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Amputee and paralysed British soldiers get back into sport

#2
Top bloke, and I wish him all the luck in the future.

It is men like these (and women) who make the country great.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Fantastic news. Keep it up top lad!
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#4
8O Reminds me how well off I am in comparison. Feckin top man and good luck to him.
 
#6
Well done
 
#7
Certainly inspiring to read especially after a recent car accident has left me with very limited function of my right arm/hand. Always people worse off and if they can deal with it in good humour there is no reason why I should get myself in a mood.

Great work chaps!
 
#8
Seems to be a little dusty at Chateau msr....

“It was devastating at first,” he says, casting an eye over the British soldiers at the training camp. “There was a heartbreaking moment when I got home and my five-year-old son said, 'Dad, let’s run down to the river,’ something we used to do regularly. I had to say to him: 'I can’t run right now son.’ I broke down and said to my wife Alice, 'I can’t do this.’ She said we would get through it together and that was my turning point. I had lost a leg but I was still a husband and a father. I had to get on with my life.’’
 

Issi

War Hero
#9
Utmost respect to all mentioned in this article, I feel a little ashamed that i knew nothing of the incidents in which these guys were seriously injured.
Good luck to all of them.
 
#10
I thought it was incredible that after all of what all those blokes had been through they were still powering through and training themselves up for London 2012.

"In fact Derek had fallen into a coma. He was flown to the UK and, nine days later, he woke up in Selly Oak Hospital, Birmingham, where many of Britain’s war wounded are treated. His wife Anna, 34, was at his bedside. “I was confused because I thought I was still in Afghanistan,” he says. “Anna was crying. I said I was hot and wanted to take my boots off. Then I said I wanted to go to the lavatory. 'You can’t go to the lavatory,’ she said. 'Why not?’ I asked. She couldn’t answer. Instead she took out her phone and took a photograph and showed it to me. I saw that I had no legs. 'This is how you are now,’ she said."

People like those blokes reflect the best of the British.
 

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