any one interested in old photographs ?

The Wren is very tiny bird.
As an aside, in 19th century Ireland a Wren was a prostitute that plied her wares to the soldiers stationed at the Curragh. The name was given them because they lived in makeshift shelters in clumps of Gorse bushes.
 


More Wrens. This time they've captured a German submarine.

U-123 surrender on 22nd November 1918 so the ladies are presumably getting a post-war tour.
 
Just saw this on Flickr, nice Austin Champ
it does not look like Ireland
any ideas about unit or location ?

Given that the 'flash' on soldiers and vehicle is a harp, the cap badge is Int Corps and the vehicle unit ID plate reads 'FSS', the number unfortunately being covered by the table leg, I would guess whatever Field Security Section belonged to that flash in the mid-50s. Separated from my books by 200 miles or would probably have ID'd the flash, but Ireland in more peaceful days seems right.

Shocking drills for a Corporal who served in Korea though, even for the Slime.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Given that the 'flash' on soldiers and vehicle is a harp, the cap badge is Int Corps and the vehicle unit ID plate reads 'FSS', the number unfortunately being covered by the table leg, I would guess whatever Field Security Section belonged to that flash in the mid-50s. Separated from my books by 200 miles or would probably have ID'd the flash, but Ireland in more peaceful days seems right.

Shocking drills for a Corporal who served in Korea though, even for the Slime.
No Magazine in the Sten gun either ?
 
img035.jpg


One from my own collection. Lt Denis Sadleir, Tipperary Bde, IRA in the spring of 1921. He was killed by an ND shortly after the photo was taken. I think the pistol is a Mauser C96 but I'm open to correction by anyone who knows better.
 
One from my own collection. Lt Denis Sadleir, Tipperary Bde, IRA in the spring of 1921. He was killed by an ND shortly after the photo was taken. I think the pistol is a Mauser C96 but I'm open to correction by anyone who knows better.
It is. There were a few of them about, known as Peter the Painter after one of the anarchists in the Sidney Street siege.
A former elderly neighbours claimed to have been in the 1920s IRA, which I had thought was probably a yarn. He had a C96 in his overcoat pocket, whilst tottering off to collect his pension, one morning in about 1983.

Presumably he shot himself? posing for photos with his finger on the trigger.
NDed by someone with a rifle. P5.

http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1763.pdf#page=6
 
Last edited:

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
My grandfather, also Old IRA, regarded the Peter the painter handgun as a menace, as many of them were in very poor order and badly maintained. Most were scrapped by the new Army.
 
My grandfather, also Old IRA, regarded the Peter the painter handgun as a menace, as many of them were in very poor order and badly maintained. Most were scrapped by the new Army.
I'd thought they had come into Ireland with the Howth guns, but it seems they were nearly all private purchases by Volunteers, prior to August 1914.
Weapons of the 1916 Rising | Century Ireland

They'd never been issued, the Free State Army had probably acquired some that had been surrendered due to the Emergency Powers Act in 1922. Erskine Childers had been shot for having a .32 pistol that Michael Collins had given him.
‘Pixilated’ pistol puts in a timely reappearance

Probably the unusual 7.63 ammunition had been a factor in scrapping the useable ones; that had been eclipsed by the 9mm in the course of WW1. I don't think the C96 was any more or less dangerous than any other automatic pistol.
 
@Onetap, Grandad told me about being directed to a very large pile of assorted weapons and ammunition, collected from the IRA after the conclusion of the Civil War. He was told to examine them in detail and select those items that were fit to be fired. A lot of the weapons and ammunition was dirty and unkempt and as he described it, "covered in dirt", probably pulled out of poor storage/hasty burial. He described all kinds of weapons, such as FN Brownings in .32, British revolvers from pre WW1 and WW1 itself, Mausers (the C96), American Colts (revolvers and pistols), in .32, .38 and .45, some dating back to the 1890s. They test fired anything that could be safely fired and anything that was regarded as dodgy was put aside for scrapping. He said that a lot of the weapons were so worn that they rattled when handled and routinely misfired. He was also of the opinion that the Howth gunrunners had been conned and that the weapons were often little more than scrap.
Later, in service life, he tested many weapons that the Army were considering and did actually take up into service, such as the Ross and (American)Enfield rifles, both of which he liked, Thompsons, Lewis guns, Vickers guns (loved them), Madsen guns (disliked), Boyes anti tank rifle (hated), Bren gun (loved it), Carl Gustav M45 (hated it-no decent safety) and so on. He loved guns and shooting and was considered a decent shot. He also tested mortars, field guns, anti-aircraft guns, wireless sets, vehicles and lots more. Interesting man, no doubt, but a functional alcho all his life until very late. Lasted to 92 years and popped his clogs with zero fucks given.
 

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