America - its all a bit odd...

If this was the case, why didn't the police arrest him, rather than just push him away (resulting in his falling over)?
because as the video shows, this is 100% ass covering BS.
there's no riot, no crowd, just a bunch of tooled up JBTs and NG laying waste to the street and attacking anyone they come across like an Einsatzgruppen clearing a ghetto.
 
your veterans murder Hospital patients?
it sounds like the hospital scene in Schindler's list.
You must be so proud to like in such a sick violent failed state.
This is basically all heat and no light.
Its nothing like the hospital scene in Schindlers unless you can tell us otherwise.
Can you tell us about all the incidents in question in detail that supports any of your post above?
 
One of the unique characteristics of the VA Police is that since the primary threat to the facility generally comes from veterans, often with mental issues, they have greater levels of training with regards to de-escalating or otherwise dealing with such threats than the typical beat cop, but they de-emphasise things like training on traffic laws.
 
One of the unique characteristics of the VA Police is that since the primary threat to the facility generally comes from veterans, often with mental issues, they have greater levels of training with regards to de-escalating or otherwise dealing with such threats than the typical beat cop, but they de-emphasise things like training on traffic laws.
there's the issue RIGHT there, and the correct answer is not more guns and tooled up hospital cops.
 
there's the issue RIGHT there, and the correct answer is not more guns and tooled up hospital cops.
That's often why they are in the VA in the first place. If you are suffering from any service-related mental issues, you go to the VA for treatment. It's not that the issues are being ignored.
 
That's often why they are in the VA in the first place. If you are suffering from any service-related mental issues, you go to the VA for treatment. It's not that the issues are being ignored.
Earlier in the thread someone posted a link to how the VA Police got started. They were formed to keep order in the homes for disabled soldiers and sailors in the mid to late 19th century. The residents of the homes would either smuggle alcohol in or go out and get pissed up and then come back and engage in various sorts of disorderly conduct. So, it wasn't a lot different from what soldiers and sailors do at any other location, and so they needed guards to keep order.
 
Earlier in the thread someone posted a link to how the VA Police got started. They were formed to keep order in the homes for disabled soldiers and sailors in the mid to late 19th century. The residents of the homes would either smuggle alcohol in or go out and get pissed up and then come back and engage in various sorts of disorderly conduct. So, it wasn't a lot different from what soldiers and sailors do at any other location, and so they needed guards to keep order.
I was referring to the people who were the threat in the modern context, not the police. The VA police being fully armed law enforcement body is only a development of the last few decades. Veterans with mental ailments go to the VA hospital for treatment. If a person with a mental ailment is going to cause trouble, a place where they often go and have a higher than normal concentration is not an unreasonable place to expect trouble. Thus a local security force, with a particular emphasis in training on responding to issues of unstable people (they don't have to be armed to be unstable and require a response), is not an unreasonable asset to have.
 
What on earth the **** does this mob police.

Department of Veterans Affairs Police

I receive a large number of benefits from my countries VA system and it interests me just what the function of a VA Police Force is?
To beat the living sh1t out of rowdy nigra veterans?
 
I was referring to the people who were the threat in the modern context, not the police. The VA police being fully armed law enforcement body is only a development of the last few decades. Veterans with mental ailments go to the VA hospital for treatment. If a person with a mental ailment is going to cause trouble, a place where they often go and have a higher than normal concentration is not an unreasonable place to expect trouble. Thus a local security force, with a particular emphasis in training on responding to issues of unstable people (they don't have to be armed to be unstable and require a response), is not an unreasonable asset to have.
What percentage of the VA police are veterans themselves? Always easier to talk to someone who has walked the same path.
 
I was referring to the people who were the threat in the modern context, not the police. The VA police being fully armed law enforcement body is only a development of the last few decades. Veterans with mental ailments go to the VA hospital for treatment. If a person with a mental ailment is going to cause trouble, a place where they often go and have a higher than normal concentration is not an unreasonable place to expect trouble. Thus a local security force, with a particular emphasis in training on responding to issues of unstable people (they don't have to be armed to be unstable and require a response), is not an unreasonable asset to have.
Yes, that's the current context. The original question was why they existed. I was showing why they came into existence in the first place, which was to address a specific problem. Between then and now occurred a process of evolution that followed changes in society. To abolish the VA Police then or now would require finding another way of addressing the same problems, and evidently nobody has thought it worth doing.
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
This is close to what I am trying to put over - almost an arms race.
 
I was referring to the people who were the threat in the modern context, not the police. The VA police being fully armed law enforcement body is only a development of the last few decades. Veterans with mental ailments go to the VA hospital for treatment. If a person with a mental ailment is going to cause trouble, a place where they often go and have a higher than normal concentration is not an unreasonable place to expect trouble. Thus a local security force, with a particular emphasis in training on responding to issues of unstable people (they don't have to be armed to be unstable and require a response), is not an unreasonable asset to have.
my local hospital has a DMHU, but manages just fine to treat troubled veterans without the need for cops with guns.
The problem is americas Unregulated domestic arms race.
 
