Americanisms!

#3
Reversing the thread slightly; was in the States a while back and some spam who had visited England was complaining to all who would listen about "British food"; poor quality, small portions etc. I asked him if he had tried "English Faggots" while he was over there?! Oddly enough, his audience drifted away!
 
#4
And then promptly raise objections to American spellings and usages having evolved.
I've no objection to Americans talking like Americans. What I dislike is the British copying them; you don't get newsreaders throwing random bits of French, German etc into their speech, so why do they throw in random bits of American?
 
#6
I've no objection to Americans talking like Americans. What I dislike is the British copying them; you don't get newsreaders throwing random bits of French, German etc into their speech, so why do they throw in random bits of American?
Whatever....
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#7
I fail to see the problem. As someone who spends a bit of time with The Cousins (that's the citizens of the USA, not MI6 for any Dip.Corps suits reading this) I find it terribly amusing when they say "Could you say that again?" or "Gee, love your accent".

One ignores them of course. I find this happens more in places like Des Moines and Boise, Idaho, less so in the Hamptons or SoHo. I am sure there is a reason
 
#9
#14 Shopping Cart? the US invented it fuck off we will call it what we want...
 
#10
Some people get wound up so easily. No wonder they are so many heart attacks.
 
#13
"Winningest" is the worst one I can think of.

But then there are lots of Britishisms that are equally stupid. For example, the element with the chemical symbol Al, used to make aircraft alloys. On discovery (by an Englishman), and for years afterwards, it was called Aluminum. The method of extracting it from ore was taken to the new world, and continues to be called Aluminum. Some Victorians thought it didn't tie up with the other elements ending in "ium" e.g. Sodium, Calcium etc, and so bastardised it to become Aluminium. Of course the British believe that language evolves, and therefore this legitimises the Aluminium spelling. And then promptly raise objections to American spellings and usages having evolved.
Agree with you on both counts. "Winningest" just sounds wrong - even to me, a proper "Yank." Even in my school days, when my school football team (The Wolverines) was called the winningest NCAA team in history. :)

And yeah, ALUMINUM! You guys just get really worked up on that!
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#14
There are dishes in the USA that are NOT made with cheese? Wow. Care to name them?
I so want to double like this.


But then my irony meter would explode.
 
#15
Also, you guys seemed to be obsessed with America, while you happily seem to use "Indianisms" (the Asian kind), like Bungalow, dhobi (?), etc. etc.

Just sayin.
 
#17
My old English teacher opined that American English was probably a purer form of usage than UK English, as it didn't evolve much in the boondocks. Aluminum, as an example.

Fortuitously there is no English Academy, trying to maintain the language in aspic, a l'academie Francais. No in proper English style we nick anything that isn't nailed down and works, and stick it in the language.

The only thing I don't like is the pissing about with script as in 'Toys'R'Us' etc, let alone textspeak. I have yet to work out how to blame foreigners for that.
 
#18
My pet hate is the grief whoring attention seeking practice of "Open Letters".

Just where the fuck did that idea emerge from?

Fatty central across the pond.
 
#19

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#20
Also, you guys seemed to be obsessed with America, while you happily seem to use "Indianisms" (the Asian kind), like Bungalow, dhobi (?), etc. etc.

Just sayin.
Fancy a cup of char (chia)? Then theres the fFrench - Cushy Billet will strike a chord with the mumbling geriatrics. Ration card. Guerrilla War. Collaboration. Resistance, Chanel Tunnel and vin du puy.

Milton Keynes is from the Welsh for 'confusing horrible fucking concrete toilet'. The word has the same root as the Scotch for 'Birmingham'.
 

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