Any suggestions for family suv sort of thing?

#61
I’m seeing pictures of pumped up hatchbacks, not SUBs. Rover were ahead of their time with that hideous thing they did with the 25
The "Streetwise"!

Please don't remind me, I was this [holds forefinger and thumb millimetres apart] close to buying a tax-free one in Germany, as my wife was quite taken by them. I'm glad that I stood my ground and we ended up getting the Galant VR4 instead.
 
#62
The "Streetwise"!

Please don't remind me, I was this [holds forefinger and thumb millimetres apart] close to buying a tax-free one in Germany, as my wife was quite taken by them. I'm glad that I stood my ground and we ended up getting the Galant VR4 instead.
That’s the badger. Take a small hatch, raise the ride height and stick some plastic on it to make it look tuff. The rest of the world is doing it now.

I just don’t get the street oriented SUV. It misses the point. I wish I’d kept my mothers Matra Simca Rancho.

There isn’t a single modern SUV I aspire to own....
 
#63
DN Jr has a Suzuki which has been faultless for the past 18 months. I am quite taken by the current Vitara model which we got as a courtesy car. If the Merc breaks I will consider a Vitara 1.6 diesel.
 
#64
That’s the badger. Take a small hatch, raise the ride height and stick some plastic on it to make it look tuff. The rest of the world is doing it now.

I just don’t get the street oriented SUV. It misses the point. I wish I’d kept my mothers Matra Simca Rancho.

There isn’t a single modern SUV I aspire to own....
[/PERSEC]

We were eventually given them as "job cars" when I worked for Chrysler UK (CUK).

This is one I stumbled across in France, outside a dealership.

Yup! You'll have to excuse the flares, denim waistcoat and "cheesecloth" shirt . . . it was 1975 :( .

[PERSEC]

Kool Dude honeymoon France 1975.jpg
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
#65
As previously stated, I am no petro head, cars do not excite me in any way, they were a means of getting to work that carried my tools and equipment, in a modicum of comfort. I have had in the past 2 ltr cars, which I found to be adequate for my needs, that is about the measure of my knowledge of it. Cars = wheel at each corner, I feed em, shoe em and clean em, that's it, any more than that, its into the garage. My knowledge is not as extensive as yours, as I have no interest, and as such I do not cream my boxers when a new model comes on the market. horses for courses.
You should get a couple of good years out of it mate. The tiny motor with a large turbocharger has a design life of five or six years to fit in with the growing trend for leasing then swapping for new every three or four years. You can help out by letting the engine tick over for a few minutes after a good run and by frequent oil and belt changes.
 
#66
After having a scout around I can't say that any family SUV has jumped out at me. Most are just plastic and body work.
I really like the size, shape and 4x4 capability of the Freelander 2, but..... It's a Land Rover.
The new Duster has had some good reviews, but......

The search goes on....
 
#67
I just don’t get the street oriented SUV. It misses the point.
Perhaps they should change the marketing to reflect reality. We all agree there's noting 'sport' about SUV's. So they should be marketing then as high-ride space-rich car, nothing more?
 
#68
Perhaps they should change the marketing to reflect reality. We all agree there's noting 'sport' about SUV's. So they should be marketing then as high-ride space-rich car, nothing more?
I don't know how to define "sport" in the context of the thread. My Cayenne came with 911 type 2 wheels with 295/35 Continental tires. Consequently and aided by a fairly hard suspension it corners smartly for an SUV.

It can also reach 170 kph in fourth of its eight gears.

This is, apparently, in no way "sporty"?
 
#69
I don't know how to define "sport" in the context of the thread. My Cayenne came with 911 type 2 wheels with 295/35 Continental tires. Consequently and aided by a fairly hard suspension it corners smartly for an SUV.

It can also reach 170 kph in fourth of its eight gears.

