Ammunition Technician Selection

Afternoon all,

I passed recruit selection yesterday and got my first job choice of Ammo technician.

I know Ammo techs have their own selection.

What should I prepare for?

(My recruiter will contact me soon about this. I want to see what ARS suggests)
 
Afternoon all,

I passed recruit selection yesterday and got my first job choice of Ammo technician.

I know Ammo techs have their own selection.

What should I prepare for?

(My recruiter will contact me soon about this. I want to see what ARS suggests)

@dingerr , if he's feeling generous, may be able to assist.

However - do what @soutie said.
 
Afternoon all,

I passed recruit selection yesterday and got my first job choice of Ammo technician.

I know Ammo techs have their own selection.

What should I prepare for?

(My recruiter will contact me soon about this. I want to see what ARS suggests)

You will be required to complete a Technical Selection Test (TST). Here’s an example of some questions: Technical Selection Test (TST) Sample Questions - JobTestPrep

There‘s plenty of examples on the internet, don’t be tempted to pay for it.

You can use a calculator.

If you pass TST with the required mark for AT you will the go for AT selection. There’s little you can do to prepare, just be yourself and answer any questions honestly. Selection typically comprises command tasks, finding information by referencing and you’ll be given an ammunition lesson and then tested on it, usually it’s 9 parts of a shell.

You’ll be observed all the time, even whilst having a brew, so don’t try and bluff.

Good Luck.
 

Mech_Eng

ADC
Book Reviewer
You will be required to complete a Technical Selection Test (TST). Here’s an example of some questions: Technical Selection Test (TST) Sample Questions - JobTestPrep

There‘s plenty of examples on the internet, don’t be tempted to pay for it.

You can use a calculator.

If you pass TST with the required mark for AT you will the go for AT selection. There’s little you can do to prepare, just be yourself and answer any questions honestly. Selection typically comprises command tasks, finding information by referencing and you’ll be given an ammunition lesson and then tested on it, usually it’s 9 parts of a shell.

You’ll be observed all the time, even whilst having a brew, so don’t try and bluff.

Good Luck.

@dingerr, that was an excellent post giving sound and as your reputation tells well informed advice.

Well done Sir.

This is most encouraging to the young ones who should be able to come here and garner answers to the questions they have surrounding a career when stepping in to the unknown.
 
Has anyone been given a date for the AT specialist interview yet? I’ve been told there’s quite a few waiting so they’re not able to give a date just but wondering what the general wait time has been so far.
I have not been given an AT interview date or a waiting time. Good to know there are more people waiting for an AT interview. Will share any info I get with you.
 
There was one last week and again in march I think. I heard one of the ones last week had applied initially November 2019 so there is a large enough backlog to get through
 
Has anyone been given a date for the AT specialist interview yet? I’ve been told there’s quite a few waiting so they’re not able to give a date just but wondering what the general wait time has been so far.
I applied back last July but had to go through a medical rejection and lockdowns so completed select a couple weeks ago was just told it looks like April will be the next availabll slot
 
I applied back last July but had to go through a medical rejection and lockdowns so completed select a couple weeks ago was just told it looks like April will be the next availabll slot

If you have a desire to be an Ammunition Technician then you need to work on your written English.
 
@dingerr I'm going to be going to my selection board in a couple of weeks time. It states that I have a presentation on "any given subject of my choice". Although this question is entirely open ended, what advice would you give to the choice of the topic. It will be presented to 2 WO1's.
 
The presentation can be literally anything..a love of motorbikes, what you work as, an interesting fact on something or the history of an item or something that is relevant to you. Even something you've been interested in over lockdown.
 
The presentation can be literally anything..a love of motorbikes, what you work as, an interesting fact on something or the history of an item or something that is relevant to you. Even something you've been interested in over lockdown.
I know but surely military based items would preferred? I was thinking on doing it on someone such as a medal of honour recipient or something?
 
If it's something you're interested in then all the better. It's not necessarily the topic but how you are presenting it. They don't want People head down in a page reading it word for word. My topic was on the debated beneficial effects of daily cold showers.
 
@dingerr I'm going to be going to my selection board in a couple of weeks time. It states that I have a presentation on "any given subject of my choice". Although this question is entirely open ended, what advice would you give to the choice of the topic. It will be presented to 2 WO1's.

