America - its all a bit odd...

OneTenner

War Hero
Book Reviewer
Not anymore; no consumption of alcohol while on ops for US personnel. I took a US 2* to Film City a couple of years ago for a 2-day staff visit. He was not a tee-totaller. The Swiss, who were hosting us, put on a raclette and beer at their 'chalet' but because of the rule, he was on water all night.
I thought that was a low-numbered 'General Order'? could be true, could be some Septics not wanting to drink with the big boys...
In my experience in Kosovo & Afghan, there were several times they got v.drunk, v.quickly, followed ineviatably by v.gobby and had to be constrained, all had to be hidden away from other Septics as they were shit-scared of being caught... Much fun was had with two of them early the next day on the dems. range south of Pristina - coincidentally the same day a Puma violated the no-fly exclusion area just as a load of Russian missile guidance thingumy-bobs were put beyond use.
I didn't know a Puma could change course that quickly
 

endure

GCM

Carbon 6

Old-Salt
Alcohol stores in Ontario Canada were declared to be an essential service and remained open because of concerns like the above. I don't know the reasoning behind the ban in South Africa, but the result as seen in that story was entirely predictable.
Not only open, they now deliver right to your door. We get a delivery from the Wellington Brewery in Guelph every few weeks. It's a shameless promotion, but we have no ties to the brewery, they just have excellent beer and their service is exemplary.
 
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I thought that was a low-numbered 'General Order'? could be true, could be some Septics not wanting to drink with the big boys...
In my experience in Kosovo & Afghan, there were several times they got v.drunk, v.quickly, followed ineviatably by v.gobby and had to be constrained, all had to be hidden away from other Septics as they were shit-scared of being caught... Much fun was had with two of them early the next day on the dems. range south of Pristina - coincidentally the same day a Puma violated the no-fly exclusion area just as a load of Russian missile guidance thingumy-bobs were put beyond use.
I didn't know a Puma could change course that quickly
All changed in about 2005-6, coincident with the US took over command of ISAF (Gen Richards' replacement; McNeil?). No bad thing at HQ ISAF, as many used to kick the proverbial out of it on a Friday night.
 
Was drinking with an ex USMC chap. I thought he'd be a ruffty tuffty beer and whiskey boy, but he was quite happy with his Apple Martinis.
Each to their own, I suppose.
Doesn't surprise me at all. :rolleyes::glomp:
 

OneTenner

War Hero
Book Reviewer
All changed in about 2005-6, coincident with the US took over command of ISAF (Gen Richards' replacement; McNeil?). No bad thing at HQ ISAF, as many used to kick the proverbial out of it on a Friday night.
It didn't quite all change..... there was a rather large fridge sent down to the UKCOMCEN from Souter... I've no clue if they managed to get it up the spiral staircase!
Otherwise, yer, Saturday mornings at HQ ISAF were always 'muted'
 
And as if people in Michigan don't have enough problems to deal with when it comes to being one of the main centres of COVID-19 infection, they've had a series of dams breaking, causing extensive flooding.
Thousands forced from homes as river dams break in central Michigan
Michigan floodwaters caused by heavy rains, breach of dams start to recede







At least one of the dams was rated as unsafe and unable to withstand a major flood, and US regulators had revoked the company's hydroelectric license in 2018 when the owner didn't fix the problems with it.
The emergency unfolded as questions emerged about the past safety record of one of the two breached dams. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in 2018 revoked the hydropower generating license for the Edenville structure, accusing its operators of failing to address various deficiencies. The commission expressed concern it could not withstand a major flood.


The dam operators and the US government regulators had been at loggerheads with the company over the levels of water they maintained in the reservoir. The company cried that they were too poor to fix the problems and that the government should give them money to fix the dam.
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) directed Boyce Hydro LLC, which owns the dams, to establish an independent investigative team to probe the root cause of the breaches. FERC is sending teams to both dams to assist in an investigation. The agency in 2018 revoked the hydropower-generating licence for the Edenville structure, accusing its operators of deficiencies.

Boyce said in media statements that it had been in conflict with federal and local authorities in recent years over how much water the dams should release and the levels of a nearby lake.

The company also said that since temporarily losing its license in 2018, it was unable to deploy funds to make improvements to the dams, and was not given additional resources by FERC and the local community.
It's not clear just what the government was doing between 2018 and now with respect to forcing the company to do something, but in the US these sorts of problems tend to result in long drawn out court cases over many years.
 