This is, apparently, in no way "sporty"?
All rather illustrates my point. Take the VW Tuareg, a reasonable premium utility vehicle, tart it up with a flash body, Porsche badges etc, lower its suspension and put it on alloys with low profile tyres and it starts to loose its utility.

Add even wider wheels and even lower profile tyres from a 911 and you’ve got a car which has pretty much lost any pretence to utility. Have you got a sports car? Not really; sure it might be quick in a straight line and go round corners we’ll for a high vehicle, but it’s no 911.

I guess any car is a compromise, but to me a high performed SUV rather missed the utility bit. Not knocking your choice BTW; My brother has an SVR Range Rover Sport and I don’t get that either. His argument is that he needs a 4x4 for the winter. So why buy one which needs aggressive low profile tyres? I just don’t get big sports SUVs

Which is why our garage holds an old Prado that frankly takes anything, anywhere with zero fear of breakdown or concern about damage. It does utility with aplomb. And an Elise for days when a sportscar is needed.

Incidentally we’ve had a Kia Carnival on hire for a few days. It’s enormous inside, comfortable and quick (V6 petrol). Never really looked at an MPV before, but I can’t see why anyone would buy an SUV to fit the family in. Very impressive vehicle.
 
#70
All rather illustrates my point. Take the VW Tuareg, a reasonable premium utility vehicle, tart it up with a flash body, Porsche badges etc, lower its suspension and put it on alloys with low profile tyres and it starts to loose its utility.

Add even wider wheels and even lower profile tyres from a 911 and you’ve got a car which has pretty much lost any pretence to utility. Have you got a sports car? Not really; sure it might be quick in a straight line and go round corners we’ll for a high vehicle, but it’s no 911.

I guess any car is a compromise, but to me a high performed SUV rather missed the utility bit. Not knocking your choice BTW; My brother has an SVR Range Rover Sport and I don’t get that either. His argument is that he needs a 4x4 for the winter. So why buy one which needs aggressive low profile tyres? I just don’t get big sports SUVs

Which is why our garage holds an old Prado that frankly takes anything, anywhere with zero fear of breakdown or concern about damage. It does utility with aplomb. And an Elise for days when a sportscar is needed.

Incidentally we’ve had a Kia Carnival on hire for a few days. It’s enormous inside, comfortable and quick (V6 petrol). Never really looked at an MPV before, but I can’t see why anyone would buy an SUV to fit the family in. Very impressive vehicle.
I agree its no 911, but if I'd wanted one I wouldn't have bought a Cayenne. Don't know about losing utility. It ( complete with 21 inch wheels and low profile tires)will be carting an old pool and a load of other junk to (and across) the City landfill on the weekend. The suspension's not lowered btw. Its standard height. In winter, end of this month, it'll be on 18 inch rims with Toyo Observe winters.
 
#71
All rather illustrates my point. Take the VW Tuareg, a reasonable premium utility vehicle, tart it up with a flash body, Porsche badges etc, lower its suspension and put it on alloys with low profile tyres and it starts to loose its utility.

Add even wider wheels and even lower profile tyres from a 911 and you’ve got a car which has pretty much lost any pretence to utility. Have you got a sports car? Not really; sure it might be quick in a straight line and go round corners we’ll for a high vehicle, but it’s no 911.

I guess any car is a compromise, but to me a high performed SUV rather missed the utility bit. Not knocking your choice BTW; My brother has an SVR Range Rover Sport and I don’t get that either. His argument is that he needs a 4x4 for the winter. So why buy one which needs aggressive low profile tyres? I just don’t get big sports SUVs

Which is why our garage holds an old Prado that frankly takes anything, anywhere with zero fear of breakdown or concern about damage. It does utility with aplomb. And an Elise for days when a sportscar is needed.

