An Ethiopian hero of the Korean War

#2
Ethiopian contingent never had a man become a POW and Never left a Man dead for the chinks to find. Were alleged to be masters of the night ambush patrol according to KW vets who worked with them. they worked out very simple plans for fire support and Navigation to and from Objectives. they even had a version of the US CIB redesigned for them.
 
#3
I think it was a book based on SLA Marshall's Korean after-action reports that said the Ethiopians would go on patrol naked on moonless nights - that way they knew that anyone wearing clothes was enemy.

They also had a reputation for being able to get radio comms working when no-one else could.
 
G

goatrutar

Guest
#6
That was quite educational. I didn't realise Ethiopia fought in Korea. Learn something new every day.
 
#10
Colombia sent a Bn of Infantry,

Phillipines sent a Armored Infantry Bn in rotation(2nd, 10th, 14th, 19th, 20th BCT) which was pulled from fighting communist Huks

France Obviously the Bn Coree being commanded by a LTG. Monclar, Later of GM100 infamy in Vietnam

Dutchies If not mistaken sent Infantry regiment

Belgium & Luxembourg sent a Bn of Infantry



The Canadians, Australians obviously
 
#11
#12
Colombia sent a Bn of Infantry,

Phillipines sent a Armored Infantry Bn in rotation(2nd, 10th, 14th, 19th, 20th BCT) which was pulled from fighting communist Huks

France Obviously the Bn Coree being commanded by a LTG. Monclar, Later of GM100 infamy in Vietnam

Dutchies If not mistaken sent Infantry regiment

Belgium & Luxembourg sent a Bn of Infantry



The Canadians, Australians obviously
A battalion, attached to US 2nd Inf Div I think. Also a number of destroyers in rotation, the first being HNLMS Evertsen.

The Korean war | Ministry of Defence

South Africa sent No.2 Squadron SAAF, flying Mustangs and later Sabres, attached to 18th Fighter-Bomber Wing USAF. Also a small number of army officers seconded to British armoured or infantry units.

The South African Air Force

South African Embassy, Seoul
 
#13
Made for interesting reading although I'm reluctant to believe they carrried out night patrols in their birthday suits.

On the subject of the various nations and numbers involved in Korea....The UK's involvement struck me as being quite a modest effort. There doesn't seem to have been any meaningful RAF deployment or sizeable RN commitment. Even the Army's numbers seem small compared to later conflicts that were perhaps smaller in scale and importance.

Was there any political agenda at play? or was it simply a case of us being considerably skint so soon after WW2? I imagine the available funds were spent on more pressing problems like the various Imperial endgames and the containment of Ivan closer to home?
 
#14
Made for interesting reading although I'm reluctant to believe they carrried out night patrols in their birthday suits.

On the subject of the various nations and numbers involved in Korea....The UK's involvement struck me as being quite a modest effort. There doesn't seem to have been any meaningful RAF deployment or sizeable RN commitment. Even the Army's numbers seem small compared to later conflicts that were perhaps smaller in scale and importance.

Was there any political agenda at play? or was it simply a case of us being considerably skint so soon after WW2? I imagine the available funds were spent on more pressing problems like the various Imperial endgames and the containment of Ivan closer to home?
The UK's commitment was as part of 1st Commonwealth Division which comprised British, Canadian, Aussie, Kiwi, and Indian units with South Korean troops seconded to it. Has been described as one of the best multi-national divisions ever put into the field...but I have lost the source of the Quote.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#15
The Korean war is memeorable for being definetly the first and possibly the last war fought where many UN members sent sizeable contributions, the Greeks and the Turks fought for once not with each other!
I think that the contribution for Granby was possibly the closest since even if most didnt fight!
 
#16
RN contribution was impressive in it's deeds. Smaller carriers were used Colossus and Majestic classes. Being fairly modern and handy vessels in the areas they had to operate. One Sea fury pilot shot down a Mig15 and launches/ recovery rates were at times higher than larger US carriers (not denigrating their efforts).
Our larger carriers were knackered or unable to operate larger aircraft after WW2.
We also had quite significant commitments throughout the world then. We were the bottle stop in the Med, most of GIUK gap and bits of Asia Phew hard to believe now.
Two of my relatives fought there and said it was harder than WW2.
 
#17
An Indian Para Field Ambulance company parachuted in with an American Airborne unit on one particular operation.

The Czechs provided medical units for the North Koreans!
 
#18
Made for interesting reading although I'm reluctant to believe they carrried out night patrols in their birthday suits.

On the subject of the various nations and numbers involved in Korea....The UK's involvement struck me as being quite a modest effort. There doesn't seem to have been any meaningful RAF deployment or sizeable RN commitment. Even the Army's numbers seem small compared to later conflicts that were perhaps smaller in scale and importance.

Was there any political agenda at play? or was it simply a case of us being considerably skint so soon after WW2? I imagine the available funds were spent on more pressing problems like the various Imperial endgames and the containment of Ivan closer to home?
Remember this was the same time as the height of the Malayan Emergency and the beginning of the Mau Mau situation in Kenya. So troops were needed there as well as in BAOR, the Suez Canal Zone, Cyprus and many other places. So sending two infantry brigades, a tank regt, a gunner regt and various other units to Korea wasn't too bad.

Re the RAF, about 40 pilots were attached to various USAF units and another 30 or so to 77 Sqn RAAF:

The Air War

Jock Maitland - RAF Sabre pilot - Aviation Classics Magazine

British Pilots in MIG Alley - Key Publishing Ltd Aviation Forums
 
#19
Great Britain was the second largest contributor of UN forces in Korea. Naturally their role, in comparison to the vast numbers of Americans and ROK forces may appear insignificant though they were invariably in the thick of the fighting.
My father, an infantryman, fought the Japanese in Burma and the Koreans and Chinese in Korea. He harboured no particular ill will for the Chinese but loathed the Japanese and was contemptuous of the North Koreans.
 
#20
The Ethiopians gave the Ities a hard time when the invaded in the late 1930s and an even harder time alongside us (including one Brigadier Slim) in the liberation. Their Somali cousins were also one of the backbones of the King's African Rifles.
 

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