America - its all a bit odd...

endure

GCM
Sock suspenders? That's weird, the union flag shorts and string vest combo is positively normal in comparison.

Drinking beer through a hosepipe out of a pint glass balanced on your forehead while juggling is a skill to be admired.

Who are you to criticise my dress sense?
 

endure

GCM
Does anyone actually use sock suspenders? They look like gateway clothing to becoming a transvestite.

My uncle used to wear them when he went ballroom dancing to stop his socks falling down.
 
From wiki

Historical Scottish Covenanter usage
In Scotland in the 1640s, the Covenanters rejected rule by bishops, often signing manifestos using their own blood. Some wore red cloth around their neck to signify their position, and were called rednecks by the Scottish ruling class to denote that they were the rebels in what came to be known as The Bishop's War that preceded the rise of Cromwell.[28][29] Eventually, the term began to mean simply "Presbyterian", especially in communities along the Scottish border. Because of the large number of Scottish immigrants in the pre-revolutionary American South, some historians have suggested that this may be the origin of the term in the United States.[30]

Dictionaries document the earliest American citation of the term's use for Presbyterians in 1830, as "a name bestowed upon the Presbyterians of Fayetteville [North Carolina]".[11][29]
The origin of the term "redneck" in the context of the US is actually much simpler than that. A deeply sun tanned neck was considered to be the signature of a farmer who spent all day working in his fields under under the blazing sun. Farmers were disparaged by many urbanites as being ignorant and prejudiced, so the term "redneck" became a synonym for "ignorant and prejudiced".

There were other similar disparaging terms such as "hayseed", which meant an uneducated and naive person from a rural area, but they are less common now.

The term "redneck" has survived as a disparaging term for any white person perceived as ignorant and prejudiced, regardless of whether they are farmers or not. There is a general tendency for the term to apply to such persons from rural, small town, or remote areas, but a redneck's social origins matter less than the attitudes which they hold when it comes to being called such.

The term is known in Canada, but rarely used here due to different social and historical conditions in agriculture.

Meanwhile farmers themselves have to a large extent moved up the social scale with the increasing size, sophistication, and capital intensity of agricultural operations, with the larger ones being considered to be a sort of middle class.

Americans don't really have a upper class in the sense that people from the UK would understand. They have people who consider themselves to be "upper class", but what nearly all of them actually are, are just chavs with money (celebrities, etc.) or obscenely wealthy businessmen who think that money automatically elevates class status.


As a bit of a tangent, in the early 20th century the social class in Canada who were one of the main driving forces behind socialist political movements and policies were prairie farmers. That has changed with the changing scale of farm operations, but I would be curious to know if the same was true in the US.
 
Sock suspenders? That's weird, the union flag shorts and string vest combo is positively normal in comparison.

Drinking beer through a hosepipe out of a pint glass balanced on your forehead while juggling is a skill to be admired.
The sock suspenders, along with the rest of his garb are intended to make him look clownish. The fact that he is using them in that fashion does in itself tell us that the way he is dressed is considered to be not normal, but to make him stand out as unusual.
 
Very true, no Highland Regiment’s mess ever had members pass their drink over a finger bowl doing a loyal toast, never happened, nope never, pure myth that is....
The point of the tradition was that finger bowls were removed for that reason, over 250 years ago (likely between the '15 and the '45 rebellions; after 1746, the Jacobites gave in and accepted defeat). Anyone doing it since, was an attention-seeker or a poseur...

I've sat in a fair number of formal dinners, and I haven't ever seen a finger bowl - mainly because we use knives and forks these days...
 
Very true, no Highland Regiment’s mess ever had members pass their drink over a finger bowl doing a loyal toast, never happened, nope never, pure myth that is....
I once saw an O/Cdt from NI do it at a formal dinner at RMAS. I had no idea what it meant at the time.
 
The origin of the term "redneck" in the context of the US is actually much simpler than that. A deeply sun tanned neck was considered to be the signature of a farmer who spent all day working in his fields under under the blazing sun. Farmers were disparaged by many urbanites as being ignorant and prejudiced, so the term "redneck" became a synonym for "ignorant and prejudiced".

There were other similar disparaging terms such as "hayseed", which meant an uneducated and naive person from a rural area, but they are less common now.

The term "redneck" has survived as a disparaging term for any white person perceived as ignorant and prejudiced, regardless of whether they are farmers or not. There is a general tendency for the term to apply to such persons from rural, small town, or remote areas, but a redneck's social origins matter less than the attitudes which they hold when it comes to being called such.

