Ankle Pain

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by DehavM, Apr 10, 2008.

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  1. Hey guys, just wondered if anyone can help me on this subject...

    Basically for past 4 years now ive been doing weights, im 6 foot 1 and i currently weigh 16.5 stone (all muscle i assure you). Recently the army has interested me so ive started doing a bit of running, to build my fitness up as ive basically came from doing no running at all in those 4 years.

    However after every run i seem to be getting pains in my ankles, whether its the front, under the shin (which sounds like shin splints) or sometimes the back, just below my calf muscle. Ive also had pains on the top of my feet, but that seems to of gone away recently.

    Im currently wearing Puma Jago running trainers (http://www.comparestoreprices.co.uk/mens-shoes/puma-jago-running-shoe.asp), and i do all of my training on the road.

    My question is, after starting this running for 4 weeks now, are these pains related to my body not used to running on hard surfaces (such as the road) and its a case of getting used to it, or am i just too damn heavy? This really has an impact on my training as i have to rest after every run, otherwise id be out there running everyday until my fitness is a high standard to go for ADSC.
     
  2. Don't ignore it or wait for it to go away. Seems you've already decided to take it seriously, which is the most important thing. My achilles went rotten on me after a return to distance+load endurance work - I had been peak fitness for about 8 years, then slowed down for a couple of years, then worked up again to do some instructing, keeping up with the youngers, etc. I foolishly ignored the warning signs when I should have been more careful about abrupt pace changes, choice of footwear and seeing an expert (if I had a deLorean I'd go back to 1990 and visit a podiatrist!).

    So for what it's worth, I'd recommend getting it checked out now, and get some genuine expert advice on footwear, gait and training regime. Even if it costs. We have all "trained through the pain" at one time or another, but do not do so if you can get it fixed first!
     
  3. Thanks mate the only problem im thinking of is if i go to a doctor about this, it will go on my medical record and when i do decide im well enough to go for ADSC, this will be picked up and red flagged therefore i aint gonna get in if they have noticed that im having problems when running
     
  4. Thanks mate the only problem im thinking of is if i go to a doctor about this, it will go on my medical record and when i do decide im well enough to go for ADSC, this will be picked up and red flagged therefore i aint gonna get in if they have noticed that im having problems when running
     
  5. Granted, it can be a difficult decision if you're worried that a condition/injury will get you red flagged, but this isn't a heart murmur or epilespy - it's almost certainly a preventable, curable, fixable problem. If it was bad enough you wouldn't pass the fitness tests anyway. If you pretend it's not there, get in and then it really goes rotten on you, you're stuffed anyway, and in a more permanent way. I don't think I ever met anyone who hadn't trained through an injury - I swear that everyone doing P Coy, at some point, put a brave face on an injury and struggled on, if they possibly could - so you should expect an informed and understanding attitude from the experienced folks through ADSC: I don't suppose it's staffed exclusively by people who were always perfect physical specimens.

    But I tell you what: the medics were moderately lousy for a long time in correctly diagnosing my problem and its root causes, and I did a lot of the spadework myself, for which the good old internet is a wonderful thing. So maybe you could hedge your bets and do some serious surfing around for others who've got similar symptoms and have similar stories to relate. I think it's amazing how much you can find out with some diligent surfing, provided you're smart enough to separate the wheat from the chaff.

    Find out everything you can, don't take risks, and then make your mind up. It's not impossible you'll find some gems of wisdom that sort you out without ever needing to darken a medic's doorway.

    But I do think that doing nothing is not an option. I did nothing for much too long and I wish I hadn't.

    Best of luck!

    PS It would be good to get some input from currently serving members. I've been out going on 15 years. My thoughts about 'understanding' could be wide of the mark ...
     
  6. Go and see a pediatrist, they are experts in foot and lower limb mobility, and they'll advise you on any issues be it biomechanical or simply a footstrike or trainer issue.