Any recommended reading?

Discussion in 'AGC, RAPTC and SASC' started by tomjj, Jan 16, 2009.

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  1. It doesn't look like I am getting into RMP for a while so I want to read a bit of the law I will learn in phase 2. Any recommended books with definitions of theft and that sort of thing?

    Seen a few books on amazon but I am not sure what's best (Obviously they wont be exactly what I need to learn but will be good just for a slight insight) Thanks
     
  2. Unless you're loaded use the library!

    Blackstones and Butterworths are great for definitions and points to prove. Also good at all levels is:

    http://www.wikicrimeline.co.uk/index.php?title=Main_Page.

    You will be taught what you need for the course but hopefully learn a hell of a lot more at your first company.

    If you want to amuse yourself look at simple definitions of theft, assault, criminal damage etc. see if you can find the legal definition of a fact, actus reus, mens rea and all that good stuff. It's good for insomnia!
     
  3. Yeh library probably is the better option- Blackstones police manual is £56! Cheers
     
  4. Alternatively, plenty of cheap Blackstones on ebay
     
  5. Yeh just had a look there. Maybe I can grap a cheap book for student police officers in Smiths tomorrow
     
  6. I wouldn't look too closely at books designed to help civpol pass their exams (OSPRE type stuff) as they may lead you slightly off-track as regards RMP
     
  7. Pop into any Waterstones branch located near a University and you'll find a few reasonably priced books. HAve a good look at what it is that you may need (over a period of time) before you lay out on law books as they (as you've noted) are quite hefty in price.

    I would recommed PACE by Ozin, Norton & Spivey (Blackstones), which is around £25. Lookout for 'Unlocking Criminal Law' by Martin & Storey (about £20 ish). The 'Unlocking Series' are pretty easy books to follow and provide plenty of case law to help you follow the principles. If you are really strapped, then I would suggest that you have a look at the Routledge-Cavendish 'Lawcards' (both Criminal Law & Evidence) series and/or the Law Express series. 'Lawcards' and Law Express aren't text books, they are short 'swot' books, which are pretty good revision aids, but no more than that. Lawcards are small books at about £8 and Law Express about £9. Both have companion websites which give you flash cards and progress tests for free. If you are close to a University which runs courses/degrees for the Police (most modern ones do), then you'll find a large selection of other books and revision guides. Consider what it is that you need before buying and how long you will be using it for. Any good book on PACE is a winner as is any general Criminal Law book.

    The areas you need to concentrate on are Theft, Criminal Damage, Offences Against the Person & PACE. Don't try to overload your brain before you start training. Just get the general gist of what the main definitions and points to prove are. Your instructor will do the rest for you, but a little bit of pre course prep isn't a bad thing.
     
  8. What Biscuits said (The areas you need to concentrate on are Theft, Criminal Damage, Offences Against the Person & PACE. Don't try to overload your brain before you start training. Just get the general gist of what the main definitions and points to prove are. Your instructor will do the rest for you, but a little bit of pre course prep isn't a bad thing)

    Seconded.
     
  9. Don't bother trying to remember too much. If you want, just try to know:

    s1(1), s2, s.3, s.4(1), s.5,s.6 and s.7 Theft Act 1968. Where the statute talks about things like trusts etc, then don't bother.
    Also s.1(1), 1(2), 1(3), 2, 3, Criminal Damage Act 1971, subsections 1 of s1 -5 Public Order Act 1986, s.47, 20 and 18 Offences Agaisnt the persons Act 1861 and s9(1), 12(1), 25(1) Theft Act 1968. Also s.3(1) Theft Act 1978, and s.11(1) Fraud Act 2006.

    Don't bother with things like evidence as the RMP seems to have a very 'black-letter' approach to learning IE they like learning by rote so you don't want to be learning from different sources and therefore confusing yourself. I would also not bother with points to prove yet because you might learn different points from what is provided in the learning mat'l and confuse yourself.
     
  10. Points to prove don't change-they are what constitute the offence and are drawn from the definition.
     
  11. You are right! However, they are presented a certain way in the course mat'l and he might get confused if he's made to modfiy what he's already remembered.

    Points to prove are easy to learn anyway once you know the definition so I did not think it would be a great loss for him not to prepare in advance for them.

    edit: Oh! and s.5(2) Misuse of Drugs act 1971 and s.66(1) Sexual offences act 2003.
     
  12. Points to prove aren't required verbatim are they? So, PTP don't change wherever you learn them from
     
  13. Well... sometimes the course mat'l lists some quite frankly redundant items. eg "unlawfully" is redundant and there really is no need to include it in the points to prove (unless of course, the legislation concerned specifically deals with what unlawfully means). Some books might omit stuff like that.

    Its not a big deal and it would do him no real harm to learn his points to prove. IMO, however, it is easily learnt anyway and therefore not worth the risk of getting confused.
     
  14. Ok thanks guys, some great advice it seems. W H Smiths were useless to say the least so will try waterstones and the library although I would rather own than borrow. Will try and stick to the basics thanks Biscuits as you suggest. Is there any other part of phase 2 training I can prepare for or shall I just stick to learning the basic law terms you all mentioned?