Another round of MOD cutbacks is imminent - who would you choose to get the bullet?

No training, but I deployed the team a number of times* and never had an issue with delivering effect and was never told there was a shortcoming, so I just cracked on. To be fair, it was only one element of the role, but there was little unit support from the training wing who, even if they had been more flexible and proactive, had little or no resources.

*including a senior SSgt who hadn't deployed for years as others were to lazy or risk averse to manage his medical requirement.
The process you are describing can be very effective. My last posting before I left was as an instructor with BOWTAG (South) where everyone was at least 18 yrs+ in terms of service and not everyone was fully fit (for a variety of reasons). The point is that we were all SMEs, could be relied upon to prepare and deliver training with no supervision and could also deploy into theatre to deliver training if required.
 
From the Times:

Britain’s armed forces fight for extra funding
Lucy Fisher, Defence Editor
December 2 2019, 12:01am, The Times

Boris Johnson has promised the most wide-ranging review of Britain’s defence capabilities since the Cold War

Boris Johnson’s pledge to hold a comprehensive defence review next year is set to fuel fierce wrangling within and between the three armed services as they compete for funding.

A dispute has already started in the army about its ability to field a war-fighting division, a commitment outlined in the 2015 Whitehall-wide strategic defence and security review that insiders say is unaffordable.

Ageing tanks, artillery, surveillance and target acquisition assets cannot easily be upgraded or renewed under current budget projections, army sources say. They warn that more money will be needed under the review.

One source said: “If we didn’t have a war-fighting division, we wouldn’t be taken seriously by the Americans. Our third division is supposed to plug in to US forces directly. They’ve been warning about it for a long time: that if we continued to go down this route of smaller forces, we’d become irrelevant.”

A war-fighting division comprises around 20,000 personnel and is regarded as a strategic unit. The next biggest grouping in the British army is a brigade, at around 5,000 personnel, which is considered to be a tactical unit. “The Americans think in strategic blocks, they aren’t interested in tactical units,” the source said.

Mr Johnson promised that if he was returned to Downing Street after the general election he would conduct an “integrated defence, security and foreign policy review” next year that would lead to a “a huge technological upgrade of security forces to keep Britain safe and strengthen Nato”.

It would be the most wide-ranging review of Britain’s defence capabilities since the Cold War, he said.
Investment in space is set to be at the forefront of modernisation. The RAF has already seconded its first pilot into the Virgin Orbit space programme.

Defence chiefs had anticipated that the next Whitehall-wide strategic defence and security review would take place next year, since the last was in 2015 and the precedent has arisen of holding one every five years. As such, internal jostling has already started within the services.

Last night Air Chief Marshal Sir Michael Graydon, a former head of the RAF, said that more funding was needed to fulfil commitments from the last review, including two extra squadrons of Typhoon fighter jets.
“That’s in progress but yet to be done. That’s a function of both manpower and money, but it would be a very high priority for the next review,” he said.

“There is nothing the RAF is likely to be prepared to lose. Aircraft numbers are low, the training system is in trouble.” Admiral Lord West of Spithead, a former head of the navy, said that the government must commit to retaining Britain’s second aircraft carrier amid reports it is considering mothballing the second £3.2 billion ship or lending it to allies. Ben Wallace, the defence secretary, has denied the claims. Admiral West added that more investment was needed for ballistic missile submarines to protect the North Atlantic, in response to a growing threat from Russia, as well as more cash for amphibious assets, frigates and destroyers.

Francis Tusa, editor of the industry newsletter Defence Analysis, said: “The services always fight, but right now there’s an abnormal level of pressure because all services have come up with unrealistic plans.”
 

Beachdaze2

Clanker
Here's a thought. Instead of direct entry, why not have a military posting option offered to home office police. So, instead of being posted to a MetPol Division, the probationer can opt for military service after their basic police training is finished. That way, the military get real police officers that they can then put through the military training, and the PCs can either rejoin their HO force once their military service contract is up, or sign on with the military again.

What that would mean is you'd have a universal tri-service Military Police that are in effect a permanent reserve of properly trained PCs, voluntarily seconded from the HO to the military.
Other than the word ‘Police’, there is little in common between CivPol and either of the three Military Policing Services so don’t go there.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Other than the word ‘Police’, there is little in common between CivPol and either of the three Military Policing Services so don’t go there.
Apart from competing in the crapness stakes I’d agree
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Other than the word ‘Police’, there is little in common between CivPol and either of the three Military Policing Services so don’t go there.
So bin service plod and make everyone subject to civilian law
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Whilst not ‘deployed’ and within UK legal jurisdiction, yes. Absolutely.
Tend to be under uk legal jurisdiction overseas unless in allied countries so sorted!
 

Beachdaze2

Clanker
Tend to be under uk legal jurisdiction overseas unless in allied countries so sorted!
Accepted. But they’re still ‘deployed’ and the realities of Civilian cops policing a deployed military force make it problematic. Thread drift so probably best to leave it there ?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Accepted. But they’re still ‘deployed’ and the realities of Civilian cops policing a deployed military force make it problematic. Thread drift so probably best to leave it there ?
Nope very pertinent to the thread, in fact get a % of normal plod into sponsored reserves and job jobbed!
 

Yokel

LE
So bin service plod and make everyone subject to civilian law
Everything is subject to civilian law. Service Personnel (and sometimes others) are also subject to the Armed Forces Act. See JSP 830.

Not turning up for a civvy job is not a crime. However being AWOL is a service offence.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Everything is subject to civilian law. Service Personnel (and sometimes others) are also subject to the Armed Forces Act. See JSP 830.

Not turning up for a civvy job is not a crime. However being AWOL is a service offence.
Which not only do I know but reinforces my point
 
Other than the word ‘Police’, there is little in common between CivPol and either of the three Military Policing Services so don’t go there.
I realise that. I'm an ex Met copper. However, what I'm suggesting is a common HO based training stream, that would benefit all involved. That way, Monkeys could, upon leaving the military, step into a HO police force. Similarly, a HO PC could apply for secondment to the military.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
How can the civvy Police deal with service offences?
Simply do as I said earlier when deployed use mobilised reserve plods and when in uk use regimental plod
 

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