Another computer fcukwit - Help

#1
Sorry to ask this,

Since last Sunday my computer clock keeps resetting to the factory setting when I switch the computer on, also when the computer turns on, it starts up, seems to take a 4 second pause and then starts up again.

Can anyone help or explain why please?

Many thanks

R_G :?
 
#2
It's probably just homesick.
 
#3
Possible corrupt BIOS? Tried resetting CMOS by using the jumper on the motherboard?
 
#7
The CMOS battery is probably on its way out. If you open the case, you should see a round, silver lithium battery (just like a watch battery) on the motherboard. Note down the number and get a new one. Then just replace it.

That should solve both problems.

msr
 
#8
looking at the forums, it might be caused by the same thing.

Find out which motherboard you have then google it, to find out which jumpers control the time on your bios
 
#10
There are no jumpers which control the time.

Very very likely to be the battery, which is likely to be a CR2032 (unless your computer is very old/oddball/French). You can get the batteries in Tesco or Maplin for £2. Make sure the computer is plugged in but turned off when you're replacing the battery.
 
#11
You're not one of those types that likes to turn his computer off at the wall socket after hes shut it down are you?
 
#12
Higround said:
You're not one of those types that likes to turn his computer off at the wall socket after hes shut it down are you?
Whats wrong with that? Get a fecking annoying humm from mine if its still got power going to it
 
#13
SauceDoctor said:
There are no jumpers which control the time.
Nonsense, I bought Doctor Who's time travelling tank top on ebay recently.

Are you trying to say it's a fake?
 
#15
SauceDoctor said:
There are no jumpers which control the time.

Very very likely to be the battery, which is likely to be a CR2032 (unless your computer is very old/oddball/French). You can get the batteries in Tesco or Maplin for £2. Make sure the computer is plugged in but turned off when you're replacing the battery.
Yes I would second this however, I'd ensure that the pc is turned off and the power cord is removed from the back before you open up the case and look for the little round silver battery. Ensure that you "earth" yourself by touching the metal part of the case. The battery will pop out easily enough using your fingers.

What happens is that when you turn off the PC the CMOS (memory that holds the BIOS [basic input output system] settings) is retained by using power from the little battery. When the battery starts to fail then the settings in the BIOS are reset to the fatory defaults. The computer will still boot, but it will show incorrect time and date. (and any settings that the user has changed in the BIOS menu will not be retained).
 
#17
Garhwal said:
SauceDoctor said:
There are no jumpers which control the time.

Very very likely to be the battery, which is likely to be a CR2032 (unless your computer is very old/oddball/French). You can get the batteries in Tesco or Maplin for £2. Make sure the computer is plugged in but turned off when you're replacing the battery.
Yes I would second this however, I'd ensure that the pc is turned off and the power cord is removed from the back before you open up the case and look for the little round silver battery. Ensure that you "earth" yourself by touching the metal part of the case. The battery will pop out easily enough using your fingers.

What happens is that when you turn off the PC the CMOS (memory that holds the BIOS [basic input output system] settings) is retained by using power from the little battery. When the battery starts to fail then the settings in the BIOS are reset to the fatory defaults. The computer will still boot, but it will show incorrect time and date. (and any settings that the user has changed in the BIOS menu will not be retained).
You need to leave the power cord CONNECTED otherwise what are you earthing yourself to? Make sure the wall switch is OFF.
 
#19
Why is it incorrect if there is no mains supply the mother board will lose bios setting eg time date etc once the bios battery is flat.when there is no power to mother board the bios battery takes over and saves details but only for a limited time (bios battery only acts as a temp power source for bios eprom)
 
#20
Incorrect because:

1. The existing battery is flat anyway
2. Switching off the mains while replacing the CMOS battery will not mean he'll need another new battery as you suggest.
3. A CMOS battery will hold settings for +/- 3 years - I've seen batteries rusted in after more than five that are still working.
 

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