeak'.

The silver or bronze medal was awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920.

Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V.

The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.
 
#6
It sounds like the British War Medal for the Great War:
 

Attachments

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
Concur 14-18 War Medal. Just checked reverse of my grandfather's. Don't know why the horse. Must have been an easy five million of them minted.
 
#9
All of you, many thanks.

Poacher that is the exact-a-mundo.

I will now try and find out about Pte F. Hadfield. Royal Highlanders. S-12157 and see if this medal can go where it belongs.

Cheers again you medal stars!
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
#12
Reverse is St George trampling on the shields of the Axis
Err.. That would be the Central Powers not the Axis... :? :p [/pedant]
 
#13
The National Archives | DocumentsOnline | Image Details

Private Frederick W Hadfield - for £2 to the National Archives, start your search.
Thanks for that, I now have his Medal Card. He was also awarded the Victory Medal.

Quick question though, how come there are 2 blokes in the Highland Regiment with the same regimental number at the same time? I am of course presuming that S/12157 is a Regimental number.

See screen shot below.

 
#14
Quick question though, how come there are 2 blokes in the Highland Regiment with the same regimental number at the same time? I am of course presuming that S/12157 is a Regimental number.
Two different regiments - your man was Black Watch, George Good was a Seaforth.
 
#15
If I remember correctly up until about 1917 maybe later off the top of my cant exactly remember numbering was down to regiments so concivebly there could be a few men with the same number but in different regts also I think the S prefix indicates a service battalion ie a kitchener army battalion the second bloke being in the 10th Battalion The Seaforths bears this out
 
#16
Thanks for that, I now have his Medal Card. He was also awarded the Victory Medal.

Quick question though, how come there are 2 blokes in the Highland Regiment with the same regimental number at the same time? I am of course presuming that S/12157 is a Regimental number.

See screen shot below.
They were always issued as a pair

Medal card of Hadfield, Frederick W
Corps Regiment No Rank
Royal Highlanders S/12157 Private


He looks to have survived the war as is not listed on :: CWGC ::

To be honest it's worth less than £20 in monetary value and I doubt any museum will have it off you.

If you get someone who has access to Family Tree, Genealogy and Census Records - Ancestry.co.uk or take up the free 2 week subsrciption you may find out if there are any records for the chap. It's a slim chance as only about 25% of the papers survived the blitz.

I would hang onto it and remember the man, very slim chance of finding the victory medal that goes with it.
 
#18
After my Mum died I got my old man's Bomber Command medals. One's a DFC and the other are campaign medals.

1) What's the best way to clean 'em?
2) Where can I get the history on them. I know his squadron. Can I get copies of his logs from anywhere?
 
#19
2) Where can I get the history on them. I know his squadron. Can I get copies of his logs from anywhere?
I will find out for you on boxing day. Member of my family had DFM + Bar, & BEM from service in Bomber Command. I will be seeing the custodians of the medals since he died a few years ago, on Boxing Day, and I know that when he died they went about obtaining the information on when/why they were awarded etc.
 
#20
After my Mum died I got my old man's Bomber Command medals. One's a DFC and the other are campaign medals.

1) What's the best way to clean 'em?
2) Where can I get the history on them. I know his squadron. Can I get copies of his logs from anywhere?
Logbooks are 'personal documents' [single manuscript document] so unless they were donated to the Sqn it sounds as though they are sadly lost.

Try webbing the Sqn number - there are a lot of old Sqns who still have an 'Old Boys Club'.
 
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