Another topic on...Flying Grading.

#1
Dear everyone,

I am 21 and will soon be attending Flying Grading at Middle Wallop before going to Sandhurst in January.

I am therefore writing to ask about any advice/information regarding the grading process. I realise that I should just be patient and wait until I arrive at Middle Wallop but I also want to go fully prepared as possible.

I've looked at quite a few similar threads on ARRSE but am still after any additional information i.e. by the end of gradng, what is expected of you - to be able to take-off, do circuits, stalling etc. away from the circuit, and then return to the airfield with a decent landing?!! Or is there more to it?

I'd appreciate any help offered,

Ollie.
 
#5
:D It's not advice, I've not done it yet either, I was wondering if these gents were going to be attending at the same time as I am.
 
#7
Best advice for grading is to learn your checks as soon as possible, be honest, if in doubt ask, and go with the flow.

Don't try to be something your not, don't pretend you can when you often can't and listen to your instructors.

Finally do not measure your performance against the rest of the course as its all about how you improve over the sorties and not how the course as a whole progress.

I found the first 5 hours or so a nightmare but it clicked (much like car driving) and I enjoyed it after that. There were a few on my course that spoke of great aerobatics and the smoothest of landings etc whilst I sat in the corner thinking it was all over for me, but to my surprise they all failed and I was the one that passed (plus the three others that like me thought it had all gone wrong too soon).

My best piece of advice is to be honest, be yourself, and try to enjoy the whole experience.
 
#9
Thanks for the help. I guess all I can do is just try my best over the three weeks then - i.e. sound enthusiastic (but not too enthusiastic like a nutter), be well prepared, and constantly try and improve from one sortie to another. Easy!

I heard that the pass rate is a bout 40%, which isn't too bad I suppose...
 
#10
... That's the pass rate? I got my joining instructions t'other day, and their are only about 10 of us. So on average, 6 of those will fail? That's put a dampener on my day, then. Cheers.

;)
 
#11
Haha, sorry about that! Percentages probably don't mean much though - if all ten of you meet the standard, then I guess all ten of you will pass! Alternatively, all of you could fail suppose...
 
#12
Muttley said:
Best advice for grading is to learn your checks as soon as possible, be honest, if in doubt ask, and go with the flow.

Don't try to be something your not, don't pretend you can when you often can't and listen to your instructors.

Finally do not measure your performance against the rest of the course as its all about how you improve over the sorties and not how the course as a whole progress.

I found the first 5 hours or so a nightmare but it clicked (much like car driving) and I enjoyed it after that. There were a few on my course that spoke of great aerobatics and the smoothest of landings etc whilst I sat in the corner thinking it was all over for me, but to my surprise they all failed and I was the one that passed (plus the three others that like me thought it had all gone wrong too soon).

My best piece of advice is to be honest, be yourself, and try to enjoy the whole experience.
Sage wisdom. Listen to this man.
 
#13
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
and it is possible to pass grading despite being completely unable to land a light aircraft by trip 13 :)
Did'nt work for me, failed by 1%....Can you belive it. :(

P.s. Im writing this from heaven as I hung myself shortly afterwards :sunny:
 
#14
Another grading Q...

How long is grading (weeks/hours?). Is it basically a bit of EFT or is a specific course designed for the purpose of 'grading'?

I'm in the application process for the AAC at the moment so just interested to know the gen.

Cheers!
 
#15
It's 3 weeks long if you fit in the 13 hours, however, due to weather being poor at this time of year there is scope for 4 weeks. It's effectively EFT with no ground schooling. You learn whilst you fly, and learn the checks on the ground (obviously).

Edit: In case you're worried about money, you can actually claim loss of earnings for your time at Grading. They don't tell you this, but it's true, it's completely above board, and, frankly, if you're spending 3/4 weeks not earning then it can really pinch the wallet. So if you're a Civvy with a view to joining as an Officer in the AAC, then don't forget to ask for Loss of Earnings.
 
#16
The_Goon said:
It's 3 weeks long if you fit in the 13 hours, however, due to weather being poor at this time of year there is scope for 4 weeks. It's effectively EFT with no ground schooling. You learn whilst you fly, and learn the checks on the ground (obviously).
Thanks for that - much appreciated. I'm in the early stages on application and I have been told there is a massive backlog so won't be going very far very fast unfortunately.
Is there any scope for organising a visit even before the recuiters have got hold of me post-application? Or should I hang fire for now?
 
#17
Sounds like you're very early stages. See my last post re: loss of earnings too.

You'll have to go to RAF Cranwell for Aircrew Aptitude plus a Medical - this bit is really quite simple and will assess you on your basic abilities. It's not something you can practice for, really.

After this, if you pass, you can then go on a two day Fam visit to Middle Wallop, see the Apache (even touch it...) and sit in a helicopter and maybe get a flight as well. You'll have an interview the second morning on this.

If that goes well, and after passing AOSB (Main Board), you can then do Flying Grading. That's the process up to that point.

Any questions?
 
#18
I've already done aptitudes at Cranwell and passed. So I'm doing the application process in a rather backward way!
Isn't there a 'briefing' board-type-thing before AOSB?
 
#19
Yes, there is. You do AOSB Briefing, then, after passing it in one way or another, attend AOSB Main Board. They will not allow you to do Flying Grading without having passed Main Board, as it is not cost effective (or sensible) to put someone on a 3/4 week, instructor intensive, flying course if it's not even certain they'll ever be an Officer. :)

So get AOSB Briefing and Main Board out the way!
 

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