anyone fancy a new job

Discussion in 'The NAAFI Bar' started by jim24, Dec 11, 2010.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. jim24

    jim24 Book Reviewer

    The CIA need you

    https://www.cia.gov/careers/opportunities/support-professional/foreign-language-instructors.html

    Foreign Language Instructors
    Work Schedule: Full Time
    Salary: $56,857 – $97,333
    Location: Washington, DC metropolitan area

    The Central Intelligence Agency is hiring qualified and experienced Language Instructors of Arabic, Chinese/Mandarin, Dari, French, German, Greek, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Pashto, Persian (Farsi), Russian, Serbo-Croatian, and Turkish to work in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.

    The CIA provides first-class training for energetic, creative and committed intelligence professionals. CIA Language Instructors deliver programs that provide students with the foreign language communications skills and cross-cultural awareness they need to live and work abroad effectively, or to perform other language-related duties. Foreign Language Instructors apply the latest instructional methodologies to meet highly customized student needs and conduct language proficiency testing in reading, speaking and understanding for skills evaluation. In addition, they may be asked to provide a variety of language support services worldwide.

    Minimum requirements include a Bachelor's in foreign language, linguistics or a related field; native fluency in the language; 2-5 years of teaching experience; demonstrated knowledge of the respective area's history, culture, politics and economy; and the ability to use the latest technology and teaching techniques. Also desired are experience in teaching language skills to a wide range of adult students, from beginners to those at a more advanced proficiency level, and experience in program and/or education management. As part of the screening and interview process, applicants will be required to take language proficiency tests in their native language. Advanced English proficiency is also required.

    Salaries are based on the individual applicant's qualifications. In addition to base salary of 56,857 – $97,333. Language Instructors earn annual "bonus" pay ranging from $4,875 to $9,750, with the amount based on the language and their language proficiency. Language Instructors who speak multiple foreign languages may also qualify for additional bonuses in varying amounts. Furthermore, new employees can qualify for a lump-sum hiring bonus for languages, up to a maximum amount of $35,000.

    All applicants must successfully complete a thorough medical and psychological exam, a polygraph interview and an extensive background investigation. U.S. citizenship is required.

    To be considered suitable for Agency employment, applicants must generally not have used illegal drugs within the last twelve months. The issue of illegal drug use prior to twelve months ago is carefully evaluated during the medical and security processing.

    Important Notice: Friends, family, individuals, or organizations may be interested to learn that you are an applicant for or an employee of the CIA. Their interest, however, may not be benign or in your best interest. You cannot control whom they would tell. We therefore ask you to exercise discretion and good judgment in disclosing your interest in a position with the Agency. You will receive further guidance on this topic as you proceed through your CIA employment processing.

    To Apply:

    Make a note of the position(s) that interest you, as you can apply for up to four positions in one application. DO NOT submit multiple applications; this will only slow the review of your application, and delay processing. Please read the Application Instructions carefully before you begin the online application process.

    Application Instructions

    An equal opportunity employer and a drug-free work force.

    Posted: May 10, 2007 11:41 PM
    Last Updated: Nov 03, 2010 09:39 AM
    Last Reviewed: Nov 03, 2010 09:39 AM


    Special Opportunities

    * Occupational Health Nurse
    * Economic Analyst
    * Core Collector
    * Targeting Analyst
    * Military Analyst
    * Science, Weapons, and Technology Analyst
    * Support Integration Officer

    What Do You Think of Our Web Site? (opens in a new window)


    * Privacy
    * Copyright
    * Site Policies
    * USA.gov
    * FLU.gov
    * FOIA
    * DNI.gov
    * NoFEAR Act

    * Contact CIA
    * Site Map
     
  2. jim24

    jim24 Book Reviewer

    Clandestine Service
    The Ultimate International Career

    The CIA's Clandestine Service is the front-line source of clandestine information on critical international developments, from terrorism and weapons of mass destruction to military and political issues. The mission often requires clandestine service officers to live and work overseas, making a true commitment to the Agency. This is more than just a job – it's a way of life that challenges the deepest resources of personal intelligence, self-reliance and responsibility. National Clandestine Service Officers are individuals with varied backgrounds and life experiences, professional and educational histories, language capabilities, and other elements that allow us to meet our mission critical objectives.

    View our available Clandestine Service jobs.

    CLANDESTINE SERVICE POSITIONS

    Operations Officer

    Operations Officers serve on the front lines of the human intelligence collection business by clandestinely recruiting and handling sources of foreign intelligence. It takes special skills and professional discipline to establish strong human relationships that result in high-value intelligence from clandestine sources. An Operations Officer must be able to deal with fast-moving, ambiguous and unstructured situations. This requires physical and psychological health, energy, intuition, “street sense” and the ability to cope with stress. Operations Officers serve the bulk of their time in overseas assignments.

