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America - its all a bit odd...

Local ones use a lot less meat, are often served on banana skins, and are eaten with your hands, using a lump of rice to suck up the juices.

There’s also less furry wallpaper in the local curry houses and they don’t bother with the animated pictures of waterfalls. Those they put out just for westerners.

Flashbacks now.
 
Alternative diagnostic criteria:
When you had a shit the next day, rate the following on a scale of 1-10
Nausea
Pain
Foul odour
Liquidity of poo
Viscosity and adhesiveness of remnants when wiping

My very first proper curry house curry was a Chicken Vindaloo. I had it on a wednesday night (university sports afternoon). No ill effects until about 1130 the next day when I went to the toilet and the sauce ran out of me like oil out of an engine sump. All over in about 2 minutes. Never happened again.
 
What is the difference between your version and the natives?
I haven't had a properly authentic curry (ie. in the subcontinent) so take this with a pinch of salt but the British version seems to be closer to meat, veg and gravy. As other people have said there's a lot of meat in British curries whereas the majority of Indian stuff is apparently veggie with a lot of fish stuff near the coast. The British version also tends to have a lot of thick sauce whereas the originals seem to be much drier.

The chicken tikka masala is probably the best example of that point, the original (chicken tikka) is lumps of chicken cooked in an oven and served dry. It got to Britain (allegedly Glasgow) and they tipped a bunch of tomato sauce over it to act as a gravy.
 
I haven't had a properly authentic curry (ie. in the subcontinent) so take this with a pinch of salt but the British version seems to be closer to meat, veg and gravy. As other people have said there's a lot of meat in British curries whereas the majority of Indian stuff is apparently veggie with a lot of fish stuff near the coast. The British version also tends to have a lot of thick sauce whereas the originals seem to be much drier.

The chicken tikka masala is probably the best example of that point, the original (chicken tikka) is lumps of chicken cooked in an oven and served dry. It got to Britain (allegedly Glasgow) and they tipped a bunch of tomato sauce over it to act as a gravy.

Most of it is probably that sort of adaption. Ironically the tomato sauce thing is more likley to be making it like a ragu of bolognaise than any move towards a british dish. Then there are things like Balti, which uses pickling spices in the dish as an ingredient. An indian diner may well identify all this (bearing in mind what we think of a "type" of curry may represent a superficial sample of a whole regions cuisine) but would not recognise the combinations.
 
I'm no wine expert, but I've worked out I'd rather sip a deep,velvety, rich, small glass from a £15 bottle than gulp a watery acidic plonk from a fiver supermarket deal.
It lasts far more than 3 times longer too.
The fact it's called Gnarly Head just adds to the ambience!

Re.
The Grill..
Please understand I'm nearer to your Appalachian Hillbilly demographic than owt else.
Oil's what I put in ma chainsaw.
Wrong mountains though.

I am afraid I am not even close to fitting in with the Hillbillies, I never had a sister.

F19637A8-B586-4C19-A106-F5DB530150C1.jpeg
 
I first went to the USA in 1996 before moving north, one thing that really surprised me was that most decent restaurants served Veal. It was / is still very much available to eat out and in supermarkets, butchers too. When i left the UK it would have been more socially acceptable to admit buggering the school choir than eating Veal.
 
It was at a truck stop after a long day of bird hunting,
We usually have our curry as well after a long night of bird hunting. Sometimes we are successful and take our catch (we call it 'having pulled' in the UK) with us to the Curry House. If they are a nice tasty looking Chinese bird we will hopefully take them home to pluck them.
 
We usually have our curry as well after a long night of bird hunting. Sometimes we are successful and take our catch (we call it 'having pulled' in the UK) with us to the Curry House. If they are a nice tasty looking Chinese bird we will hopefully take them home to pluck them.
The Long Branch is the traditional stomping ground, as the Hawk Springs area is where we do the pheasant hunting, which will start up in little over a month!
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Not sure, I was in Cornwall, they called it 'shark' it was meaty thick and tasty, probably some sort of dogfish derivative. Not the sort of thing you see inland in chippies.
Rock salmon/dogfish/spurdog all the same thing, part of the Shark family. Inland called Rock Salmon in chippies.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Mine was monkfish in a mustard sauce on St Michaels Mount in Cornwall. Ambrosia.

ETA This was 40+ years ago and I can still remember it. It was that good.
Back then, it wasn't as well known and underutilised by celeb chefs and so was cheap, also known as "poor man's scampi".
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
The chicken tikka masala is probably the best example of that point, the original (chicken tikka) is lumps of chicken cooked in an oven and served dry. It got to Britain (allegedly Glasgow) and they tipped a bunch of tomato sauce over it to act as a gravy.
We should consider ourselves lucky they didn't deep fry the stuff!
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
I first went to the USA in 1996 before moving north, one thing that really surprised me was that most decent restaurants served Veal. It was / is still very much available to eat out and in supermarkets, butchers too. When i left the UK it would have been more socially acceptable to admit buggering the school choir than eating Veal.
All change now, veal, or more particularly rose veal, is found in most supermarkets.
 
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