any one interested in old photographs ?

The four Gunner photos (ie not the one with mortars) might show the progression of a chap from the ranks (Bty photo) to commissioning (YOs photo) then to an RGA unit with separate photo of that Bty's officers. Mortar course photo would be last in sequence, as its clearly inter-war, maybe 1930s.

Is your father or another relative present in each photo?
Thanks, I should have mentioned they're in no particular order and they could all be unrelated.

I'm certain none of them have my grandfather in them. He served in WW1, volunteering and fought with the RFA in the Somme/Passchendaele area. Was awarded the MM too (I have his medals). My father was born in 1931 and did his National Service with REME in the mid-1950's.

I was just interested if anyone could identify the units, or possible dates and what that cannon is.

This one is seperate from the others above, it has "Edwin Le Tissier second on left" on the back, there's no date and I think it's The Guernsey Militia.:
ELT.jpg
 
Thanks, I should have mentioned they're in no particular order and they could all be unrelated.

I'm certain none of them have my grandfather in them. He served in WW1, volunteering and fought with the RFA in the Somme/Passchendaele area. Was awarded the MM too (I have his medals). My father was born in 1931 and did his National Service with REME in the mid-1950's.

I was just interested if anyone could identify the units, or possible dates and what that cannon is.

This one is seperate from the others above, it has "Edwin Le Tissier second on left" on the back, there's no date and I think it's The Guernsey Militia.:
View attachment 383106

The gun is probably a Naval 6" BL MkII gun from the 1880s. These were commonly used for coastal defence forts.

The gun in the photo is not actually in service. You can see that the men are simply using it for practice in moving heavy guns. To the right is a jackstay, and the gun trunnions are resting on wood sleepers, and not a gun carriage.

Its probably just an old obsolete 6" gun that is being used for training purposes.
 
. .. Mortar course photo would be last in sequence, as its clearly inter-war, maybe 1930s. . . .
Disagree with that one: at least 2 of the men are wearing wound stripes on the lower left sleeve of their tunics-an example here

1552985228371.jpeg


The seated Sgt is wearing 2. These stripes weren't instituted until July 1916. Further, none of the men are displaying the ribbon of the 1914 Star, the ribbon for which was authorised in November 1917. If the image was taken after Nov 17, I would expect to see that ribbon, certainly on the tunics of the those with wound stripes.

. . . so, we can narrow the date of the mortar course photo to between Jul 1916 and Nov 1917.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
The ones with the maxims/Vickers on carriages looks to be pre WW!
 
Wondering if anyone can throw any light on this from Dads collection. I know it's WDF, but since his time the right portion of the has been removed. It's A Riley 9, but the white flag on was up the bonnet would indicate that something was up . It had to be before Alamein, but I'm guessing it might be from the Abyssinian time in Egypt.
Any takers
 

Attachments



U-570 enters the harbour of Barrow in Furness, England, 3 October 1941. Renamed HMS Graph, she carried out three war-patrols with a Royal Navy crew and became the only U-boat to see combat service with both side in World War 2.

HMS Graph - Wikipedia
Photo by World War II Pictures

Its a fascinating story. One is struck by the immense effort, detail and resource that went into the technical analysis of such prizes in order to advance allied capability and tactical advantage, e.g. in this case the construction of three detailed replica hull interiors for the purposes of training naval boarding parties.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Disagree with that one: at least 2 of the men are wearing wound stripes on the lower left sleeve of their tunics-an example here

View attachment 383153

The seated Sgt is wearing 2. These stripes weren't instituted until July 1916. Further, none of the men are displaying the ribbon of the 1914 Star, the ribbon for which was authorised in November 1917. If the image was taken after Nov 17, I would expect to see that ribbon, certainly on the tunics of the those with wound stripes.

. . . so, we can narrow the date of the mortar course photo to between Jul 1916 and Nov 1917.
Assumptions, dont forget quite a bit of the army didn't get to France at all and some that got there arrived fairly late on in the war. Also rank is no indicator of length of service in wartime!
Still not bad assumptions considering there is very little else to go on!
 
Disagree with that one: at least 2 of the men are wearing wound stripes on the lower left sleeve of their tunics-an example here

View attachment 383153

The seated Sgt is wearing 2. These stripes weren't instituted until July 1916. Further, none of the men are displaying the ribbon of the 1914 Star, the ribbon for which was authorised in November 1917. If the image was taken after Nov 17, I would expect to see that ribbon, certainly on the tunics of the those with wound stripes.

. . . so, we can narrow the date of the mortar course photo to between Jul 1916 and Nov 1917.

Yes, I initially mistook the Stokes mortars for its 1930s 3" replacement.
 
Excellent resource! Thanks for the link. I've increased the font size to make it less easy to miss :)
It's a seemingly endless collection, a bit random, some descriptions are missing or appear odd in translation but well worth spending some time looking through although browsing all the photos will take hours.They are not categorised or divided in to sections, though they are hash tagged. Period ranges from late 1800's to present day and location is worldwide. A long way down, I found this: For blog support - www.paypal.me/Bmashy
 
Found these postcards in a box whilst moving house. I guess at least German photographers and postcard printers did well after Armistice.

The 51st Beds and Herts on parade to welcome HRH The Duke Of Connaught, Heffen near Cologne, July 1919. My grandfather is in there somewhere.
EF2B363D-3CE5-412C-8997-F27D44E9105F.jpeg


He is one of these handsome combat dodgers.
AF360AE1-FFF2-4C6A-9EE1-F218766CC050.jpeg


German artillery barracks at Wahn, Cologne, July 1919. The reverse says 106 Artillery Regiment so presumably the Tommy dropshorts replaced the Hun dropshorts. Possibly not the most exciting postcard in the world. I misread Schiessplatz at first.
AFD6B09B-42BD-4535-9D22-8A413163345D.jpeg


Frog soldiers doing farm work in Germany. Presumably POWS. Just noticed the armed guards so obvs POWS.
43F217C9-C979-48D9-82C4-55F02C4796A1.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Those of you with old Black and White images may be interested in this site
ColouriseSG
you can upload and image and it will colourise it for you, I have tried a few not always perfect, for instance I uploaded some images of my grandfather regiment in the channels islands and the uniforms colours varied badly where the sun was brightest
but some family photos come up nice

06-03-2011 16;27;08.JPG
colorized-image.jpg
colorized-image (1).jpg
 

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