Andy M***B Book to become film

#3
The soldier-turned-author left the SAS in 1993 as the most decorated soldier in the British Army at the time. :roll:


Dont think so.......he Boss maybe....General Sir Peter de la Billiere
 
#4
Never had any time for the self-serving publicist. Imagine it was a Bde of 2400 men he was leading, you'd be looking at 900 dead, 1200 wounded and captured and 300 dragging their sorry, spanked asses to safety. All for no measurable effect on the enemy. Hardly the stuff of greatness.
 
#5
they could have chosen one of his 'better' novels.

'better' is used in a purely contextual and relative manner.

tho, if i'm honest, i was always 'impressed' more by Ryans fiction that McNabs.
 
#6
George65 said:
Wasn't a lot of thinks McNab & Ryan wrote debunked by many experts and the own RSM?
As an aside, why is Hero McNab so shy? If Peter Ratcliffe can happily put his pic all over his book, why can't our Andy?
 
#7
Sir_Dae said:
they could have chosen one of his 'better' novels.

'better' is used in a purely contextual and relative manner.

tho, if i'm honest, i was always 'impressed' more by Ryans fiction that McNabs.
Also more impressed with Ryans fiction, although he did entangle MI5/6 a bit too much for me but hey it was better than most of McNabs. Read Payback thought it was alright.
Aslong as they dont do Ultimate Force the movie I dont give a toss, I take the movies on the movie side and blank who wrote it

Edit: "As an aside, why is Hero McNab so shy? If Peter Ratcliffe can happily put his pic all over his book, why can't our Andy? "
Because there's still alot of pi$$ed people who want his bollocks as an ornament
 
#8
I've got fcuk all against the bloke. He's done More than most of the people arm chair gobbing off on this sight and he's come out the army and made himself a very wealthy man! Good drills!
 
#9
I've got fcuk all against the bloke. He's done More than most of the people arm chair gobbing off on this sight and he's come out the army and made himself a very wealthy man! Good drills!




And some of his tales are a bit iffy so I'm told....or so the media think.
 
#10
His fiction is quite good ill give him that, B20 included.

Just one thing im curious about, is there any real security need for him to hide his face?
 
#11
Taz_786 said:
Just one thing im curious about, is there any real security need for him to hide his face?
Yes, he's still working.
McNabs books are a bit of a guilty pleasure, no matter how many times I tell myself that they are hardly great literature, when I'm at the airport and I spot a new one, I have to have it.
I've read most of the offerings by McNab and Ryan, and I still find McNabs stuff most convincing.
Its very easy for us to condemn him on the strength of B20 alone, and I'm not innocent of slagging him myself, but many of the cock-ups on that job were down to the failings of others.
All things considered, he was, and is, an extremely competent soldier. Nobodys perfect!
 
#12
I've just finished Soldier Five and it does seem to be the most honest B20 book of the three. Besides which, the bloke's battles against the MOD are probably more heroic than anything that happened in Iraq. It must have been absolute hell for him and his family.
 
#14
George65 said:
Wasn't a lot of thinks McNab & Ryan wrote debunked by many experts and the own RSM?
When was the last time that you saw an "historical" action film that was entirely factual??
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#15
Chris Ryan turned up at our Waterstones to flog his latest book. I got there early with nipper before they opened the door. The only other bloke outside looked somehow familiar and we chatted. Turned out he was a Geordie (I am a Mackem) and we exchanged pleasantries before Waterstones opened the door. Turrns out this was Chris Ryan.

He talked about B20 then asked for questions. Then he got round to flogging and autographing books. I called him names for being a Barcode and we had genuine banter both as ex-squaddies and Geordie and Mackem. I told him that next time he was in the Victory Services Club (of which I am a member cos I used to use it as a pied a terre when I was consultancy) he could buy me a pint.