    Collection Management Officer

    As the link between the Clandestine Service Operations Officer in the field, the US foreign policy community and Intelligence Community analysts, it is the responsibility of the Collection Management Officer (CMO) to manage the collection, evaluation and dissemination of CIA intelligence information. Managing the collection effort requires determining what US policymakers need to know and then communicating those requirements to the Operations Officer. To be effective, the CMO must understand Clandestine Service operations and how they are conducted abroad, as well as international issues and overseas operating environments.

    Language Officer

    The Language Officer applies advanced foreign language skills, experience and expertise to provide high-quality translation, interpretation and language-related support for a variety of Clandestine Service operations. In addition to their expert language skills, Language Officers provide in-depth cultural insight — an important dimension of the job. They also work closely with officers in other Clandestine Service disciplines — particularly field collectors — to support the overall mission of intelligence acquisition. As with other Clandestine Service professions, foreign travel opportunities and certain specialized training are integral elements of the job.

    Operations Officer - Specialized Skills Officer

    Specialized Skills Officers focus on intelligence operations for US policymakers in hazardous and austere overseas environments. Military special operations or combat arms experience (ground, air, or maritime), previous foreign travel, combat service and foreign language proficiency are highly valued.


    The Clandestine Life

    Operations Officers and Collection Management Officers spend a significant portion of their time abroad. Typically, Operations Officers will serve 60% to 70% of their careers overseas, while Collection Management Officers will be overseas for 30% to 40% of their careers. Staff Operations Officers, although based in the Washington, D.C. area, travel overseas on a temporary basis. Language Officers also are primarily based in Washington, though short-term and some long-term foreign travel opportunities are available.

    Officers in each of these careers are under cover. By the very nature of this clandestine business, officers can expect limited external recognition for themselves and their families. Instead, the Agency has its own internal promotions, awards and medals, and makes every effort to recognize the accomplishments of its personnel.

    In addition to competitive pay, Officers are provided housing and receive overseas allowances and schooling benefits for their children when serving abroad. There are also other benefits, such as language pay incentives, that Officers can receive depending on their skills set and position duties. Collectively, the benefits enable Officers to make significant contributions that impact our national security, and experience a high level of job satisfaction and camaraderie throughout their career.


    Is This the Job for You?

    Traditionally, we have had an officer corps of considerable diversity in terms of politics, talent, personality, temperament and background. That said, there are some fundamental qualities common to most successful officers, including a strong record of academic and professional achievement, good writing skills, problem-solving abilities and highly developed interpersonal skills. Overseas experience and languages are important factors as well. Officers must be perennial students, in the sense that they are required to seek answers, learn other languages and study other cultures to enhance their abilities to deal effectively with foreign cultures and societies.


    Getting Started: Clandestine Service Trainee (CST) Program

    This is the launching pad for challenging positions in the National Clandestine Service, providing new officers an opportunity to follow in the footsteps of today's senior NCS managers. Uniquely qualified trainees are groomed in an intensive year-long training program to prepare them for the foreign-intelligence-collection challenges facing the US today.

    The National Clandestine Service has a second program, the Professional Trainee (PT) Program, for recent college graduates, after which PTs may be considered for the CST Program.
    [Top of page]



    Posted: Apr 21, 2007 06:14 PM
    Last Updated: Sep 21, 2009 12:12 PM
    Last Reviewed: May 12, 2009 10:00 AM


    Special Opportunities

    * Occupational Health Nurse
    * Economic Analyst
    * Core Collector
    * Targeting Analyst
    * Military Analyst
    * Science, Weapons, and Technology Analyst
    * Support Integration Officer

    What Do You Think of Our Web Site? (opens in a new window)


    * Privacy
    * Copyright
    * Site Policies
    * USA.gov
    * FLU.gov
    * FOIA
    * DNI.gov
    * NoFEAR Act

    * Contact CIA
    * Site Map
     
  3. One slight flaw in your plan, " U.S. citizenship is required."
    As I understand it,they don't give those away.
     
  4. jim24

    jim24 Book Reviewer

    They wouldn't have me anyway, ever since I smashed up their spy plane in 87 I'm on the shit list
     
  5. An accident in Cyprus I assume?
     
  6. jim24

    jim24 Book Reviewer

    No, 95 Recce sqn in Alconbury, the tractor jumped into gear while we were trying to connect the airlines to its compressor and rammed a TR1 that had just landed, causing a certain amount of friction between my employers and the USAF, something to do with the $20million worth of damage we did
     
  7. With their mutual track records, I think we've just found a new job for Gordon Brown.
     
  8. mind you we annoyed them in cyprus by asking them what was up with the kennedy shooting:)
     
  9. I told 'em that Sara Palin was a 'Sleeper' from the FSB..... and whose name was really spelt Saryaski Palinesque
     
  10. Do you mean to say she isn't? She has said she can see Russia from her house, so perhaps she is homesick.
     
  11. Really? I would have thought that first, they could do with some help speaking english.