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Blacks are destroying America by crime and homicide, and now rioting, police murder and looting based on a conspiracy theory. 95% of black people are killed by other black people in the US, they are 14% of the population but commit 52% of homicides. Police shootings of black versus white suspects is no different if you factor in that blacks commit significantly more violent crime.
 
An interesting perspective, whether accurate or not.

'The most recent budget proposal for the city of Los Angeles sparked a flood of social media outrage. Mayor Eric Garcetti wanted to increase the amount of money allocated to the police, raising it to more than $1.85 billion (€1.64 billion), out of a total budget of $5.46 billion — the highest amount allocated to any department. As a comparison, the Housing and Community Investment department would receive less than $82 million if the budget was approved.

'Garcetti has since promised to shift some of the funds to community initiatives but the amount allotted to law enforcement is still sizable. And Los Angeles is no exception — big budgets for police departments are common in US cities.

'According to Stuart Schrader, a sociologist at Johns Hopkins University, big police budgets are rooted in lobbying efforts that first peaked in the 1990s: "Not only was the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) trying to shape anti-crime legislation, it was trying to make elected officials accountable to police, rather than the other way around," Schrader wrote in a 2019 essay titled "To Protect and Serve Themselves: Police in US Politics since the 1960s."

'With decreasing crime rates over the years, Schrader argues that police departments could scale back in many areas of the country. Instead, "rather than allow these capacities to evaporate, police protect them," Schrader writes. "Police have become unwilling to let go of their competitively realized gains, placing their self-interested advocacy at an increasing distance from achieving their nominal mission of crime control."


 
An interesting perspective, whether accurate or not.

'The most recent budget proposal for the city of Los Angeles sparked a flood of social media outrage. Mayor Eric Garcetti wanted to increase the amount of money allocated to the police, raising it to more than $1.85 billion (€1.64 billion), out of a total budget of $5.46 billion — the highest amount allocated to any department. As a comparison, the Housing and Community Investment department would receive less than $82 million if the budget was approved.

'Garcetti has since promised to shift some of the funds to community initiatives but the amount allotted to law enforcement is still sizable. And Los Angeles is no exception — big budgets for police departments are common in US cities.

'According to Stuart Schrader, a sociologist at Johns Hopkins University, big police budgets are rooted in lobbying efforts that first peaked in the 1990s: "Not only was the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) trying to shape anti-crime legislation, it was trying to make elected officials accountable to police, rather than the other way around," Schrader wrote in a 2019 essay titled "To Protect and Serve Themselves: Police in US Politics since the 1960s."

'With decreasing crime rates over the years, Schrader argues that police departments could scale back in many areas of the country. Instead, "rather than allow these capacities to evaporate, police protect them," Schrader writes. "Police have become unwilling to let go of their competitively realized gains, placing their self-interested advocacy at an increasing distance from achieving their nominal mission of crime control."


$1.85 Billion!

for one cities cops?

that’s more than most nations defence budget!
 
$1.85 Billion!

for one cities cops?

that’s more than most nations defence budget!
Yup, always gotta be bigger in the US of A.
 
$1.85 Billion!

for one cities cops?

that’s more than most nations defence budget!
The GDP of the greater Los Angeles area is probably greater than half the world's countries.

To put it in context the annual budget of the Metropolitan Police is twice that amount at £3.24 billion.
 
Earlier in the thread someone posted a link to how the VA Police got started. They were formed to keep order in the homes for disabled soldiers and sailors in the mid to late 19th century. The residents of the homes would either smuggle alcohol in or go out and get pissed up and then come back and engage in various sorts of disorderly conduct. So, it wasn't a lot different from what soldiers and sailors do at any other location, and so they needed guards to keep order.
That's true enough. The Zablocki VA Medical Center in Milwaukee, WI (for example) has an old desk sergeant's log that goes back to the very founding of the place in 1867 and it is very interesting. It has numerous entries of old soldiers being AWOL; smuggling in alcohol; disorderly conduct, etc. I saw it in the foyer of Old Main when I was an inpatient and lived on the grounds for 6 months. I couldn't drive, so I walked a good deal and saw some of the sights. I looked natty in my hospital blues. ;-)
 
The GDP of the greater Los Angeles area is probably greater than half the world's countries.

To put it in context the annual budget of the Metropolitan Police is twice that amount at £3.24 billion.
London has 3x the population and is a major international capital city.
 

RiffRaff

Swinger
London has 3x the population and is a major international capital city.
LAPD and LA Sheriff have 38 helicopters between them. Then there are units operated by other city, state and federal agencies in greater LA. The UK's National Police Helicopter Service has 19 to cover the entire country. Britain.

The Met is a very thin blue line and LA, by US big-city standards, has always been under-policed.
 

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