Anyone done 10 x 10 aka German Volume Training?

I've re-built my squat back up to 5/4 x reps of 140 kg (4 sets, then I lighten it to 80kg and do 'as many as possible' for the last set), but the weight felt crushing, like I might do myself an injury. I've read that if I did some 1 rep max squats, that may alter my perception of lighter weights, but that kind of scares me and I can't guarantee I've got someone to spot for me.

I'm 52 and in fairly good nick, but really don't want to snap anything.

So I tried some German volume training and started with 60kg, 10 reps x 10 sets with 1 min strict between each set. That was fairly easy so the following week I used 70kg, that was hard. Then the following week 72.5kg and this week 75 kg, and I plan to continue to do this once per week, adding 2.5 kg each time, till I plateau, then have a re-think.

But I am liking this way of training and considering doing it for the bench press and lat pull downs.

I'm in-and-out the gym in well under half-an-hour and my legs feel like they've been stimulated.

Has anyone done GVT over a prolonged period of time? Did you find it effective? Will I find myself stronger when I go back to squatting heavy?
 
Based on the latest literature from RP strength, RTS, DDS, Schoenfeld etc it's essentially 'junk volume' and contrary to trying to acquire 'effective reps' as efficiently as possible.

It's like folk that do 20-rep squat sets with a weight that isn't their 10RM. The set is supposed to be a workout in itself not 'fluff' volume.

I used to do a lot of high volume squatting simply because I enjoy it as I'm anthropometrically suited to it, but it's still ineffective.

Once you've completed some form of novice linear progression, you want to perhaps incorporate DUP style training and using RPE/ RIR to assess accumulating effective reps. You don't have to 'max out' every session to get stronger, it's actually disadvantageous long term due to needing more recovery. You can get stronger leaving 2-4 reps in the tank for a single/ set.

I do a lot of squat singles @6-8 RPE. It ensures I retain the ability to express strength as a skill, without using a lot of my recovery budget for subsequent volume work.

Also incorporate movements that address weaknesses in a compound movement. My quads bottleneck my squat, as such I incorporate leg extensions, leg press, hack squats etc to address this (I can't front squat for shit).

Similarly for benching, my triceps bottleneck progress in this movement. As such I do a lot of close grip benching and tricep isolation work to break bench plateaus (it's got me from 135kg to 150kg this year).

Sorry for the verbose answer, it's a passionate hobby :smile:
 
Based on the latest literature from RP strength, RTS, DDS, Schoenfeld etc it's essentially 'junk volume' and contrary to trying to acquire 'effective reps' as efficiently as possible.

It's like folk that do 20-rep squat sets with a weight that isn't their 10RM. The set is supposed to be a workout in itself not 'fluff' volume.

I used to do a lot of high volume squatting simply because I enjoy it as I'm anthropometrically suited to it, but it's still ineffective.

Once you've completed some form of novice linear progression, you want to perhaps incorporate DUP style training and using RPE/ RIR to assess accumulating effective reps. You don't have to 'max out' every session to get stronger, it's actually disadvantageous long term due to needing more recovery. You can get stronger leaving 2-4 reps in the tank for a single/ set.

I do a lot of squat singles @6-8 RPE. It ensures I retain the ability to express strength as a skill, without using a lot of my recovery budget for subsequent volume work.

Also incorporate movements that address weaknesses in a compound movement. My quads bottleneck my squat, as such I incorporate leg extensions, leg press, hack squats etc to address this (I can't front squat for shit).

Similarly for benching, my triceps bottleneck progress in this movement. As such I do a lot of close grip benching and tricep isolation work to break bench plateaus (it's got me from 135kg to 150kg this year).

Sorry for the verbose answer, it's a passionate hobby :smile:

Agreed. Ironically, given it's name, GVT does not appear to be an efficient training method. Personally, I prefer to work in Blocks, starting with relatively high volume - although nowhere near as high as 10 x 10 - and slowly decrease the number of reps as the weight goes up over several months. When the gyms finally reopened this year, I hadn't done any lifting for over six months. I started doing Safety Bar Box Squats with something like 80kg. On Wednesday, I did 3 x 3 with 125kg.

By no means do I consider myself strong, but this kind of slow, consistent progression allows me to keep improving and, just as importantly, avoid injuries.
 
Agreed. Ironically, given it's name, GVT does not appear to be an efficient training method. Personally, I prefer to work in Blocks, starting with relatively high volume - although nowhere near as high as 10 x 10 - and slowly decrease the number of reps as the weight goes up over several months. When the gyms finally reopened this year, I hadn't done any lifting for over six months. I started doing Safety Bar Box Squats with something like 80kg. On Wednesday, I did 3 x 3 with 125kg.

By no means do I consider myself strong, but this kind of slow, consistent progression allows me to keep improving and, just as importantly, avoid injuries.

I was fortunate enough to kit out a garage gym when I left the army so gyms closing wasn't a big deal.

My volume phases I'll do a variation of the competition lift to help address weaknesses, such as beltless, paused or tempo squats. For conv. dead lifts I favour tempo RDLs & SGDLs.

A lot of folk advocate 'training blocks/ cycles'; spending x number of weeks improving hypertrophy, then a cycle that specifically trains strength/ power to make use of the additional mass, or periodising a block to go from volume to strength to power as you stated for your training block.

Other folk are happy to train strength/ power all year (with pivot/ deload periods) but add 'fluff' hypertrophy work to their sessions, which is what I prefer atm.

I think anyone who has completed a novice linear progression and maintains that level of ability is 'strong' and should appreciate the benefits it brings to everyday life alongside your 10k steps/ day and other useful health metrics.
 
Once you've completed some form of novice linear progression, you want to perhaps incorporate DUP style training and using RPE/ RIR to assess accumulating effective reps. You don't have to 'max out' every session to get stronger, it's actually disadvantageous long term due to needing more recovery. You can get stronger leaving 2-4 reps in the tank for a single/ set.

Okay, after reading your post, I'm binning the GVT.

Though I haven't got a clue what DUP style training is, but luckily I have the internet.

Thank you for taking the time to help me out.
 
Okay, after reading your post, I'm binning the GVT.

Though I haven't got a clue what DUP style training is, but luckily I have the internet.

Thank you for taking the time to help me out.

Daily Undulating Periodisation, such as 531. Basically training strength across a different rep range each session.

Enjoy!
 

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