Any Spitfire Fans?

#2
Me,Me,me im a huge fan of the Spit, and the Hurricane, oh and the B-17 Sally-B which im a supporter of, though of course never forget men who flew them, being the dogs nuts as well. :)
 
#3
A couple of guys at work mentioned the lastest Top Gear episode, apparently the chaps went to Germany to challenge a German version of the same show.

They landed in 2 seater Spit's to take on the opposition. I was at work, does anyone have a linky please !
 
#8
A statue of Mitchell should be placed on the plinth in Trafalgar Square instead of that pregnant Spacca! What a machine! English engineering at it's best!
 
#11
This pretty much sums it up;

Speed and altitude records

Beginning in late 1943, high-speed diving trials were undertaken at Farnborough to investigate the handling characteristics of aircraft travelling at speeds near the sound barrier (i.e. the onset of compressibility effects). Because it had the highest limiting Mach number of any aircraft at that time, a Spitfire XI was chosen to take part in these trials. Due to the high altitudes necessary for these dives, a fully feathering Rotol propeller was fitted to prevent overspeeding. It was during these trials that EN409, flown by Squadron Leader J. R. Tobin, reached 606 mph (975 km/h, Mach 0.891) in a 45 degree dive. In April 1944 the same aircraft suffered engine failure in another dive while being flown by Squadron Leader A. F. Martindale, when the propeller and reduction gear broke off. Martindale successfully glided the Spitfire 20 miles (32 km) back to the airfield and landed safely.

"That any operational aircraft off the production line, cannons sprouting from its wings and warts and all, could readily be controlled at this speed when the early jet aircraft such as Meteors, Vampires, P-80s, etc could not, was certainly extraordinary.― Jeffrey Quill"

On 5 February 1952, a Spitfire 19 of No. 81 Squadron RAF based in Hong Kong reached probably the highest altitude ever achieved by a Spitfire. The pilot, Flight Lieutenant Ted Powles, was on a routine flight to survey outside air temperature and report on other meteorological conditions at various altitudes in preparation for a proposed new air service through the area. He climbed to 50,000 feet (15,240 m) indicated altitude, with a true altitude of 51,550 feet (15,712 m). The cabin pressure fell below a safe level, and in trying to reduce altitude, he entered an uncontrollable dive which shook the aircraft violently. He eventually regained control somewhere below 3,000 feet (900 m) and landed safely with no discernible damage to his aircraft. Evaluation of the recorded flight data suggested that, in the dive, he achieved a speed of 690 mph (1,110 km/h, Mach 0.94), which would have been the highest speed ever reached by a propeller-driven aircraft.

The critical Mach number of the Spitfire's original elliptical wing was higher than the subsequently-used laminar-flow-section, straight-tapering planform wing of the follow-on Supermarine Spiteful, Seafang and Attacker, illustrating that Reginald Mitchell's thoughtful and practical engineering approach to the problems of high speed flight had paid off handsomely.
Last para says it all really.

To put it into perspective, current Tornado has a service ceilling of 50,000'. Slightly unfair I know but interesting non the less.


If anyone has a leaning towards this, here are some original trial reports from A&AEE Boscombe; Spitfire Trial Reports
 

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#14
Any Englishman who is not moved by the sight of a Spitfire in flight does not have the right to refer to himself as such! They are quite possibly the most beautiful machines ever created. They are what modern art should be.
 
#16
The-Lord-Flasheart said:
This pretty much sums it up;

Speed and altitude records

Beginning in late 1943, high-speed diving trials were undertaken at Farnborough to investigate the handling characteristics of aircraft travelling at speeds near the sound barrier (i.e. the onset of compressibility effects). Because it had the highest limiting Mach number of any aircraft at that time, a Spitfire XI was chosen to take part in these trials. Due to the high altitudes necessary for these dives, a fully feathering Rotol propeller was fitted to prevent overspeeding. It was during these trials that EN409, flown by Squadron Leader J. R. Tobin, reached 606 mph (975 km/h, Mach 0.891) in a 45 degree dive. In April 1944 the same aircraft suffered engine failure in another dive while being flown by Squadron Leader A. F. Martindale, when the propeller and reduction gear broke off. Martindale successfully glided the Spitfire 20 miles (32 km) back to the airfield and landed safely.

"That any operational aircraft off the production line, cannons sprouting from its wings and warts and all, could readily be controlled at this speed when the early jet aircraft such as Meteors, Vampires, P-80s, etc could not, was certainly extraordinary.― Jeffrey Quill"

On 5 February 1952, a Spitfire 19 of No. 81 Squadron RAF based in Hong Kong reached probably the highest altitude ever achieved by a Spitfire. The pilot, Flight Lieutenant Ted Powles, was on a routine flight to survey outside air temperature and report on other meteorological conditions at various altitudes in preparation for a proposed new air service through the area. He climbed to 50,000 feet (15,240 m) indicated altitude, with a true altitude of 51,550 feet (15,712 m). The cabin pressure fell below a safe level, and in trying to reduce altitude, he entered an uncontrollable dive which shook the aircraft violently. He eventually regained control somewhere below 3,000 feet (900 m) and landed safely with no discernible damage to his aircraft. Evaluation of the recorded flight data suggested that, in the dive, he achieved a speed of 690 mph (1,110 km/h, Mach 0.94), which would have been the highest speed ever reached by a propeller-driven aircraft.

The critical Mach number of the Spitfire's original elliptical wing was higher than the subsequently-used laminar-flow-section, straight-tapering planform wing of the follow-on Supermarine Spiteful, Seafang and Attacker, illustrating that Reginald Mitchell's thoughtful and practical engineering approach to the problems of high speed flight had paid off handsomely.
Last para says it all really.

To put it into perspective, current Tornado has a service ceilling of 50,000'. Slightly unfair I know but interesting non the less.


If anyone has a leaning towards this, here are some original trial reports from A&AEE Boscombe; Spitfire Trial Reports
Brilliant. It is a great shame that the town of his birth has only a very shabby static display model of a very late Spitfire in its museum.

Then again what would you expect in Stoke?
 
#17
During the Battle of Britain, in a legendary front line General Officer briefing on Luftwaffe tactics, the Reichsmarshall asked what his pilots needed to win the battle. Werner Molders replied he would like the Bf 109 to be fitted with more powerful engines.

Galland replied, " I should like an outfit of Spitfires for my Squadron "

Goring was speechless with rage..
 
#18
While all Spitfires cause a rousing in my trousers (it's been known, just the slightest hint of a single merlin) I have as much admiration for Sydney Camm's Hurricane. Manouverable, a stable gun platform, reasonable performance and crucially quick to manufacture and repair in 1940. As the ultimate expression of prop aircraft it's the Spitfire mind.
 
#19
The Merlin engine also transformed the P51 Mustang from a flying donkey into a thoroughbred which saved many of the bomber crews lives when those brave boys delivered payback to the dastardly boche!
 

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