A year later he released "The Kremlin Device". Without wishing to spoil it for anyone who hasn't read it, the climax of the book takes place in a mews off Seymour Place a few meters from the VSC on Seymour Street. I think he owes me more than one beer. I'd drink him under the bar, but I had to give up alcohol a couple of years ago on account of developing an intolerance (to alcohol).
 
#16
Potential said:
George65 said:
Wasn't a lot of thinks McNab & Ryan wrote debunked by many experts and the own RSM?
When was the last time that you saw an "historical" action film that was entirely factual??
Anything with Audie Murphy.

Cr*p actor, but at least you know he can walk the walk.
 
#17
Maj_Boothroyd wrote
Never had any time for the self-serving publicist. Imagine it was a Bde of 2400 men he was leading, you'd be looking at 900 dead, 1200 wounded and captured and 300 dragging their sorry, spanked asses to safety. All for no measurable effect on the enemy. Hardly the stuff of greatness.
I see your point, but if you multiply the opfor by a similar amount it would probably be the stuff of greatness, which would also increase the measurable effect on the enemy. It is not neccesarily the casualty or POW rates that dictate greatness, although they do add perspective, but how the fight was fought.

The fact is these guys went in on an extremly dangerous mission and, I fell, aquited themselves well even when the viewed through less than rose tinted specs.
 
#18
chocolate_frog said:
Maj_Boothroyd wrote
Never had any time for the self-serving publicist. Imagine it was a Bde of 2400 men he was leading, you'd be looking at 900 dead, 1200 wounded and captured and 300 dragging their sorry, spanked asses to safety. All for no measurable effect on the enemy. Hardly the stuff of greatness.
I see your point, but if you multiply the opfor by a similar amount it would probably be the stuff of greatness, which would also increase the measurable effect on the enemy. It is not neccesarily the casualty or POW rates that dictate greatness, although they do add perspective, but how the fight was fought.

The fact is these guys went in on an extremly dangerous mission and, I fell, aquited themselves well even when the viewed through less than rose tinted specs.
I accept your point about multiplying the size of the enemy, however we only have McNabs word on just how many million Iraqi stealth fighters, elephants and zulus there were. Remember one of the patrol (or 300 men in my fictional Bde) died through contact with hypothermia not the enemy.

Also if you read the B20 there is mention of B10, where the patrol commander got off the Chinnok in the Iraq desert, said "this is a sucide mission" (I paraphrase), got back on the Chinook and flew back to Saudi. He got the white feather treatment for a couple of days until B20 stopped transmitting and people realised he wasn't such a coward after all. He displayed a greater degree of moral courage in realising that they were not in the business of suicide missions and blind medal hunting.
 
#19
BTZ was a completely different story to Soldier 5, I know which one I believe! I can see now why the government tried to ban Soldier 5, as it told the true story. I would imagine most of the books are written by a ghost author anyway and McNab gets royalties for them using his name.
 
#20
There was another patrol who sacked the mission. Although I don't know what it's call sign was, and yes I believe that did take a lot of moral courage. When it comes down to it, it is the descision of the men on the ground whether it is a go or not. For B10 (the ones who sacked it) it turned out to be a justified choice. B20 made the wrong one. Was there not other patrols out on ground at this time? They carried out their missions and didn't get caught.

Regardless of how many men were actually in the OpFor the B20 patrol were still deep behind enemy lines and soon seperated from their equipment in the very cold desert conditions. It is highly likely, although I wasn't there so this isn't gospal, that the hypothermia case could have been caused by the fearsome amount of exercise needed to get away from the initial contact causting massive amounts of sweat which combined with the fierce cold of the night and lack of food/water meant that that soldier died of hypothermia. It can happen to the best of us.

It is, IMHO, highly likely that they were all in a state other than 100% combat effectiveness from the moment of compromise to the various times they were either picked or killed. When looking at this, Chris Ryans escape is quite rightly lauded.

Edit to add, I haven't read Soldier 5. To be honest B20 and the one that got away was pretty much all I could take. Is it worth haveing a look over?
 

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