Any one tell me what this is?

#1
My old man found this while clearing out my nannas house, he said it was his great grandads from the second world war when he was in the royal marine commandos....my old man said he served on the fleet air arms to, but I don't have a clue what this is can anyone clear it up for me? A lot of the thread in the patch is made from copper I think.

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#2
My old man found this while clearing out my nannas house, he said it was his great grandads from the second world war when he was in the royal marine commandos....my old man said he served on the fleet air arms to, but I don't have a clue what this is can anyone clear it up for me? A lot of the thread in the patch is made from copper I think.

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This link should help: THE ROYAL NAVAL COMMANDOS
 
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#3
Combined Operations badge.

The primary task of WW2 Combined Operations was to plan for the invasion of mainland Europe following the evacuation at Dunkirk. It's synonymous with Commando raids and landings, landing craft design, training of personnel from the 3 services in amph

The Combined Operations Command was set up by Churchill in the spring of 1940. From 17/07/40 to 27/10/41 Admiral of the Fleet, Roger Keyes held the post of Director of Combined Operations. He was succeeded by Lord Louis Mountbatten who held the redefined post from 27/10/41 until he moved to Burma in October 1943. Major General Robert Laycock then held the post until 1947.

Combined Operations made a huge contribution to the successful outcome of the Second World War by planning, equipping and training for offensive amphibious operations after the evacuation at Dunkirk in June 1940. In the ensuing years there were many raids and landings mostly against the Axis forces from Norway in the north to Madagascar in the south and from the Mediterranean in the west to the Far East, culminating in the D-Day Invasion on the beaches of Normandy on the 6th of June 1944.


The Command drew on the best practices and expertise the Royal Navy, the Army and the Royal Air Force had to offer to create a unified force. Many of their top planners and experts formed the nucleus around which the Command was formed and, as the requirements of offensive operations took on an international dimension, the service personnel of many Allied countries proudly wore the Combined Operations badge.
 
#5
Its a Combined Operations blazer badge, guard this with your life. One of the old lags who drove the LSLs up the beaches had his tie nicked in hospital and wept buckets.
 
#7
Yep, Combined Operations Navy Comando badge. My old man was one back in the day. He was 18 then. We took his ashes up to Scotland earlier this year, that's where they trained, and where he wanted to be scattered. Achnacarry, Speen Bridge, and Loch Fynne was his fondest memories, was the best times of his long and happy life.
 
#8
Well I'll keep it in a safe place then and see if we find anything else knocking about at my nannas! Hopefully might be his old FS dagger, got one of his old knives here but it's a bit battered and not sure what it is.

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#9
Yep, Combined Operations Navy Comando badge. My old man was one back in the day. He was 18 then. We took his ashes up to Scotland earlier this year, that's where they trained, and where he wanted to be scattered. Achnacarry, Speen Bridge, and Loch Fynne was his fondest memories, was the best times of his long and happy life.
If getting shot at, blown up and getting thrashed to death on a daily basis wearing horrificly unsuitable kit was his fondest memories i can only imagine what the rest of his life was like ?
 
#10
Well I'll keep it in a safe place then and see if we find anything else knocking about at my nannas! Hopefully might be his old FS dagger, got one of his old knives here but it's a bit battered and not sure what it is.

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If it's one of these,


No matter how battered, if its an original issued Fairbairn Sykes complete with scabbard it will be worth a few bob!!
 
#11
BB, to be honest, the rest of his life was just as nuts. He was born December 1924, left school at 14, joined the Merchant Navy and trained at TS Vindicatrix? think that's how its spelt. First trip out was from Liverpool to Freetown to collect 3000 tons of sugar on a ship called the SS Wray Castle. Made it to Freetown ok but the convoy was hit by U Boats on the way back, the Wray Castle was hit by 2 torpedoes and went down. The U Boat then surfaced and opened up on the survivors with MGs. Only 3 survived, the old boy being one. Lot to take in as a teenager! Spent 3 days floating around in the Atlantic before being picked up by an Ethiopian cruise liner and dropped off in Argentina. Took him 3 months to get back to the UK, by wich time he was presumed dead.
Joined the Royal Navy at 17 (believe he lied about his age). Combined Ops followed, trained in Scotland, and landed at Gold Beach on D Day, was involved in the battle for Caen, and carried on into Germany.
After all that, headed for Burma, getting there just in time for the Jap surrender so didn't see any action. De-mobbed in 1947. Couldn't settle so joined the army in 1951 and served with the 14/20 Hussars in Germany, Libya and finally Tidworth, and left in 1975. Not a bad run, nearly 40 years in uniform.
Have his medals, 1939-45 star, Atlantic Star with France and Germany clasp, Pacific Star, and the 39-45 medal.
Miss him, cos he had a million stories. Makes my Op Banner, Agricola, Telic and Herrick seem insignificant compared to fellas like him.
 
#12
If it's one of these,


No matter how battered, if its an original issued Fairbairn Sykes complete with scabbard it will be worth a few bob!!
If I find it I'll be sure to let you know, this is the one I have now! I don't know what type it is but it's got the Steele and sheath, there was a little stamp on the handle by the looks of it and I cleaned the leather sheath up it was a right mess!