Choice of topic is entirely up to you, it’s not about the subject it’s about the presentation. You didn’t state how long it is, mine was 10 minutes, but that was 30 years ago.

Know your topic well, practice your presentation. There is plenty of advice on the internet regarding speaking.

Most of all, don’t worry, they may be WO1s, but they’ve been where you are and just want to see you do well.
 
I know but surely military based items would preferred? I was thinking on doing it on someone such as a medal of honour recipient or something?

I’d advise avoiding military themed things. You’ll get asked questions at the end, it’s a lot of pressure to put yourself under.

I did mine on lawn green bowls (bought a little pocket book and made it up from there).
Other topics have included
Karate
The Art of Waffle
Maps
Wiring a plug.
Cider.

If you really want a challenge pick something that on the face of it looks boring and make it interesting.
 
What's the oldest recruit you've seen starting basic training to go and do ammo tech? Or heard of? I know there's an upper age limit but does anyone actual start anywhere near it?
 

HE117

LE
Gosh.. seems like a lot of what Fluff and I put in the selection course years ago seems to have been retained! We did a major re-write in the early 80s to try and reduce the course failure rate. Prior to this, teaching branch had been packing the selection week with lectures they did not want to teach in the main curriculum, and with little or no real assessment.

We used to get them to read the old A & ER Pt 1 historical and then get the students to write a report on a topic. We used to get some real crackers! Ones I remember..

"Early rockets were metal pipes fitted to a bamboo shoot."

and when reporting on chemical warfare...

"Widespread death was incurred!"

You might ask what all this stuff has to do with polishing bullets and disarming bombs.. The reason is that the work of an Ammo Tech puts a lot of responsibility onto an individual early in their career and we need folk who are able to absorb knowledge quickly, apply it sensibly and be able to communicate and direct others. Unlike many technical trades, you are often working alone, with senior people, occasionally in somewhat tense situations. You need to be able to speak truth to power and produce technical assessments and reports capable of influencing staff decisions.

You need to be confident in your knowledge and be able to convince others, however this is not a trade to indulge in bullshit, as the subject matter has a nasty habit of biting back if you do the wrong thing. You need to show honesty and conviction, communicate your advice clearly and be prepared to stand your ground.

As Dingerr says, be straight and open.. if you do not know, do not bluff.. always be clear about where you are stating fact and stating opinion, and be careful not to mix the two! The guys running the course have been doing this for a long time, and they know what they are doing!

I will offer you the best of luck.. if you pass and you complete the course you will join one of the most interesting and challenging trades in the Army and that will change your life for ever.. If you fail, then you need to understand that this will be for the best possible reasons and that Ammo was not for you..!
 
Last edited:
What's the oldest recruit you've seen starting basic training to go and do ammo tech? Or heard of? I know there's an upper age limit but does anyone actual start anywhere near it?

Yes, ammo tech is a good fit for the older recruit. There are also a lot of retrades where soldiers have transferred across from other roles and trades.
 
I imagine (and deferring to dingerrs actual involvement in the selection process) that a presentation will need a hard stop at the time limit. Either way you definitely need to map out what you are going to say and make it last the ten minutes or whatever, maybe a minute short will be ok but not much more than that.

Dingerr might also be able to advise how you will be required to present (white-board bullets, PowerPoint etc) so pick your topic and build up your narrative in good time and rehearse this in front of someone who can objectively analyse your performance.

You can find lots of examples on Youtube and the Internet of presentation and speaking skills so watch and learn there.

I'd say try not to be nervous but we are all hostage to our own inexperience though practice will help you cope. It is the basics like not fidgeting, humming and harring, keeping good eye contact and relaxed but engaging tone of voice and body language that are as key as anything so if you can manage that, have your subject matter together, keep to the time limit you will sail through it.

The subject itself is almost irrelevant, the only advice I would give there is pick something you think they will know little or nothing about. Pick on something the audience are knowledgeable on and you might get some tricky questions.

Presenting can actually be fun and rewarding, unbelievable as that might sound, so (and this is a big ask) if you can show you are enjoying the experience that will likely impress too, but don't go overboard, you must remain professional and respectful.
 
Last edited:
Top