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America - its all a bit odd...

I remember the above and thought my dad was a bit exotic when he had a fried egg on top of his steak.

Of course, in 1975 the end of ‘The War’ was only 30 years before and rationing had gone on till the mid-50s. Steak and chips (with egg!) would have seemed positively sybaritic.

I can remember having Dover Sole on one such excursion, in Margate of all places. Almost the first time* I’d had fish that wasn’t deep fried in batter.

* apart from kippers.
 
I remember the above and thought my dad was a bit exotic when he had a fried egg on top of his steak.

I was on the Corps Mobile Display Team in the early 80's and did one of the summer KAPE tours. A couple of us made it a weekly thing to go out and use out magnificent NRSA allowance in the poshest place we could find, wherever we were. We would usually dap in wearing jeans, sweatshirt, and dessie's and wait to be seated, sometimes it took a while.

Anyhow; we went into a place down on the south coat, in Christchurch I think, were seated in an out of the way corner and presented with the menu. Top of the list, and most expensive, was filet steak en crout so we ordered along with beer and a bottle of expensive plonk - we honestly had not a clue, if it was expensive it must be good. Turned out you paid 3 quid extra for the en crout which turned out to be a piece of fried bread that they plonked the steak on - proper posh, steak on fried bread, talk about disappointing. However, as an in joke after that we used to knowledgably ask for steak en crout wherever we went and made saddened, disappointed noises if they could not meet our demands.
 
Of course, in 1975 the end of ‘The War’ was only 30 years before and rationing had gone on till the mid-50s. Steak and chips (with egg!) would have seemed positively sybaritic.

I can remember having Dover Sole on one such excursion, in Margate of all places. Almost the first time* I’d had fish that wasn’t deep fried in batter.

* apart from kippers.
Mine was monkfish in a mustard sauce on St Michaels Mount in Cornwall. Ambrosia.

ETA This was 40+ years ago and I can still remember it. It was that good.
 
It was at a truck stop after a long day of bird hunting, and a far cry from the traditional burger and fries


It did have some heat, but I didn’t get sick.

I'll need to study that menu a bit more closely than I can at the moment but that looks good.

I suspect that those are closer to the original indian dishes rather than the British versions, especially with the prominence of the vegetarian options. The curry dish in the link (over the rice) looks like what you might describe as an institutional curry such as you might get in the rotaion in a school or works canteen.
 
I'll need to study that menu a bit more closely than I can at the moment but that looks good.

I suspect that those are closer to the original indian dishes rather than the British versions, especially with the prominence of the vegetarian options. The curry dish in the link (over the rice) looks like what you might describe as an institutional curry such as you might get in the rotaion in a school or works canteen.
What is the difference between your version and the natives?
 
Spicy chicken, never had Phal. I would imagine that would be a fine and pleasant misery.

Ahh - one thing strange about America... the Indian food has being reduced down in terms of spicyness and flavor. I went to a New place last week ( very authentic looking and kinda dirty, but lots of Indian customers) and asked how spicy the goat curry was. “Medium”.

‘Medium - U.S style? Or medium for India?’

“haha, this is baby mild Indian style! I make you a good curry”

It was still mild, but nothing compared to a meal from the U.K.
 
What is the difference between your version and the natives?

Local ones use a lot less meat, are often served on banana skins, and are eaten with your hands, using a lump of rice to suck up the juices.

There’s also less furry wallpaper in the local curry houses and they don’t bother with the animated pictures of waterfalls. Those they put out just for westerners.
 
Ahh - one thing strange about America... the Indian food has being reduced down in terms of spicyness and flavor. I went to a New place last week ( very authentic looking and kinda dirty, but lots of Indian customers) and asked how spicy the goat curry was. “Medium”.

‘Medium - U.S style? Or medium for India?’

“haha, this is baby mild Indian style! I make you a good curry”

It was still mild, but nothing compared to a meal from the U.K.

Same with Thai food.

Thais who open restaurants in the west don’t believe any ‘farang’ can actually eat their food. What they normally serve is what Thai mothers would give to colicky babies who are allergic to chilli.
 
Can I just throw this out there as it has been half mentioned to me a couple of times in the past.

After all the present unpleasantness is past in about a year, or so, would there be any interest in a USA road trip for the membership? I am talking either Route 66, or the Pacific Coast Highway, either, or, both are iconic routes to travel.

Hiring the SUV's is cheap enough if 4 share, fuel is cheap, food is cheap, hotels are cheap, and there are plenty of places to selectively enjoy and get into trouble along the way on both routes.

Just thought I'd throw it out there.
 
Same with Thai food.

Thais who open restaurants in the west don’t believe any ‘farang’ can actually eat their food. What they normally serve is what Thai mothers would give to colicky babies who are allergic to chilli.

Likewise Chinese food. You would not see what passes as Chinese food here offered to you in SE Asia.
 

Oops

War Hero
Are steak and fries (chips for you language deviants) a normal meal pairing in the U.K.?

Fries not a traditional side here with steak per say, but they don’t sound half bad either.

Granted Gordon seems to be making some money of people will pay close to 30 bucks for the above combo, in London.View attachment 505749
This is what's worked for me tonight....
Everything but the peas home bred, (and the vino of course, that's a Californian Zinfandel by chance....it's not odd)
20170802_194741.jpg
 

endure

GCM
Same with Thai food.

Thais who open restaurants in the west don’t believe any ‘farang’ can actually eat their food. What they normally serve is what Thai mothers would give to colicky babies who are allergic to chilli.


My Thai mate eats birdshit chillies like westerners eat peanuts
 
What is the difference between your version and the natives?

Meat principally. We have it in nearly all the dishes, where it would be much more sparse if present at all in the subcontinent AIUI. However our versions have also diverged from the originals I think.
 

Oops

War Hero
I'm no wine expert, but I've worked out I'd rather sip a deep,velvety, rich, small glass from a £15 bottle than gulp a watery acidic plonk from a fiver supermarket deal.
It lasts far more than 3 times longer too.
The fact it's called Gnarly Head just adds to the ambience!

Re.
The Grill..
Please understand I'm nearer to your Appalachian Hillbilly demographic than owt else.
Oil's what I put in ma chainsaw.
 
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