Any place for a bookish sort in the IntCorps?

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Oder ein Hühnerbauer... oder Maler?

Die Fahne hoch! Die Reihen fest geschlossen?
You just keep on at your calm and steady pace, Alte. Das nutzt Dir sowieso gar Nichts beim Ende.

For the OP, my two cents' worth is to suggest that he look mainly at Int Corps entry in the ranks. As @Sarastro has noted, service as a DE Int Corps officer has failed to prove terribly attractive to many of the very bright young Lieutenants and Captains who succeeded in commissioning directly into the Corps and the outflow was been dramatic. That might or might not tell a story.

Moreover, there are far more chances to do collation, analysis and reporting if you're in the ranks than if you're commissioned, as well as opportunity to become a subject matter expert rather than a gifted generalist.

Detailed knowledge of the Marian revolution in Roman military affairs and the differences and contrasts between late Republican and early Principate legiones might be handy as well.
 
Hi all,

I'm a current final year undergraduate, reading for a degree in what is effectively History and Classics. One option I've been looking at post-graduation is having a crack at applying to be an officer, with the intention of having a go at IntCorps selection assuming I get that far. I'll be the first to admit that my degree is hardly technical, and I'm definitely more academic than practical as a rule, having the general physique of a stick insect (though this is something I'm very much working on!). Obviously, the enemy won't be overly fearful of my in-depth knowledge of the political situation at Rome in 63 BC, but I do flatter myself to think that I've developed some skills of source analysis and evaluation, the processing and summarising of information etc, and I like to think that I'm fairly clued up on current affairs. Would these be the sorts of attributes -more general desirable officer characteristics notwithstanding- that would put me in good stead so far as my application is concerned, or would they be more after language (again, not sure Latin counts) or science types?

Thanks
Not sure if anyone else has suggested this - but have you considered joining the RAF as an Intelligence Officer?

You will be considered an SME (subject matter expert) AND the aviation field is in the ascendency at the moment.
(I have served alongside our Snot hatted friends, the RN and RAF - so not entirely ignorant)
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Not sure if anyone else has suggested this - but have you considered joining the RAF as an Intelligence Officer?

You will be considered an SME (subject matter expert) AND the aviation field is in the ascendency at the moment.
(I have served alongside our Snot hatted friends, the RN and RAF - so not entirely ignorant)
@Cicero63 Most things considered, I'd agree that these days you are better off joining the RAF Int branch - even frankly the Royal Navy, but that's still very small - than the Int Corps. Has the added advantage that you know what you are getting before you sign on the dotted line, which is not the case with Sandhurst.

All things considered, I'd steer away from the military at all. You will be joining a peacetime military, which is inclined to be a toxic environment at the best of times, and these are not those. A combination of factors mean it is very likely to remain a peacetime military for your entire career, going on the stats of how long any individual stays in. It's also committed to a steep nosedive in competence, satisfaction and purpose, and as a junior officer you will have no hand on the stick where those are concerned. It is increasingly a lie that you have more control or influence as a junior officer, than as a soldier. You have better conditions and more responsibility, but those are not the same. Quite likely that you will ignore this, but if you do, at least your five year older self can think "I was warned", which is often the difference between a frustrated five year older self, and a bitter ten year older self.

At an absolute minimum, if intelligence interests you and you aren't the most physical type, apply to SIS and GCHQ first. They also have their problems, but vastly better outlooks and a continuing purpose. Or, as others have suggested, view it as an itch to scratch and apply to the Reserves, where the commitment is less encompassing, and easier to leave. All lawyers live in London ,and 3MI is probably one of the best corners of the Int Corps.
 
Capt @subbsonic just finishes his Int Corps presentation to another platoon of sleepy cadets at the Arms and Services Day at Sandhurst: are there any questions?

Sir, I don't have a degree will that matter as an officer in the Int Corps?

Me: Certainly not, I only have 3 O Levels, if you need someone with a degree then get hold of any one of your soldiers.
 
if you need someone with a degree then get hold of any one of your soldiers.
My Cpl clerk at the Outpost of Evil (Drumadd Bks, Armagh) had two degrees (English and Law) and was a fully-qualified pilot of the private sort. Awful driver, though, and we were wary about giving him a gun. RAOC, mind, so he typed well. The rest of the office (infantry types) were thugs who'd probably failed 'Carpentry'. I felt very insecure.
 