Incidentally we’ve had a Kia Carnival on hire for a few days. It’s enormous inside, comfortable and quick (V6 petrol). Never really looked at an MPV before, but I can’t see why anyone would buy an SUV to fit the family in. Very impressive vehicle.
The "Premium" comment regarding a VW illustrates a point. In Europe, VW have the Seat and Skoda brands, which give the group brands they can appeal to the lower market segments with. The cars are basically the same, but positioned differently in the market. In the US, there is no such Seat or Skoda brand, and the VW brand itself is the entry-level in their range. You can go up to Audi, Porsche or Bentley, but there's nothing below VW. A VW is generally inexpensive. A couple times a year they do a "sign and drive" event, where you turn up, sign the paperwork for a 3 year lease on a Jetta or Passat, and it's between $200 and $250 a month lease payments. Nothing down, turn the car in at the end. Cheap as chips motoring. Just lease another one at the end of the term. Granted you never gain any equity in the car, but so what, if you're always driving a less-than-three-years-old car for $200/month? The cars aren't that bad.

I guess my point is that car manufacturers take the piss with models in different markets. VWs are premium in one market and entry level in another. Years ago, Nissan sold the old European Primera as an Infiniti luxury car in the US. My mate had one, and it had fancy leather seats and electric toys up the ying-yang. But it was still a Nissan Primera to my eyes.

GM had an image problem with the Buick brand - old people bought Buicks and no-one else did. Now they import Opel models rebadged as Buicks, and they are nothing like the old 3-box Buick sheds. Shame they sold GM Europe to the Frogs, but I'm sure they made arrangements to continue the rebadging.

Dunno what the "perfect" SUV is. I suppose it depends on where you're going to drive it. A Police-spec Chevy Tahoe would be pretty close in the US or Canada, but not much use in Europe.
 
#72
I agree its no 911, but if I'd wanted one I wouldn't have bought a Cayenne. Don't know about losing utility. It ( complete with 21 inch wheels and low profile tires)will be carting an old pool and a load of other junk to (and across) the City landfill on the weekend. The suspension's not lowered btw. Its standard height. In winter, end of this month, it'll be on 18 inch rims with Toyo Observe winters.
Not knocking your car choice; if it works for you then great.

But I think you will find all Cayenne’s ride lower than the Touareg on which they are based.

The only place you see them here is in the cities. No-one in their right sense of mind would take a Cayenne into the country where it might have to face our dirt roads. Just too vulnerable to minor damage becoming a major issue, particularly as you can’t fit proper roo bars.

Nice car though.
 
#73
GM had an image problem with the Buick brand - old people bought Buicks and no-one else did. Now they import Opel models rebadged as Buicks, and they are nothing like the old 3-box Buick sheds. Shame they sold GM Europe to the Frogs, but I'm sure they made arrangements to continue the rebadging.

Dunno what the "perfect" SUV is. I suppose it depends on where you're going to drive it. A Police-spec Chevy Tahoe would be pretty close in the US or Canada, but not much use in Europe.
GM Holden are selling the new Opel Insignia badged as a Holden Commodore here. No idea how long that will last, but PSA would get no traction with a big saloon in Aus. GM tried to relaunch Opel here a few years ago and failed, so the Frogs can’t use that brand. I suspect they’ll continue to sell Opels to GM for a while. Just a damn shame that they don’t come rear wheel drive with a 6 litre V8!

As for the best SUV, I seat towards proper 4x4s that can go anywhere, I can hose out and that don’t need much fixing. I’ve become a Prado convert.

Otherwise if I just want space I’d buy an MPV. Far less compromised. The fact is, very few people actually need an SUV which is why they’re becoming more car like each generation. Look at the latest XTrail, Outlander or Vitara; they’ve lost all pretence for going off road. As for the Evoque soft top......
 
#74
Not knocking your car choice; if it works for you then great.

But I think you will find all Cayenne’s ride lower than the Touareg on which they are based.

The only place you see them here is in the cities. No-one in their right sense of mind would take a Cayenne into the country where it might have to face our dirt roads. Just too vulnerable to minor damage becoming a major issue, particularly as you can’t fit proper roo bars.

