Any idea what this stone is?

Stinkhole

Clanker
I was going through some of my Grandas old tools & opened a box that I thought contained a whet stone
EBF6739D-27E7-45DC-BCF7-C375900E511D.jpeg

It’s more like a kind of marble & not like any sharpening stone I’ve seen before. Any stone experts in here?
 
It's grey.

Hope this helps.
 
I was going through some of my Grandas old tools & opened a box that I thought contained a whet stoneView attachment 610743
It’s more like a kind of marble & not like any sharpening stone I’ve seen before. Any stone experts in here?

Given the assembly and implied dimensions, I would say it would be difficult to classify it as anything other than a sharpening stone.

Sharpening stones come in many different grits, and the finer ones feel a lot like marble to the hand because they are used at the final polishing stage and so a rough abrasive surface is not needed.
 

TamH70

MIA
Given the assembly and implied dimensions, I would say it would be difficult to classify it as anything other than a sharpening stone.

Sharpening stones come in many different grits, and the finer ones feel a lot like marble to the hand because they are used at the final polishing stage and so a rough abrasive surface is not needed.

I think you're onto something there. It looks to me very much like the final stage sharpening stone one would use to put the finest edge on a bit of cutlery.

eta

And if it's from a known brand, it may be quite valuable as well. Tool Porn addicts collect that kind of stuff.
 
Yup, agree it's a fine grade stone, oil or water. Might be Japanese, Arkansas is a bit bluer and softer, the Japanese stuff usually has a greenish tinge. As high as 10000 grit.

Good to get a fine edge on the blade before stropping to remove the final burr for razor sharpness.
 

Stinkhole

Clanker
Thanks folks. Never seen one as fine before. Here was me hoping Granda had smuggled some Jade back in his toolbox from his time working in Singapore!
 
Thanks folks. Never seen one as fine before. Here was me hoping Granda had smuggled some Jade back in his toolbox from his time working in Singapore!
Well, as they say on the Antiques Roadshow " It's not the cash value...it's what it means to you"
Which of course is an utter load of patronising "Yer stuff is worthless shit...now F off" crap.
 
I was going through some of my Grandas old tools & opened a box that I thought contained a whet stoneView attachment 610743
It’s more like a kind of marble & not like any sharpening stone I’ve seen before. Any stone experts in here?
If that is what I think it is be happy .
It may be an exceptionally large and expensive Arcansaw stone for honeing hard metal
 

Endoscope

LE
Book Reviewer
I would concur on the fine Japanese finishing stone. I have one, they almost don't look like they'll sharpen anything. Do not use any oil on it, water only
 

philc

LE
I was going through some of my Grandas old tools & opened a box that I thought contained a whet stoneView attachment 610743
It’s more like a kind of marble & not like any sharpening stone I’ve seen before. Any stone experts in here?

Was your Grandfather a professional carpenter, not a bit of DIY, I have my grandfathers stone, he used it for his planes and chisels, not as fine as that one, I use it for kitchen knives and penknives, and use olive oil, works fine.
 

Stinkhole

Clanker
Was your Grandfather a professional carpenter, not a bit of DIY, I have my grandfathers stone, he used it for his planes and chisels, not as fine as that one, I use it for kitchen knives and penknives, and use olive oil, works fine.
He worked in the dockyards. Going to get the kitchen knives out & give it a go! The stone does smell “oily”.
 

TamH70

MIA
He worked in the dockyards. Going to get the kitchen knives out & give it a go! The stone does smell “oily”.

Don't use the fine stone you pictured first. Use your coarser ones, then follow up with it.
 
Might want to give it a clean. If you have Ajax/Vim or other scouring powders, use a bit of that with a wet sponge. Wipe off well, allow to dry then use good quality machine oil, just a drop or two, or a dribble of water when sharpening. Go forward into the edge as you would cut, back to tip and keep the angle constant once you've set it on a guide or freehand.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Don't use the fine stone you pictured first. Use your coarser ones, then follow up with it.


spoilsport, I was hoping for a report that after three days work, nothing has happened
 

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