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Anyone got a copy of a Form G1098 (Infantry scale of Issues) from 1980's period

This isn't going to advance your research much, but it always makes me smile ...

A teddy bear is working on a building site. He goes for a tea break and when he returns he notices his pick has been stolen.

The bear is angry and reports the theft to the foreman.

The foreman grins at the bear and says






















"Oh, I forgot to tell you, today's the day the teddy bears have their picks nicked."​

There again, I'm easily pleased.
 
IIRC the g1098 was, as CQMS said, the equipment table ( TOE in American parlance) for a sub unit. It listed everything you were supposed to have, from vehicles to sandbags, both in peacetime and war (usually a bit more).
As regards picks & shovels, whatever the issue to individuals was, you'd also have had those from the CES for each vehicle too, but I think the standard shareout was 1 pick per 2 shovels.
Anorak note, if you were a static unit it was a g1198 instead.
 

ExWoofer

Swinger
IIRC the g1098 was, as CQMS said, the equipment table ( TOE in American parlance) for a sub unit. It listed everything you were supposed to have, from vehicles to sandbags, both in peacetime and war (usually a bit more).
.

Otherwise known as - as is says in the thread title - Scale of issue.
 
D

Deleted 4886

Guest
This is only from basic, but so far as I recall, if you needed a pick and shovel for an infantry exercise, you also needed a battle buddy, so it was one each a piece all round.
NOBODY in the British Army would have a 'Battle Buddy' FFS. Farkin Americanisms, rant, rant, rant.
 
INTERNET VERSION – MASTER IS
ON THE DEFENCE INTRANET
CHAPTER 1: GENERAL PRINCIPLES
INTRODUCTION
1. An Equipment Table (ET) lists, by des
ignation and quantity, the entitlement to
materiel to be held by a unit
of the Regular and Territorial
Army, Royal Marines (RM) and
other establishments. The ent
itlement is calculated from
the unit establishment (AF
C8005) ET Scales, and from an
approved quantity of non-scaled it
ems. The ET is used as
an accounting document.

Extract from JSP886 which can be found here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploa...130213_JSP886Vol4Part204_EquipTables_v2_1.pdf
 
That is a very interesting question. Being an American Indian who never served in the British Army during the relevant period, I cannot answer it for you. :? I can't think of many who did serve in the British Army who could answer it for you either, FWIW. Just to satisfy my own curiosity, why would it matter? :?
WOW! I never knew you was an Indian. Do you mean an indigenous American Indian? If so, what tribe? If you don't mind me asking.
 
NOBODY in the British Army would have a 'Battle Buddy' FFS. Farkin Americanisms, rant, rant, rant.

No, that's what it was called in training - or a battle partner.

Never heard of it after that, though.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Not in the 80's.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
That is a very interesting question. Being an American Indian who never served in the British Army during the relevant period, I cannot answer it for you. :? I can't think of many who did serve in the British Army who could answer it for you either, FWIW. Just to satisfy my own curiosity, why would it matter? :?

I suppose it makes a change to be asking 'why?' Instead of, 'how?'

Taxi!
 

ExWoofer

Swinger
The ones that the Woofers tried flogging.

I can say from personal experience that our reputation/nick name of ‘We Flog Rockets’ was totally and unquestionably umm …………justified. Fair one Harry!
 
I can say from personal experience that our reputation/nick name of ‘We Flog Rockets’ was totally and unquestionably umm …………justified. Fair one Harry!
Nothing personal, you understand. Just that at the time we had one of your chaps turn-up at ours, and he took rather a lot of ragging...
 

ExWoofer

Swinger
Nothing personal, you understand. Just that at the time we had one of your chaps turn-up at ours, and he took rather a lot of ragging...

No offence taken Harry. I was with 1WFR at Warminster at the time that situation started, so whilst some Regimental nicknames/ leg pulls are without foundation - ours was deserved/fact. Luckily I was in NI at the time it kicked off but I got my fair share of flak as a result - being attached to another 'unit'.
 
The answer could be quite difficult to track down for the OP especially as he is looking for 80s scalings.
It would depend on the unit role. armoured, mechanised, light or air assault, and the sub units within the Bn would also have different needs, i.e. support weapons or rifle coy.
I am not ex inf but I would be surprised if a grunt did not carry his own lightweight, folding entrenching tool even in the dark ages. Digging in is a basic skill after all.
If you find the scalings inadequate for use depending on the theatre, you can always rob stuff from vehicle kits. Even light B vehicles would have a pick and shovel behind a strap somewhere.
 

ExWoofer

Swinger
NOBODY in the British Army would have a 'Battle Buddy' FFS. Farkin Americanisms, rant, rant, rant.

I cant speak for Other Arms - but in the Inf we did use (as we called it) a buddy system. Post Falklands there were amendments issued to the Inf Platoon Basic Tactics (as contained in Pam 45 Part 2) which (formally) introduced the new method of F & M (Fire and Manoeuvre - not to be confused with the S & M - a wholly different, normally weekend activity!) where the Assault Fire Team movement was broken down into pairs during the assault through to the reorg. As a section Commander - good drills meant pairing off your guys as an SOP. Being as this learning came from post-Corporate fallout in late 82- I would suggest that if the Yanks used the term - then they nicked it from us.

The term was also used in ref to NBC drills - for IA etc.
 

ExWoofer

Swinger
I am not ex inf but I would be surprised if a grunt did not carry his own lightweight, folding entrenching tool even in the dark ages. Digging in is a basic skill after all..

I am ex-Inf and was a Reg during the "Dark ages" (80's) - the carrying of picks/shovels was standard for both CEMO/CEFO but its the Inf official issue/ratio I am after (plus also the full official scale of other Inf kit).

If you find the scalings inadequate for use depending on the theatre, you can always rob stuff from vehicle kits. Even light B vehicles would have a pick and shovel behind a strap somewhere.

Whilst B Veh's did have the GS kit - we (Inf) rarely used them (B Veh's) on exercise or planned on having them around on ops. 432's did have some kit but these were also the larger GS pick/shovel versions.We carried all we needed/had and had 'lightweight' picks/shovels for this reason (so named by someone who clearly never carried one for two weeks or more!!).
 

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