The term is known in Canada, but rarely used here due to different social and historical conditions in agriculture.

Meanwhile farmers themselves have to a large extent moved up the social scale with the increasing size, sophistication, and capital intensity of agricultural operations, with the larger ones being considered to be a sort of middle class.

Americans don't really have a upper class in the sense that people from the UK would understand. They have people who consider themselves to be "upper class", but what nearly all of them actually are, are just chavs with money (celebrities, etc.) or obscenely wealthy businessmen who think that money automatically elevates class status.


As a bit of a tangent, in the early 20th century the social class in Canada who were one of the main driving forces behind socialist political movements and policies were prairie farmers. That has changed with the changing scale of farm operations, but I would be curious to know if the same was true in the US.
The Cattle Barons of old reigned supreme, but I would not call them champions for socialism, nor farmers.

The ones who do, are the academic types.
 
No
I can shoot a lot straighter with a rifle than a 3-wood :)
I suspect it had to do with this.

View attachment 486771

'The song is catchy - a classic country and western. A gentle southern twang croons out a chorus. Like many TikTok clips, the user has added music and effects to their video. This is not a normal TikTok vid though.

'First of all, the username clearly contains a homophobic reference. Second, the man is holding a massive assault rifle. "Roll Call: who is a boog boi in Colorado. See who are friends are," is the message. Welcome to TikTok, a place designed for fun and dancing that has a dark underbelly. The video is referring to the Boogaloo Bois, perhaps the most troubling movement to have emerged in the US recently.

'It's hard to describe the group succinctly. Broadly it is an extremist, libertarian militia that is deeply distrustful of government and prepared for a civil war. They are almost always heavily armed.'


So nothing illegal then? ‘Libertarians, distrustful of an over bearing government and exercising their right to bear arms’. Ohhh scary.
You do know most are veterans and many are L.E? Did I wander into a librarians forum?
 
I've sat in a fair number of formal dinners, and I haven't ever seen a finger bowl - mainly because we use knives and forks these days...
Oooohhhh check out Mr La-de-da.
The posh ******.
 
Not quite. Scotland stayed independent until the Scottish King had the best claim to the English throne - and the House of Stewart inherited both kingdoms. The political Act of Union came a hundred years later; no defeat in battle required. As for the "Stewarts get replaced by Hanoverians" thing, there were more Scots on the winning side in 1745, than on the losing side (pretty much all of the Scottish Regiments were on the winning side at Culloden, including mine). Think of it as "Rangers v. Celtic" rather than "Scotland v. England". After the '45, the leaders had their lands and titles confiscated, were occasionally executed, and the PW+Cas handling saw some rather rough justice. Then followed the Highland Clearances, and a lot of people deciding that the sensible thing was to head off to the New World (and marry time-travelling nurses)...

You don't see any Scottish Regiment still toasting the King over the water, or bumper stickers that celebrate the Jacobite rebellion. We don't have rednecks carrying the White Cockade...

Note that after the Traitorous Insurrection of the Slaveowners against His Majesty King George in 1776, and the resulting score-settling (it's where "Lynch Law" comes from) a lot of the Loyalists decided to leave the country, and headed off into Canada - including a lot of my mother's ancestors. The treatment of the traitorous Confederacy was a lot more benign than precedent would demand - perhaps the USA might not have so many problems today, if it had been a bit more "traditional" in its treatment of traitors.
Quite
So the scots surrendered to the English


by the by England still had large numbers of slave owners on its island in 1776 who were loyal


 
What was going through her ribcage was a round fired by an Nazi.
What was going through her mind is
"Why should any freedom loving patriotic American tolerate the flag of a defunct, foreign, genocidal dictatorship that we lost tens of thousands of our loyal citizens putting down, to fly over our soil?"
Because it’s ‘free speech’ - not speech that only the mainstream like and hopefully no one gets offended and changes the goal post.
 
The point of the tradition was that finger bowls were removed for that reason, over 250 years ago (likely between the '15 and the '45 rebellions; after 1746, the Jacobites gave in and accepted defeat). Anyone doing it since, was an attention-seeker or a poseur...

I've sat in a fair number of formal dinners, and I haven't ever seen a finger bowl - mainly because we use knives and forks these days...
Depends on the Regiment and it’s not limited to just finger bowls, glass of water was in vogue at one point.
 

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