Any info on these rations?

A packet of Hobnobs.
The Oaty biscuits from Lidl taste remarkably like the oatmeal blocks I remember, except there used to be a sort of milky taste in the Compo Oatmeal blocks.
 
The Oaty biscuits from Lidl taste remarkably like the oatmeal blocks I remember, except there used to be a sort of milky taste in the Compo Oatmeal blocks.

My bold agreed .
 
Serious question: How did catching pigs with fishing hooks work?
Wild pigs are foragers so they used to put serious sized fishing hooks attached to lines in food that was left for the pigs to find. The pigs swallowed the hooks and that was it, it was brutal and very noisy but the end result was delicious.
I am sure in this man's army this would be frowned upon, but in 1981 it was acceptable practice.
 
I was there man!
Wild pigs are notorious for rummaging, so bury hooks on strong lines in the rubbish and then wait for the screams. Said pig was finished off with a sharp trip flare picket.
Current trip flare pickets have rounded points, presumably so no one gets hurt in an ambush where there should be no survivors...
 

Niamac

GCM
Where'd you get that? Looks pretty good!


I have this ration, is it the same thing you guys got issued? From 1955.


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We were issued with these once and ate them the same night. No other rations were available - well, the cookhouse and the NAAFI were shut. Hard blocks of alleged chocolate, tasted bloody awful
 

Niamac

GCM
Once was issued with Norwegian compo type ration. About the size of a small house brick including the single use stove. The main ingredient was a tin of meat. We asked the Norwegians what is was. "Don't know but we call it Dead Man." Not a culinary delight.
 
I scrounged a case of US one man C Ration packs from some SEALS who were visiting RM Poole in the mid-70s. Was very surprised to find a ration of 3 cigarettes in each pack. When I did an exercise with the US Marines a few years later, the ciggies were no longer issued. I can remember 10 man packs in the late 60s have big tins of loose tea and tins of condensed milk to go with it. In later issues of 10 man packs they had been replaced by tea bags and powdered milk. Arctic ration packs had a number of easy-to-use items, including dried fruit and nuts, oatmeal and a chocolate drink, which, if all cooked together in a mess tin formed a very powerful 'porridge' which the bootnecks christened 'cold start'. I have fond memories of AMF exercises with the Italians where in exchange for a rank badge or union jack shoulder patch, you'd get a small bottle of red wine from their ration packs.
 
When I first retired I went through a phase of reading many books about the Antarctic and the “ race “ to the South Pole . Part of the staple diet was Pemmican because it was compact and could be eaten hot or cold and had a good mix of those ingredients required to give short / medium term energy demand . I wonder if it or a close equivalent was ever used Post WW1 as a convenient / compact version of emergency ration for UK forces ?
 
Bacon burgers separated out into burgers. The grill came in one chunk. Both were gopping unless you actually fried them.
You can buy bacon grill in Tesco/morrisons and I frequently do. Sliced thin and fried and put in an egg banjo with HP sauce-lush. Also happy to munch the odd slice 'raw'. Love it. (also goes well diced and fried in an ommelette)
 
Wild pigs are foragers so they used to put serious sized fishing hooks attached to lines in food that was left for the pigs to find. The pigs swallowed the hooks and that was it, it was brutal and very noisy but the end result was delicious.
I am sure in this man's army this would be frowned upon, but in 1981 it was acceptable practice.
Thanks for that, I was wondering as there are millions of wild pigs over here.
 
When I first retired I went through a phase of reading many books about the Antarctic and the “ race “ to the South Pole . Part of the staple diet was Pemmican because it was compact and could be eaten hot or cold and had a good mix of those ingredients required to give short / medium term energy demand . I wonder if it or a close equivalent was ever used Post WW1 as a convenient / compact version of emergency ration for UK forces ?
Pretty sure I've read of Pemmican appearing in the rations in a first hand account by a WW2 officer. Can't place where though.
 
I was in junior leaders in 87 and we were issued them a lot on ex. Hated them as you had to actually use your mess tins to cook them in and they made a right mess for far too much effort.
All dehydrated foods, and this was back in the day when the army had silly ideas like you could get by on a couple of pints of water a day, so really dug into your 'ration' of water if you were nowhere near a water source.
The training team recognised that the things were going to take a shitload of water to rehydrate and left caches of jerrycans. Was still a pain in the arse- literally actually as another detail I remember was the subsequent shitting of breeze blocks.
 
From the 50s, most ORP was assembled by the Navy Victualling Yard at Botley.. (nothing, as far as I am aware to do with Botulism!). The Navy was the lead service for rations in the post war era as they needed packed rations for the ships. These rations came in several forms:

24 Hour Pack which came in three paper bags packed in a card box. These were designed for NW Europe and were based on tinned items and a mixture of custom and commercial items including tube jam and condensed milk. A Hexi stove was on issue at a scale of one per two rations. Water was needed to create drinks, but not for the main items.

