Any contacts in plumbing world for work experience

Alright gents,

I'm in my resettlement and currently doing a diploma in plumbing. I can bump this up to an NVQ if I can get a plumber to take me on for some work experience/placement.

If you know of anyone in the Plymouth/South west area who would be willing to take me on (FOR FREE!) I'd be forever thankful.

It's a win win, they'd get to drink brews and scran on biscuits all day while I do the shit jobs involved.

Cheers.
 
You need to speak to @MrBane, he‘s highly skilled in the building trades.
 
I'm so sorry, I see postcards with this in every time I go to the plumber's /sparkies outlets. But, the pro's get a double-whammy: explain what to do, demonstrate it slow-time, leave you to do the work, go off and do their own work, come back to double-check. Sure, your work's fine but all this chews into their working day as a financial loss.
Can you offer them an incentive above brew-bitch?
 
That's a valid point and I can fully understand why so many are reluctant. I guess it's who you know not what you know in the construction field to kick start a new career.
 
I once changed a tap washer and I would love to pass on my plumbing skills to the next generation of plumbers but sadly, I currently have no vacancy for an apprentice right now. Sorry.
 
You need to speak to @MrBane, he‘s highly skilled in the building trades.
He died in a tragic accident... I believe that he drove a nail into a mains cable in the wall whilst nailing new wallpaper up. The very loud bang and taser-like severe electric shock caused him to fall from the very top of his skirting board ladder and land face down in a 10 litre tub of Home Bargains magnolia emulsion where he sadly drowned.

Fortunately, he didn’t suffer in the ensuing electrical fire and resultant gas explosion that completely demolished his holiday let. RIP @MrBane.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Maybe @Joshua Slocum has some ideas.
The British Leg Iron used to send peeps to me for a few weeks training, not sure if they still do it
best bet is to visit a plumbers merchants and ask a few of the older plumbers, they often need a hand and have much skill to impart, especially semi retired ones
many of the young ones can be a trifle cack handed and impatient
check out the condition of the van, if the dash is covered with layers of crap, the plumber is crap
if the van is clean and tidy, dont matter how old, but the dash is clean, seats and cab clean, paperwork neat, then get a look inside the back
if everything is laid out shipshape and bristol fashion hes yer man
I have seen one or two with new vans, shelving made of MDF all bowed and wonky, crap everywhere tools everywhere and stuff spilling on the road
in every case their work was shite
their attitude was shite
and you wont learn anything of use from them
 
Alright gents,

I'm in my resettlement and currently doing a diploma in plumbing. I can bump this up to an NVQ if I can get a plumber to take me on for some work experience/placement.

If you know of anyone in the Plymouth/South west area who would be willing to take me on (FOR FREE!) I'd be forever thankful.

It's a win win, they'd get to drink brews and scran on biscuits all day while I do the shit jobs involved.

Cheers.
I know it is difficult to get practical experience with plumbing, been there.

Best I can offer, as I am not in the UK anymore, is to point you at this lot. Contact the local branch, they usually have pub/working mens club based meetings every month. The local branch officers may be able to help you out.


Out of interest what have you learnt on your diploma course?
 
An old story but one that is still relevant

I have mate who is a plumber (a highly successful one) who says he used to always get squaddies (his business is in the Farnborough/Aldershot area) thinking their short courses are on par with the blokes who have done a few years apprenticeships.
 
An old story but one that is still relevant

I have mate who is a plumber (a highly successful one) who says he used to always get squaddies (his business is in the Farnborough/Aldershot area) thinking their short courses are on par with the blokes who have done a few years apprenticeships.
It depends on what you are in to, yes certainly the greater breadth of experience you have the better it is. Blokes tend to gravitate to what they feel most comfortable doing be it general plumbing with not too much depth, new house installs, commercial work, lead work for roof's and historical buildings, drainage, kitchen installs, bathroom installs, central heating, or emergency call out work at 04.00hrs.

I did a full-time college based city and guilds basic and then advanced with lots of practical work at college and on the properties I was fixing up. The college chap used to come out and look at what I was doing on my houses and gave me credit for those, I also used to go and help a local plumber for free on and off just to get the experience. Alongside the basic plumbing I did the gas course, followed by all the testing to get CORGI certification for boilers, cookers and gas fires. I did a shed load of manufacturers courses for boilers and underfloor heating systems and also picked up the WRAS and unvented certificates to allow me to install those.

I met a chap on a couple of heating control courses I attended and he ran a very successful midlands based emergency call out plumbing company. His thinking was that all his blokes needed to be able to do was know how to find the mains shut off, solder a fitting and fit a ball-o-fix - around 15 years ago his blokes were earning 30K - 40K a year.

But, IMHO, you still need the City & Guilds to give a basic overall understanding of the whole subject before moving into the area you want to work in.
 
@Shaw41989 contact these two organisations, who should know people local to you.


 
@Effendi

Thanks, I'll give them a look into. I've not yet started the diploma yet. Currently on on intro to plumbing course which is pretty much level 2 standard. It's mostly hands on at the moment, bending pipes, soldering etc. They said by the end we should be able to fit a bathroom suite. The diploma is theory heavy apparently and not much practical. Steep learning curve so far.
 
A young lad rang me a while ago for experience......

I was getting to the end of my working career, with knackered knees etc so I gave him a go.

He'd done a similar course to you.

His experience was fair in some ways, but there were gaping holes in other aspects, eg no idea about knocking holes through walls, and repairing them afterwards, repairing plaster, taking up floorboards etc etc.

He didn't make the job go faster, had to stand over him, but the plus side, was humping heavy gear about, so it was OK with me, no more work done, but I wasn't so tired at the end of the day.

He worked for free, although I gave him quite a lot of tools as compensation.

It's a long hard slog to get even semi- competent...... if you can, someone like me is worth getting, good luck.
 
@Charlie4 - cheers, I'll have a look at them two sites.

@vinniethemanxcat- that's all good to know. I dont think I'd be a burden as I'm quite proactive and would help alot, like the lad you took on. Yeah I wont have a clue on certain aspects as you mentioned but hopefully someone could do with the extra pair of hands.

It's a tough job this, preparing for civvy street haha!
 
It's a tough job this, preparing for civvy street haha!
It is, but worth it, and you're on the right track.

My cousin was an engineer (Civvy) worked for the same company for 18 years until made redundant. He was unemployed for 6 months until the job centre chucked him on a 6 month intensive gas engineer course, he's never looked back.

Every job centre has a forces advocate, give your local one a call and ask them if any company are looking for trainees/apprentices/help.
 
@Charlie4 - cheers, I'll have a look at them two sites.

@vinniethemanxcat- that's all good to know. I dont think I'd be a burden as I'm quite proactive and would help alot, like the lad you took on. Yeah I wont have a clue on certain aspects as you mentioned but hopefully someone could do with the extra pair of hands.

It's a tough job this, preparing for civvy street haha!
@Shaw41989 pay attention to what @vinniethemanxcat said about making holes in things and making good afterwards.

I was pointed at a favour job for a friend, of a friend, whilst I was competent, but still learning. Nothing complicated, just putting in a washing machine and tumble dryer. I felt a right twat though when the person I was doing it for said, "are'nt you going to make the wall good.......I pointed out to them it was a favour. However, lesson learnt, I pootled off to the local college and did a quick plastering course couple of evenings a week for 5 weeks and a 6 month bricky course. Both useful to me for fixing up places, but also very useful for making good after making holes without needing to get in a bricky or plasterer.
 

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