Many moons ago, I was a scrawny, bookish[1], and very geeky young STAB[2] considering a commission (I fancied staying in the TA; but I didn't trust anyone else with a map, and hated being shouted at). I was an Int Corps brat, so the idea of nicking yet more of Dad's kit had crossed my mind - after all, why not? I'd already plundered half his mob gear from the trunk in the garage...

I worked in the same lab as the 2ic of the local infantry company; so he'd been working on me. I also went along, had a chat with the local Int Coy's 2ic. Lastly, I had a chat with dad's mate Ken from his recruit days (Squad MCMLXIII, I think), who was by now their Training Captain and would come to our place when he visited the frozen wastelands of the North.

The point Ken made was that as a young Int Corps officer, I was going to be doing much more admin than "Int Stuff". Whereas, as a young infantry officer, I was going to be out getting muddy actually doing infantry stuff and being led by NCOsleading soldiers.

I took his advice, chose the infantry, and don't regret it for one second.

PS If you're determined to be an officer, consider whether you actually want to lead and work with soldiers. If not, think again.

PPS I searched to see if I'd written about this before. All I found was the Biscuit Recognition Thread (link) :)

PPPS I'm still happy that I managed to chuck Dad a copy of "Agents of Influence" before the most recent Dawnwatchers bash. Caused a comment or two, apparently :)

[1] I'm a computer science graduate. With a very large collection of SF and Fantasy novels. Firstborn may (briefly) have persuaded me to take up Warhammer. I even got an A in my SCE Higher Latin (enough to remember Cicero as a boring git who never fvcking shut up about how he'd saved the Republic). Granted, being 65kg of skinny wretch meant that I suffered when carrying load, but my knees and back are still largely intact... (I'm 80kg of chubby wretch these days).

[2] Going regular was only ever a fallback plan. Having watched the Regular Army shunt Dad around for his 22 years, I instead fancied the idea of a 40-hour civilian work week, being able to plan my holidays, and not being packed off to the ends of the Earth every two years.
 
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Ah, classic. I still remember the tarpology (inside biscuit tin) and BDA (biscuit damage assessment) :D
The horrifying thing about that thread is seeing all the familiar names and then clicking on 'last seen' dates.
Have they all graduated to another, more mysterious website, which offers biscuits covered in dark chocolate per post?
 
If the military options fails have a look at (as a civilian), GCHQ, HMCC Hanslope or other Civil Service (sneaky beaky places), Met Police (or other police forces say City of London, MOD, BTP, Atomic Energy Police or whatever thier name is this week) Customs, HM Taxes etc.

Serious Crime and Anti Terrorism are the current hot subjects in the UK at the moment beats sitting in a trench watching the IGB or the equivalent in the Ukraine etc.

Avoid the MOJ as the Met Police fly in and take the glory, eat the chocky biccies, drink the coffee and go back to base for medals & pats on the back etc.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Curious if damning that nobody ever mentions the NCA as an option in these threads.
 
Curious if damning that nobody ever mentions the NCA as an option in these threads.
There's an opening for a new James Bond, fast cars, even faster wimin, smart suits, and a PPK under the arm pit.

What's not to like, plus you have a stand in for the stunt shots allowing you more time with the fast cars, faster wimin, wearing smart suits and feeling really brave with a blank firing/replica PPK under the armpit.

Shaken not stirred.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Capt @subbsonic just finishes his Int Corps presentation to another platoon of sleepy cadets at the Arms and Services Day at Sandhurst: are there any questions?

Sir, I don't have a degree will that matter as an officer in the Int Corps?

Me: Certainly not, I only have 3 O Levels, if you need someone with a degree then get hold of any one of your soldiers.
Better presentation than the officer who managed to take 10 minutes to build up to the exciting news that, in his first job as a 2Lt, his office was two doors down from Brigadier Name-Here of XXth Bde who would (wait for it) just drop in to ask him questions.

Cadets were so impressed that they were collectively struck dumb, and so intimidated that not a single cadet summoned up the courage to go speak to him afterwards.

I understand that these days Brigadier Name-Here is the Treasurer of the St Alban's Church Easter Fete Raffle Prize Committee. Just can't put a price on influence like that.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Capt @subbsonic just finishes his Int Corps presentation to another platoon of sleepy cadets at the Arms and Services Day at Sandhurst: are there any questions?