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#13
BB, to be honest, the rest of his life was just as nuts. He was born December 1924, left school at 14, joined the Merchant Navy and trained at TS Vindicatrix? think that's how its spelt. First trip out was from Liverpool to Freetown to collect 3000 tons of sugar on a ship called the SS Wray Castle. Made it to Freetown ok but the convoy was hit by U Boats on the way back, the Wray Castle was hit by 2 torpedoes and went down. The U Boat then surfaced and opened up on the survivors with MGs. Only 3 survived, the old boy being one. Lot to take in as a teenager! Spent 3 days floating around in the Atlantic before being picked up by an Ethiopian cruise liner and dropped off in Argentina. Took him 3 months to get back to the UK, by wich time he was presumed dead.
Joined the Royal Navy at 17 (believe he lied about his age). Combined Ops followed, trained in Scotland, and landed at Gold Beach on D Day, was involved in the battle for Caen, and carried on into Germany.
After all that, headed for Burma, getting there just in time for the Jap surrender so didn't see any action. De-mobbed in 1947. Couldn't settle so joined the army in 1951 and served with the 14/20 Hussars in Germany, Libya and finally Tidworth, and left in 1975. Not a bad run, nearly 40 years in uniform.
Have his medals, 1939-45 star, Atlantic Star with France and Germany clasp, Pacific Star, and the 39-45 medal.
Miss him, cos he had a million stories. Makes my Op Banner, Agricola, Telic and Herrick seem insignificant compared to fellas like him.
My Grandad was a bit of a hero , joined the Navy aged 11 or 12 ( im sure this is true) , probably the lowest of the low, outranked by the ships cat , bullied like **** until Fleet heavy weight champion took pity and taught him how to box . Got a DSM for shooting down a Stuka that was attacking HMS Penelope. As it was hit it dropped a bomb and a fragment ended up nearly severing his optic nerve , was medevaced to Malta accepting blindness but as luck would have it , a top yank eye surgeon was there miraculously there as his dakota was attacked en route to Algeria. He said aw shucks and whipped the fragment out and saved the old boys eye . A bar to the DSM for clearing a blind from the main gun not long after this and a spot of NGO work on the Italian mainland . The old bugger ended up a Lt Cmdr but sadly died before i was born . Prob his best passed down dit was when going to New York to pick up a lend lease boat , he found out that Joe Louis ran a bar there so as a Boxing fan just rocked up in Harlem and said to the doorman " I've come from England to see Mr Louis" He drank all night with Joe Louis and became old pals instantly , a pretty rare thing for a white bloke in them days .
 
#14
If I find it I'll be sure to let you know, this is the one I have now! I don't know what type it is but it's got the Steele and sheath, there was a little stamp on the handle by the looks of it and I cleaned the leather sheath up it was a right mess!

Sent from my HTC One S

Sorry to tell you this LJK, but that is what we sailors in the RN call a 'rigging set' - an issue knife and an issue marlin spike, then you 'acquired' some leather and made your own pouch/sheath. It will probably have slits on the rear for fitting to a belt. But a nice keepsake.
 
#15
BB, to be honest, the rest of his life was just as nuts. He was born December 1924, left school at 14, joined the Merchant Navy and trained at TS Vindicatrix? think that's how its spelt. First trip out was from Liverpool to Freetown to collect 3000 tons of sugar on a ship called the SS Wray Castle. Made it to Freetown ok but the convoy was hit by U Boats on the way back, the Wray Castle was hit by 2 torpedoes and went down. The U Boat then surfaced and opened up on the survivors with MGs. Only 3 survived, the old boy being one. Lot to take in as a teenager! Spent 3 days floating around in the Atlantic before being picked up by an Ethiopian cruise liner and dropped off in Argentina. Took him 3 months to get back to the UK, by wich time he was presumed dead.
Joined the Royal Navy at 17 (believe he lied about his age). Combined Ops followed, trained in Scotland, and landed at Gold Beach on D Day, was involved in the battle for Caen, and carried on into Germany.
After all that, headed for Burma, getting there just in time for the Jap surrender so didn't see any action. De-mobbed in 1947. Couldn't settle so joined the army in 1951 and served with the 14/20 Hussars in Germany, Libya and finally Tidworth, and left in 1975. Not a bad run, nearly 40 years in uniform.
Have his medals, 1939-45 star, Atlantic Star with France and Germany clasp, Pacific Star, and the 39-45 medal.
Miss him, cos he had a million stories. Makes my Op Banner, Agricola, Telic and Herrick seem insignificant compared to fellas like him.
SS Wray Castle was on passage from Port Louis, Mauritius - Capetown - Freetown - UK with 6,800 tons of sugar when she was torpedoed by U103 off Freetown on 3 May 1941. More details here:

Wray Castle (British Steam merchant) - Ships hit by German U-boats during WWII - uboat.net

Owner: Lancashire Shipping Co. (Castle Line, Chambers James)

Lancashire Shipping Co. Ltd / James Chambers & Co., Liverpool
 

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seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
LJK, have you or your father sent for your forebear's papers? Can be done by NoK via the Vets' Agency website. Also did he draw his medals? If not they can still be issued to NoK.

Not all the people in Combined Ops were in formed Commandos. Lots of other roles as well such as COPP, beachmasters, landing craft crews etc.

See also www.combinedops.com
 
#18
Merchantman, that's some interesting reading there, differs slightly from his accounts, but then he was only a teenager at the time, and I didn't start to hear the stories until the late 90s. I was told it was 3000 tons if sugar, can understand that mistake, but as far as he knew, only 3 survivors were picked up. Maybe they could have all drifted their separate ways never to see each other again?
I really would like to research this a bit more.
Thanks for the links.
 
#20
Sorry to tell you this LJK, but that is what we sailors in the RN call a 'rigging set' - an issue knife and an issue marlin spike, then you 'acquired' some leather and made your own pouch/sheath. It will probably have slits on the rear for fitting to a belt. But a nice keepsake.
Oh no thats fine I wanted to know what type off knife it was anyway but yes it does have slits, well hoops, we're still hoping we will find his Fairburn Sykes, doubt we will though

And seaweed we haven't no but I will now (or try to) and regarding his medals we are unsure the only person who knew was my nanna and she past away a month ago, we think she might of donated his medal to a museum but again I will find out.

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