any one interested in old photographs ?

I remember seeing a Machine Gun company sitting on their Royal Enfield Motorcycles?, They were in 'Review Order' it was taken in mid 1918 and was very impressive. The gunners in the sidecars had there Vicars guns at an angle of 45 degrees. Does any kind soul have a copy to put up here?
May not be quite the photograph you are looking for but below and on parade is a fairly impressive presentation of motorcycle mounted firepower ....

WW1 Armed Motorcycles.jpg
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Have you tried the RAChD? I think they hold the record of Vicers..?
That's so fecking funny I won't sleep tonight!
 
Probably. The box that the bloke is holding was for carrying the Pigeons into the trenches. They would then hopefully fly back to the mobile loft. Note the length of the grass under the bus indicating it doesn't get moved too often. If it did teh pigeons wouldn't find it of course.
Good spot by the use of a trained eyeball .
 
Look at the medals: the D of G saw no overseas service during WWI. The chap that your Gran suggests is the D of G wears the ribbons of a WWI pair (British War Medal and Victory Medal).

The photo of the D of G is much earlier than the end of WWII, possibly 1938/9, as he is wearing (furthest right) the 1937 Coronation Medal.

The D of G, immediately post-WWI:

Related image
Channel 4 (or 5) had a programme on this era recently.
That is Prince Henry, for sure
 


A Universal Carrier and a mortar team of the Indian 6th Royal Frontier Force, Italy. 13 December 1943. The Carrier has an MG42 and Bren Gun on a pintle mount. The Bren has a drum magazine fitted, which is a new one to me.

 


Homemade RAF Hydroplane used for Air-Sea Rescue in the Nile Delta in 1942. The floats, rudder and engine are recycled from damaged aircraft.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Today I was chatting over lunch with some young people, they were talking about the Korean film at the Academy awards, they were surprised to hear that the Country had such a high level of film skill
I had to explain about the Korean War, the after effects and the benefits of American technology teaching and skill
they didnt even realise the country made cars, or most of the large ships you see on our oceans
oddly tonight I saw this new group of images pop up on Flickr, exceptional quality and subject matter considering how long ago it was

 

HE117

LE
Taken some time during the Great War
A flotation dock
look at the detail on the image

Probably taken on a full plate camera.. the resolution of some of these images is astounding and is really only obvious when you can get hold of the original negative.

The film and particularly printing paper was so slow that most images were produced using contact prints with no enlargement. If you put the plate into an enlarger, it is remarkable what detail can be obtained!The grain size on these old plates was not that much larger than modern emulsions, but with large negatives taken with large aperture lenses at long exposure, the detail (provided the lens is reasonably free from aberrations) is truly remarkable.

I understand floating docks were quite common around the turn of the century, with most major ports having at least one. Before the days of divers, it was the only way of getting to the hull of a ship, and much quicker and more flexible than a dry dock. There are some really stunning pictures of floating docks used in Scapa Flow to recover the wrecks there. Can you see the half dozen subs parked in the background?
 
Taken some time during the Great War
A flotation dock
look at the detail on the image

That's an exceptional photostream. So much detail to explore. "Street photography" as so often practiced these days isn't my thing as it tend's to be about candids of individuals. I prefer these old photos. They are such a valuable and detailed record of the past and have some context.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Exceptional. So much detail to explore. "Street photography" as so often practiced these days isn't my thing as it tend's to be about candids of individuals. I prefer these old photos. They are such a valuable and detailed record of the past and have some context.
John Everret shows us an amazing collection of black and white images
if you have time check them out


HE177, many thanks I was so busy looking at the ship I missed the submarines !
 
Can you see the half dozen subs parked in the background?
160 U-boats surrendered at Harwich in 1918, it may be those.

HMS Doon in the dock, the name is legible. Would the name have been painted out during WW1?
 

4(T)

LE
160 U-boats surrendered at Harwich in 1918, it may be those.

HMS Doon in the dock, the name is legible. Would the name have been painted out during WW1?
I think the photo is in the early post-war, with HM ships back in peacetime livery and RN/German subs laid up awaiting disposal.
 

4(T)

LE
Taken some time during the Great War
A flotation dock
look at the detail on the image


The follow-on images are also interesting, of the various villages and town high streets. The Edwardian era always seems so neat and tidy, and well laid out.

I expect the "same place today" images would be horrendous - choked with cars and road signage, and all the green spaces now built up.
 


A Universal Carrier and a mortar team of the Indian 6th Royal Frontier Force, Italy. 13 December 1943. The Carrier has an MG42 and Bren Gun on a pintle mount. The Bren has a drum magazine fitted, which is a new one to me.

Are you sure it wasnt a Vickers-Berthier, used by the Indian Army and hadthe normal Bren magazine but could also use a 100-round drum. The Vickers GO,as used by the RAF in flexible mounts, was basically the same gun.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Are you sure it wasnt a Vickers-Berthier, used by the Indian Army and hadthe normal Bren magazine but could also use a 100-round drum. The Vickers GO,as used by the RAF in flexible mounts, was basically the same gun.
Nope, looks like a Bren
 

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