Assault Rations which came in a polythene bag and were based on dehydrated items. These were designed for minimum weight, but required a considerable quantity of water to reconstitute. They were originally developed for operations in Malaya and the Far East where long duration patrolling was the norm.

4 Man Rations were based on larger tinned items and were designed to be shared by the crew of a vehicle.

10 Man Rations were again tinned, but designed for situations where collective feeding was in use.

There was also an additional scale of rations based on large catering size tins which were issued to large collective feeding facilities, base areas, ships and airfields.

The longest shelf lives of ration items that I was aware of were gas packed biscuits in 25lb tins. These were basically Biscuits Brown in paper wraps of five packed in tins filled, I think, with nitrogen. They had a shelf life of 25 years. I tried to palm off a load from the Aldershot Supply Depot to the Vets at Melton, who declared they were not fit for canine consumption.. so there you go!

The only wartime dated ration items I came across was Issue Rum in stoneware bottles in baskets!
Spot on HE, the dehydrated rations weren't too bad if one had lots of water. In Borneo we were normally issued Australian 24 hour packs (they were good) though for a couple of 14 day patrols we were issued the Brit dehydrated packs... in higher altitudes where there was little water... someone mentioned pemmican... the dehydrated beef blocks were even chewier!
 
Wild pigs are foragers so they used to put serious sized fishing hooks attached to lines in food that was left for the pigs to find. The pigs swallowed the hooks and that was it, it was brutal and very noisy but the end result was delicious.
I am sure in this man's army this would be frowned upon, but in 1981 it was acceptable practice.
I remember dispatching a couple with a double tap from a Bren when Crab Air couldn't/wouldn't resupply us because it was raining... and the odd Gibbon with a shotgun... the squeamish were given the forearm complete with hand to eat!
 
I scrounged a case of US one man C Ration packs from some SEALS who were visiting RM Poole in the mid-70s. Was very surprised to find a ration of 3 cigarettes in each pack. When I did an exercise with the US Marines a few years later, the ciggies were no longer issued. I can remember 10 man packs in the late 60s have big tins of loose tea and tins of condensed milk to go with it. In later issues of 10 man packs they had been replaced by tea bags and powdered milk. Arctic ration packs had a number of easy-to-use items, including dried fruit and nuts, oatmeal and a chocolate drink, which, if all cooked together in a mess tin formed a very powerful 'porridge' which the bootnecks christened 'cold start'. I have fond memories of AMF exercises with the Italians where in exchange for a rank badge or union jack shoulder patch, you'd get a small bottle of red wine from their ration packs.
Somebody nicked two of your coffin nails from your US C ration pack because they were issued in little packs of 5 back in the day They were as dry as straw too and flared up when you lit a match and tried to light one. All that time spent in storage wasn't good for them. When the C-rats were phased out in 1979 and replaced by the LRRP and the MRE, the cigarettes were taken out Health and safety reasons were cited probably.
 
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As to WW II rations in the US, in 1965-1966 I was eating C Rations that had been canned in 1943 and 1944.
Not all were tasty but I never heard of anyone getting sick from them.
The non-smokers saved their ciggies and when they were issued a pack with the deservedly hated "ham with lima beans" could swap the ciggies with a smoker who had been issued the meal with a can of baked beans and Vienna sausages.
 
You can buy bacon grill in Tesco/morrisons and I frequently do. Sliced thin and fried and put in an egg banjo with HP sauce-lush. Also happy to munch the odd slice 'raw'. Love it. (also goes well diced and fried in an ommelette)
Try B&Ms or the like for a more authentic experience, I find the major supermarket stuff a bit too processed (and possibly designed for human consumption) as opposed to the 'rougher' bacon grill in the rat pack. It was less greasy cold as well but always lush.

OP you mentioned biscuits fruit, these were in green foil and were like a lovely thick garibaldi. At some point in the early 90s they were replaced by biscuits fruit AB which were the inedible biscuits brown with fragments of 'fruit' in them. Green foil again when they first came out to disguise what they were and give a little morale crush when you couldn't recall if AB was the crap one or the nice one.
I'm sure that this had nothing at all to do with cost cutting:rolleyes:

I believe that both (brown and fruit AB) are freely available at training areas across the UK where they live at the bottom of filled in fire trenches
 
On exercise (late 80s) we were repeatedly given the arctic rations. Which wouldn't have been so bad if we hadn't been restricted to just one water bottle a day! You would use up the majority of your water just to re-hydrate the rice and dried peas.

Never was able to find out if the 1 water bottle rule was legit or just the SQMS being lazy.
 

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