Sir, I don't have a degree will that matter as an officer in the Int Corps?

Me: Certainly not, I only have 3 O Levels, if you need someone with a degree then get hold of any one of your soldiers.
Better presentation than the officer who managed to take 10 minutes to build up to the exciting news that, in his first job as a 2Lt, his office was two doors down from Brigadier Name-Here of XXth Bde who would (wait for it) just drop in to ask him questions.

Cadets were so impressed that they were collectively struck dumb, and so intimidated that not a single cadet summoned up the courage to go speak to him afterwards.

I understand that these days Brigadier Name-Here is the Treasurer of the St Alban's Church Easter Fete Raffle Prize Committee. Just can't put a price on influence like that.

(Well, a top price equivalent value £150, but you know what I mean)
 
The horrifying thing about that thread is seeing all the familiar names and then clicking on 'last seen' dates.
Have they all graduated to another, more mysterious website, which offers biscuits covered in dark chocolate per post?
They use their phones now WB !

We tried to video call you from the RV at pub last week, but nobody had Skype installed any more .
@Alec_Lomas is waiting for you to clear the DLB
 
nobody had Skype installed any more
Antiquated technology such as that system of string and baked-bean cans has no place in the Whiskybreath household, as you should well know, Subb; for shame. We are at the razor's-edge of communication here; the Mrs gave me a little mechanism with a screen and a cable some time ago, and I dutifully and bravely put it in a safe place somewhere, where I can't interfere with its workings, which, being based in electrons and neutrons and stuff, I distrust.

I gravely missed being present at this meeting of cultural, intellectual and artistic movers, shakers and leaders, and I'd been looking forward to discussing critical theory with @Alec_Lomas, but knowing that my opinions would be comprehensively pulverised, I refrained from attending, possibly wisely. Since both you and she have 'transitioned'*, I'd have been outnumbered at being rude to waiters, loud, offensive in demanding that steaks be less well-done, and bill-division calculations. I cannot compete in those categories.

I did, though, raise a glass to you all. Several, if fact, and to prove my proposition above, I became less polite, louder and extremely offensive during the evening. I now live in my luxury garden shed, but I stand by my principles.
* I hope I haven't been premature in this revelation. That could be embarrassing.
 

Chinggis

War Hero
PEDANT ON More likely, καὶ σύ, τέκνον (And you, son?). Much more Oedipal. PEDANT OFF
<ÜBER-PEDANT ON>
The correct Latin would be "tu quoque, Brute".
Seutonius wrote that Caesar said nothing but that others had claimed he said "καὶ σύ, τέκνον".
If he did say anything, it's possible that the witnesses misheard him. Instead of his last words being Greek, they may have been a Latin phrase that sounded similar - "quaeso te, non!" (please, no!).
</ÜBER-PEDANT OFF>
 
<ÜBER-PEDANT ON>
The correct Latin would be "tu quoque, Brute".
Seutonius wrote that Caesar said nothing but that others had claimed he said "καὶ σύ, τέκνον".
If he did say anything, it's possible that the witnesses misheard him. Instead of his last words being Greek, they may have been a Latin phrase that sounded similar - "quaeso te, non!" (please, no!).
</ÜBER-PEDANT OFF>
Slime green hat off to you, sir. I was chuffed and surprised to get the diacritics right.
 

Cicero63

Swinger
You just keep on at your calm and steady pace, Alte. Das nutzt Dir sowieso gar Nichts beim Ende.

For the OP, my two cents' worth is to suggest that he look mainly at Int Corps entry in the ranks. As @Sarastro has noted, service as a DE Int Corps officer has failed to prove terribly attractive to many of the very bright young Lieutenants and Captains who succeeded in commissioning directly into the Corps and the outflow was been dramatic. That might or might not tell a story.

Moreover, there are far more chances to do collation, analysis and reporting if you're in the ranks than if you're commissioned, as well as opportunity to become a subject matter expert rather than a gifted generalist.

Detailed knowledge of the Marian revolution in Roman military affairs and the differences and contrasts between late Republican and early Principate legiones might be handy as well.
Sorry for ignoring this- much food for thought. Thanks for all your help.

I happen funnily enough to be (relatively speaking) something of an expert on the Jugurthine War, Marius’ first campaign after the initial reforms.
 
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