Nice car though.
The Touareg, Cayenne and Audi SUV models were all developed at the same time. Thus the Cayenne isn't based upon the Touareg, or anything else.
I agree the T does look taller and from reviews it's actually a bit wobbly and armchair-like compared to the C. Not as bad as the 2000 Yukon I had back then. It's been SUV's for the last 17 years as nothing else would really work.

The Cayenne is the best of them.
 
#75
Here is something a little different. Ssangyonggb are growing massively in the UK, you get a 5 year warranty and an MPV comparable size wise to a Nissan Qashqai starting at £!7k.

Might be worth a look at all the models:

SsangYong Tivoli XLV The New 4x4 Crossover SUV Car, ILOVIT
Lass at work sold her Defender and bought a new SsangYong Korando. They have a very long way to go to become a vehicle worth buying. I though Dacias were poor inside.

Remembering she came from a 15 year old Defender, she says its a horrible car to drive!!!
 
#76
Don't knock it kiddo, I have been driving for 46 years, and was pleasantly surprised with the acceleration, the turbo kicks in immediately, and is surprisingly fast when needed, it may be a joke to you confirmed petrol heads, but the techknowledgy is very sophisticated, and it will give many compatible cars a run for their money, a good solid small SUV. A 5 hour run to Portsmouth last year was comfortable and enjoyable, what was not was the prats in bigger cars who thought a small car was fair game to piss off, more than once they were more than surprised to see a small ford zip past, easily and comfortably. I admit its not an aficionados car, its not meant too be, its a good solid family medium SUV, does its job admirably. Its a Mr Averages car. no more, no less.
I assume its an Ecoboost if its a 998cc 3 cylinder? Good luck with that!!!!

I presume you know of the £100m in compensation so far and the £1bn legal case against Ford and its Ecoboost engines?

One of the designers here had his replaced under warranty after it ate itself at 12k, he still had to pay nearly £800 in "investigations". His "new" engine turned out to be a reconditioned one. It gave up exactly 1 week after being handed back by Ford. Currently being asked for another £600 for "handling".
 
#77
The Touareg, Cayenne and Audi SUV models were all developed at the same time. Thus the Cayenne isn't based upon the Touareg, or anything else.
I agree the T does look taller and from reviews it's actually a bit wobbly and armchair-like compared to the C. Not as bad as the 2000 Yukon I had back then. It's been SUV's for the last 17 years as nothing else would really work.

The Cayenne is the best of them.
There's also the Bentley Bentayga.

Bentley Bentayga SUV | Bentley Motors

If ever there was a car that didn't need to be made, this is it :) A mere $229K for the base model.

Or maybe save a few shekels and get a Lambo - the Urus. A mere $200K.

Urus Lamborghini

Then there's the VW Atlas. Starting at $31K. It's not the same platform, but damned-near the same size.

2018 VW Atlas - midsize family SUV | Volkswagen

See earlier comment regarding VW group taking the piss.
 
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#79
Do not under any circumstances buy anything with a 'q' or a 'k' in its name, especially one that has both. In fact, and come to think of it, do not buy anything that was manufactured after a SIIA ex-army FFR Land Rover unless it is a Range Rover Classic V8.

OZ
 
#80
After having a scout around I can't say that any family SUV has jumped out at me. Most are just plastic and body work.
I really like the size, shape and 4x4 capability of the Freelander 2, but..... It's a Land Rover.
The new Duster has had some good reviews, but......

The search goes on....
My tame landrover man swears by the freelander2. He tried to persuade me to get one when I bought my second full fat L113 rrover. He tells me they are the least bother of all the models he sees as long as oil has been changed regularly.
I only declined as I thought they were a bit of a wives car , but reading most of the dripping Fanny’s salivating over entrails and other throwaway suv’s, they would fit right in.
You could allways say it’s the wife’s.
 

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