Ammo Manufacturer

#1
A quick question for those in the know. Who is currently manufacturing the .50BMG ammo that we are using? Also, who will be manufacturing the .338LM ammo for the L115 and the L118? Is the brass going to be UK made or will it be Lapua?

Questions asked in the hope that if RG manufacture the ammo brass prices may come down a bit.
 
#2
I think the last lot was from CBC Magtech in Brasil. .50 is getting very difficult to source at the moment...

I think the chances of UK manufacturing .338 or .50 is pretty slim. RG has only ever manufactured core rifle/pistol calibres such as .303, 7.62,5.56 and 9mm. Currently they are only making 7.62 and 5.56 and are working flat out. The tooling and setup costs for an SAA line are horrific, and you would need to be running it constantly to break even. With the UK government's aversion to selling anything nasty this is unlikley.

RG has never made .50 - in the past this was manufactured by Kynoch but is now all imported. I don't know of anyone making SAA cases in industrial quantaties in UK these days..
 
#3
HE117 said:
I think the last lot was from CBC Magtech in Brasil. .50 is getting very difficult to source at the moment...

I think the chances of UK manufacturing .338 or .50 is pretty slim. RG has only ever manufactured core rifle/pistol calibres such as .303, 7.62,5.56 and 9mm. Currently they are only making 7.62 and 5.56 and are working flat out. The tooling and setup costs for an SAA line are horrific, and you would need to be running it constantly to break even. With the UK government's aversion to selling anything nasty this is unlikley.

RG has never made .50 - in the past this was manufactured by Kynoch but is now all imported. I don't know of anyone making SAA cases in industrial quantaties in UK these days..
Kynoch and Geometrotec buy their cases in from overseas. Do RG draw their own brass? I was fairly certain that they import powder because we have no domestic manufacturer. :x
Don't know about bullets.
 
#4
Pretty sure all the brass, explosive and propellant is now sourced from overseas for all UK (BAE Sys) ammunition. We still use UK source steel for the artillery shell I think.
 
#5
Thanks for the replies, looks like we will have no manufacturing industries left before too much longer. We are going to be well bug*ered when the world turns nasty again.
Does anyone in the UK draw brass then or are we totally relient on oversees manufacturers?
 
#6
Most of the manufacturing capacity at RG (Radway Green) has been lost as BAe have reduced the workforce from several thousand to a couple of hundred. The machines thay were using were in the main supplied by the USA during WW2. The brass making crucibles have neen sold to India . There is still a ammo box manufauring line. Quite recently RG were importing ammo from India and Belgium and repacking it.
 
#7
Just had a chat to one of the guys and he reckons we are looking to re-open the drawing process in the UK for artillery cases, but still relying on imported brass.

But not sure how close this is to working, or even if it will be the end state.

S_R
 
#8
Having worked for RO in the past, I have to say the idea that RG could undercut anybody on price (quality not an issue) is risible...
 
#9
The only thing being made in Chorley at the old ROF site is eco homes and a small BAe Sytems facility making missiles.
It used to be the biggest plant of its kind in Europe.
 
#10
Various engineering companies in the Uk have the ability to produce the necessary component parts.
There just isn't the ploitical or commercial will to do so.
 
#11
Speedy said:
The only thing being made in Chorley at the old ROF site is eco homes and a small BAe Sytems facility making missiles.
It used to be the biggest plant of its kind in Europe.
In a few years there will only be 3 sites working in the BAE munitions business.

Birtley (metal bashing)
Radway (Small arms)
Glascoed (everything else)

We might still have a few bases with a few people but that's going to be it.

Saying that they are saying they will be putting a large wodge of cash into these 3 sites over the next few years.

S_R
 
#12
.338lapua_magnum said:
Thanks for the replies, looks like we will have no manufacturing industries left before too much longer. We are going to be well bug*ered when the world turns nasty again.
Does anyone in the UK draw brass then or are we totally relient on oversees manufacturers?
Eley does (they do the whole process, end to end), but they limit themselves to smallbore ammo these days.
 
