any one interested in old photographs ?

Although the 24th Regiment of Foot would later become the South Wales Borderers, only a percentage of men in the Battalion were actually Welsh, the remainder being recruited in England.
Or, one suspects, like much of the British Army despite county affiliations, Irish.
 
Presumably, if that someone was a British Soldier, then said soldier is currently being investigated for that shocking brutality. Even the grave won’t save you.
It wasn't a British soldier. IIRC the accident happened while members of the Flying Column were cleaning weapons.

There was another Sadleir who was killed during the Civil War who was, I think, that lad's brother. The grandfather of a friend of mine was the chief suspect in the killing which may also have been an ND. The story was that during a house search at night, Sadleir was discovered hiding in a cupboard under the stairs. At that moment someone blew out the candle which was the only illumination available. A shot was fired and when the candle was re-lit, Sadleir was dying on the floor.
 
Or, one suspects, like much of the British Army despite county affiliations, Irish.
Most of the 24th Foot at Rorke's Drift were Brummies IIRC. There was something like 14 Welsh and 16 Irish present. This lad was born not far from where I live

rorkesdriftvc.com - Wheeler John Cantwell DCM

During the battle the continuous firing of the Martini caused the barrel of the rifle to get very hot. Henry stated that during the darkness hours they could be seen glowing red, he had to tear the sleeve of his tunic of to wrap around the barrel to stop his hands burning. The breech of the Martini also expanded allowing black powder to flash back, this caused a tattooing effect on the side of Henry's right cheek and nose and he had this blue/black mark for the rest of his life.
 


Sneaky Hun grenade launcher. Also known as the Granatenwerfer M16, Priester -priest- because of the Hungarian chaplain that allegedly designed it, or Taube -dove- for the noise its projectiles made in flight. The M16 Fired Wurfgranaten M15 and M16 finned percussion grenades, weighing 1,85kg including 400g of high explosive, with a range of around 300m, at a rate of fire of up to 5 shots a minute, propelled by a blank 7mm Mauser cartridge inside the grenade.

qsy-complains-a-lotreblogged via Tumblr
 


Sneaky Hun grenade launcher. Also known as the Granatenwerfer M16, Priester -priest- because of the Hungarian chaplain that allegedly designed it, or Taube -dove- for the noise its projectiles made in flight. The M16 Fired Wurfgranaten M15 and M16 finned percussion grenades, weighing 1,85kg including 400g of high explosive, with a range of around 300m, at a rate of fire of up to 5 shots a minute, propelled by a blank 7mm Mauser cartridge inside the grenade.

qsy-complains-a-lotreblogged via Tumblr
That geyser has a serious 1000 yard stare, it's not Bavarian Uniform is it, can't make out the numerals, looks like 98 or......
 
A Google image search turned up this photo on the site below. The men in the photo are;

Back Row (L-R) Pte Robert Jones VC, Pte Alfred Hook VC, Pte William Jones VC.
Front Row (L-R) Pte David Bell VC, Col E S Brown VC, Pte Fred Hitch VC, Pte John Fielding VC.

William Jones isn't wearing his VC because he had pawned it.

The photo was taken on the occasion of the unveiling of the Anglo-Zulu War Memorial Plaque in Brecon in 1898.

An interesting point is that they are not all Rorke's Drift VCs. Bell won his VC in 1867 and Browne's was awarded for his actions at the Battle of Kambula River in March 1879.

Edited to add that another interesting point is that the wall is built in Flemish Bond. :D

Mole's Genealogy Blog: Souvenir Saturday: Anglo-Zulu War - rare photo of 7 VCs at Brecon
Fred Hitch's relative,I think he was Grandson,was RSM on Permanent Staff AAJLR 1960.Think he was in South Wales Borderers.
 
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overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Fred Hitch's relative,I think he was Grandson,was RSM on Permanent Staff AAJLR 1960.Think he was in South Wales Borderers.
The same Hitch that you mention was our QM 1/SWB, a splendid fellow. At the same time Cpl Hook (A Great Grandson of Hook VC) was in our C Company. Lt Col Bromhead commanded the Bn on a few Banner tours.

Of all the VCs won at the Drift Pte Hitch's was by far the most deserved. He fought the whole action on a roof outside the defended compound. When it was all over and in the dark of early morning, he jumped over the barricade wall, to be asked by C/Sgt Bourne "Where the bloody Hell have you been!"
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
As part of my previous job I collected a lot of old photographs, here's some to get the 'sleuths' interested. The subject is an Australian WW1 soldier. He married in Kent in early 1919, the rest of the story can be gathered from the images. I would think that Sgt Ken Saltmarsh would have relatives in Australia that would like to have my collection of these family photos. Are there any takers here that would like to have the images and take up the task? ( Please forgive my incompetence of double posting of two images, I can't delete one without the other disappearing with it. The bride was Ethel ? of No2 Tower Rd Dartmouth a VAD nurse.
wedding shot.jpg
nurse.jpg
nurse.jpg
adress Australia.jpg
adress Australia.jpg
car.jpg
 
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Harukichi Shimoi a Japanese teacher at Naples Eastern University in his Italian Arditi uniform. Shimoi enlisted in the Italian Army in 1917 and was a bit of a proto-Fascist in the 1920s.

captain-price-official via Tumblr



An NCO of 2nd Bn, King's African Rifles in 1916.

scrapironflotilla via Tumblr
 


Victoria Barracks, Cork presumably about 1900. What's the story with the white uniforms?

Edited to add that the third window from the right on the middle floor was where Pte Cooper. G. had his bedspace on his Potential NCO's Course in 1989. Test lesson on the Square was passed on this very spot also (Right Turn on the March).
 
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ugly

LE
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Victoria Barracks, Cork presumably about 1900. What's the story with the white uniforms?
There was an order of dress which was for fatigues etc that looked very light khaki in colour.
I imagine it was discontinued on the outbreak of war and wasn't re issued afterwards, that or it was surplus Indian Khaki drill being used up?
You can occasionally see pics with troops not walking out or on specific duties wearing it, sometimes cooks etc.
 
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There was an order of dress which was for fatigues etc that looked very light khaki in colour.
I imagine it was discontinued on the outbreak of war and wasn't re issued afterwards, that or it was surplus Indian Khaki drill being used up?
You can occasionally see pics with troops not walking out or on specific duties wearing it, sometimes cooks etc.
It's the boots , I thought they were quite similar to Naval pattern for the time
 
That drill uniform lingered on into the Free state army for fatigues / punishment details/dirty work etc until a green equivalent was issued.
The troops appear to be wearing puttees while the FSA wore leather leggings. And the NCO's white stripes weren't used by the FSA either.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
The troops appear to be wearing puttees while the FSA wore leather leggings. And the NCO's white stripes weren't used by the FSA either.
Its clearly a pre WW1 photo
 


Etaples, France. 28th August 1918. A member of Royal Engineers Signals Section putting a message into the cylinder attached to the collar of a messenger dog.

thisdayinwwi via Tumblr
 
The crew of the USS Indianapolis used to have an annual reunion but perhaps there are none left now. They used to conclude the reunion evening with that lovely old Hymn 'For those in peril on the sea' with most of them in tears; me too, the poor buggers!
I put a like which doesn't seem right, but you know what I mean.
 

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