Anti-Depressants

#1
Can anyone advise me on the likelihood of a TA soldier who is currently taking anti-depressants being mobilised?

Is someone in this position obliged to tell their unit? Would they fail a pre-deployment medical? (i.e. would it be found out before they deployed) Or would it be a grounds to appeal against deployment?

Thanks in advance.
 
#3
I'm sure the army would mind giving a loaded weapon to someone on anti-depressants. It doesnt seem to have a suicide problem at the moment!
 
#5
I think that honesty is the best policy, it depends what the problem is and the medication and how both the individual & unit is with deployment. If your off your face on meds then clearly you should not be near live ammo or in any environment where split second decisons are made. If your in an admin/support role then as long as the MO and CO is happy and more importantly your fiance is happy I don't see a problem. A deployment and change of scenery and a challenge is probably far better than taking medication. Good look anyway, hope the problem is only a temporary one.
 
#6
There are light ones and heavy ones that render you almost catatonic in a mickey mouse kind of way. 58_Pattern is totaly correct keep it open - and make sure he tells them.
 
#7
Or if you are on light antidepressents, have you considered St John's Wort?

Speak to the person who is treating your depression about those, as I found those actually worked better than the medication I was prescribed by the GP. If they work, then you can self-medicate, as they are over the counter items, that can be bought from Boots.

I actually found this method worked for me, as I felt more involved in my own treatment. All though of course everybody is different.

Although if you do not want to go, then I would have thought that would be grounds to appeal. Although I did know an individual (a regular) who was labled 'tempermentaly unsuitable for military service', but the unit still tried to deploy him, until he went AWOL.
 
#8
They must be light ones as she certainly isnt catatonic, but in my opinion shes not quite herself either.

To be honest with you (I dont know if you have read any of my previous posts) I really dont want her to go, this is just one of the reasons.

Im hoping to hear that this would make her unsuitable to go out, or that it would give her grounds to appeal if she is mobilised.
 
#9
what if she is CDT'd at Chilwell?
 
#12
We have had that conversation, and although she would like to go she is taking account of my concerns and says she will not go if the decision is hers. She has already asked to be deployed now though, and i am hoping that the fact she is taking anti-depressants will be enough to stop her from having to go.
 
#13
SF said:
Can anyone advise me on the likelihood of a TA soldier who is currently taking anti-depressants being mobilised?

Is someone in this position obliged to tell their unit? Would they fail a pre-deployment medical? (i.e. would it be found out before they deployed)
amazing__lobster said:
Filbert Fox said:
what if she is CDT'd at Chilwell?
Do they test for St Johns Wort? It's not a prescription drug, and one could always say it is a preventative measure.
:roll:
 
#14
Filbert Fox said:
SF said:
Can anyone advise me on the likelihood of a TA soldier who is currently taking anti-depressants being mobilised?

Is someone in this position obliged to tell their unit? Would they fail a pre-deployment medical? (i.e. would it be found out before they deployed)
amazing__lobster said:
Filbert Fox said:
what if she is CDT'd at Chilwell?
Do they test for St Johns Wort? It's not a prescription drug, and one could always say it is a preventative measure.
:roll:
:oops: :oops: :oops:
 
#15
Current policy recommends some limitations regarding weapons handling while a soldier is on antidepressants. Again it depends on what she's on, and her medical history and origins of the depression. Also, certain brands are 'preferred' by the Army, such as Cipramil, a widely prescribed SSRI. A sympathetic GP outside the Army would be a good first point of contact to discuss options, but some simply won't understand the predicament so it can pay to shop around.
 
#16
SF

The fact that your partner is on Anti-Depressants is enough to make me wonder if she is really ready at this moment and time for a deployment, unless you haven't been keeping up on current affairs its not a nice place out on deployments at the moment. You partner must decide if she is in the best frame of mind to be deployed into areas that are high risk and for a majority of the time quite stressful! As she is a TA soldier she has the ability to leave or at least make people aware of her plight! As you have already stated she doesn't want to go herself. It would be safer for all involved if she addresses this matter before its to late and she does get mobilised. Its a little to late to say you don't feel you can do your job when your already deployed!! Its would be safer for all if she addresses these problems now.

As for your enquires about SSRI's its a drug designed to increase seritonin uptake levels in the body. People that suffer from depression are often suffering from low levels of seritonin. The key with these type of drugs is to keep on them and to gently come of them when the patient feeld that the source of depression has been positively dealt with, this means not only pharmaceutically but also mentally and socially! Has she sought help from a counsellor? More often a combined medical and emotional support approach works better than just relying on drugs as a quick cure. You will need to help her and support her as I am sure you are doing at the moment and try and address the main issues and causes of her depression.

In a nutshell going on deployment is not in anyone intrests at the moment least of all your partner! I hope this is helpful! All the best for you and partner in the future.

Yours
Sneaky_Barstard
 
#17
Soldiers taking anti-depressants can be deployed, but the decision to do so is based on a number of different factors. These include the level of illness, the type of drugs being taken, local risks etc etc. The only way to ensure that the correct decision is made is to be up front with the mil doctors.

Just a word of warning about St Johns Wort ....it should not be taken in addition to other drugs without first checking with a doctor or pharmacist. This is because it interacts with a wide number of other medicines, including some anti-depressants.

Jez
 
#18
I have contacted helper by PM and I beleive I have put his fears that I am a snooping journo to rest (please correct me if Im wrong helper but I assume from your reply that you realise I am genuine.)

I would however be lying if I denied I am looking for a way to dodge mobilisation (of my partner). I personally believe that there is a perfectly good and proper reason for her not to be deployed at this time, but I also have at least a basic understanding of the wierd and wonderfull ways in which the army works.

I am hoping to find a way to ensure she does not get deployed, I will pass this information to her with my recomendation she uses it to avoid mobilisation at this time (se is aware of the reasons why I feel she should do this.)

After that my part is done, the decision is hers and I will support her choice whatever it is. I just want the information so she is making an informed decision based on all of her options.
 
#19
When I spoke to mht team at grantham they said they wouldnt moblise anyone on anti depressants or other long term medications as they couldnt gurantee a supply let alone other issuses.Basra would probably not be the best place to go cold turkey .Though mind altering drugs might make the tour go faster .
Guess it depends on how ill and the role you're doing probably get knocked back at chillwell.
 

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