#13
EX_STAB said:
HE117 said:
I think the last lot was from CBC Magtech in Brasil. .50 is getting very difficult to source at the moment...

I think the chances of UK manufacturing .338 or .50 is pretty slim. RG has only ever manufactured core rifle/pistol calibres such as .303, 7.62,5.56 and 9mm. Currently they are only making 7.62 and 5.56 and are working flat out. The tooling and setup costs for an SAA line are horrific, and you would need to be running it constantly to break even. With the UK government's aversion to selling anything nasty this is unlikley.

RG has never made .50 - in the past this was manufactured by Kynoch but is now all imported. I don't know of anyone making SAA cases in industrial quantaties in UK these days..
Kynoch and Geometrotec buy their cases in from overseas. Do RG draw their own brass? I was fairly certain that they import powder because we have no domestic manufacturer. :x
Don't know about bullets.
RG used to draw their own brass, but this was years ago and i don't know if they still do.
 
#16
talking of 9mm - anyone remember the cheap stuff we had in the early 80's, not powerful enogh to force the breech block back far enough on the SMG resulting in a 5 round burst
 
#17
HE117 said:
I think the last lot was from CBC Magtech in Brasil. .50 is getting very difficult to source at the moment...

I think the chances of UK manufacturing .338 or .50 is pretty slim. RG has only ever manufactured core rifle/pistol calibres such as .303, 7.62,5.56 and 9mm. Currently they are only making 7.62 and 5.56 and are working flat out. The tooling and setup costs for an SAA line are horrific, and you would need to be running it constantly to break even. With the UK government's aversion to selling anything nasty this is unlikley.

RG has never made .50 - in the past this was manufactured by Kynoch but is now all imported. I don't know of anyone making SAA cases in industrial quantaties in UK these days..
RG also make 4.6 x 30 ammo for the H&K MP7, which is the weapon that MOD Plod use these days.

If you download the MOD's 'Defence Industrial Strategy', buried in there is a diagram that shows the sources that RG use for their SAA. Brass comes from PMP in South Africa (although all the case forming is done by RG), propellant from Wimmis in Switzerland and primers from ATK in the US. The bullets themselves are made by RG. I believe that various other component sources have also been qualified - which results in a new 'L' number on the headstamp.

I believe that the .338 is all sourced from Lapua in Finland.
 
#18
EX_STAB said:
Kynoch and Geometrotec buy their cases in from overseas. Do RG draw their own brass? I was fairly certain that they import powder because we have no domestic manufacturer. :x
Don't know about bullets.
Sorry, are you seriously saying that we don't make our own propellant any more??

We're fighting wars in the sh1ttiest places on earth, but we can't even make our own rifle ammunition from our own resources, and our government thinks that's OK?

I really do fear for the country my children are growing up in.
 
#19
Cuddles said:
Having worked for RO in the past, I have to say the idea that RG could undercut anybody on price (quality not an issue) is risible...
I spent a few months at an ROF in the early 70's when they were still part of the MOD. The quality of the stuff was top notch but the sheer waste was sickening.
Staff were paid overtime to come into work on Saturday mornings and produce very little. Metal stock arrived from the producer and was rejected during ultra-sonic testing as it had microscopic faults and cracks in it. To keep the production lines running, the rejected metal was machined, cleaned, annealed and coated then assembled. The assembled items were then broken down (as the metal had those microscopic faults) and the metal recovered and returned to to producer for re-smelting. All the costs were being were being bourne by the defence budget. The army still managed to get all the ammo it needed and delpoy 3 divisions in Germany.
 
#20
I work for a small metal finishing company that used to do a lot of defence work,we were just down the road from ROF Patricroft. BAe took over and started their "shut everything and sell it off"progamme,and now theres hardly any defence stuff about.
 

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