I thought that was a low-numbered 'General Order'? could be true, could be some Septics not wanting to drink with the big boys...
In my experience in Kosovo & Afghan, there were several times they got v.drunk, v.quickly, followed ineviatably by v.gobby and had to be constrained, all had to be hidden away from other Septics as they were shit-scared of being caught... Much fun was had with two of them early the next day on the dems. range south of Pristina - coincidentally the same day a Puma violated the no-fly exclusion area just as a load of Russian missile guidance thingumy-bobs were put beyond use.
I didn't know a Puma could change course that quickly
Centcom G.O. #1

No Alcohol (johnny walker in a Listerine bottle look innocuous)
No Porn (they actually check laptops for it)
No Pork (had a Joe threatened with UCMJ action because someone mailed him some cans of spam)

first day in Iraq, Muslim Jundi from ICTF at CJ-SOTF offers me all 3
 
Gregory McMichael, 64, a former police officer, and his son Travis McMichael, 34, were both jailed on charges of murder and aggravated assault in the Feb. 23 shooting of Ahmaud Arbery. Local prosecutors had initially refused to charge the pair.
Update - 'The Georgia man whose mobile phone video of Ahmaud Arbery’s fatal shooting helped reignite the case was charged with murder on Thursday, making him the third person arrested more than two months after the slaying.

'The Georgia Bureau of Investigation said William “Roddie” Bryan Jr, 50, was arrested on charges of felony murder and criminal attempt to commit false imprisonment. No other details were given. The GBI said in a statement that it would hold a news conference on Friday morning.

'Mr Arbery, 25, was killed on February 23 when a white father and son armed themselves and pursued him after spotting him running in their neighbourhood. More than two months passed before authorities arrested Gregory McMichael, 64, and his son, Travis McMichael, 34, on charges of felony murder and aggravated assault. Gregory McMichael told police he suspected Mr Arbery was a burglar and that Mr Arbery attacked his son before being shot.'


 
Centcom G.O. #1

No Alcohol (johnny walker in a Listerine bottle look innocuous)
No Porn (they actually check laptops for it)
No Pork (had a Joe threatened with UCMJ action because someone mailed him some cans of spam)

first day in Iraq, Muslim Jundi from ICTF at CJ-SOTF offers me all 3
I was based alongside "SIGAR" in Bagram for my final tour of Afghanistan- they were a mixture of NCIS, DCIS, FBI etc and were a great bunch. Especially as they were not military, so (according to them) they could bring in booze. No-one ever got sh*t-faced, but we often had a BBQ (they'd fly in awesome steak and lobster as well) and booze.

Porn, however, was the speciality of us Brits.
 
And as if people in Michigan don't have enough problems to deal with when it comes to being one of the main centres of COVID-19 infection, they've had a series of dams breaking, causing extensive flooding.
Thousands forced from homes as river dams break in central Michigan
Michigan floodwaters caused by heavy rains, breach of dams start to recede







At least one of the dams was rated as unsafe and unable to withstand a major flood, and US regulators had revoked the company's hydroelectric license in 2018 when the owner didn't fix the problems with it.




The dam operators and the US government regulators had been at loggerheads with the company over the levels of water they maintained in the reservoir. The company cried that they were too poor to fix the problems and that the government should give them money to fix the dam.


It's not clear just what the government was doing between 2018 and now with respect to forcing the company to do something, but in the US these sorts of problems tend to result in long drawn out court cases over many years.
Is that the over topping structure in the top left of the following picture?
 
Is that the over topping structure in the top left of the following picture?
There were four pictures in my post originally. The first seems to have gone awol, but it was a picture of the burst dam. The second is of one of the dams overtopping. Both were screen grabs of the video which is in the story. The third photo showing the flooded houses is also a screen grab from the video. I don't know the precise locations of any of those three. Multiple news sites are showing the same video.

The fourth photo of the destroyed road is from one of the CBC news stories, and is captioned "The West Saginaw Road was destroyed in the village of Sanford after the area saw widespread flooding and damage from heavy rains." It's not clear if the road was on the top of one of the dams, or whether it was part of the approach to a bridge, or if it ran alongside the river.

There are lots of photos out there, but not many explanations of what they mean.

Here's a map from one of the CBC stories. What seems to have happened was one of the upstream dams failed after heavy rain, with the flood then taking out other dams down stream.



Here's a Detroit News article with a fair bit of history on what happened.

Apparently the Edenville dam was the subject of a three-way legal fight between federal regulators who wanted upgrades to the spillway to handle greater floods, the Boyce Hydro company who wanted to lower reservoir levels so they wouldn't have to spend money on the dam, and state regulators who wanted the reservoir levels kept high to satisfy property owners around the reservoir who had water front property and didn't want to see mud flats next to their houses. The state regulators were using environmental rules as their excuse, but the actual motivation was pressure from property owners.

The state was working on buying the dam from the company, but that hadn't completed before the dam broke.
 
Alcohol stores in Ontario Canada were declared to be an essential service and remained open because of concerns like the above. I don't know the reasoning behind the ban in South Africa, but the result as seen in that story was entirely predictable.
Total control. A Marxist wet dream. They're happy to destroy the economy as well because having a population totally dependent on the state for their every need makes their button mushrooms tingle.

Of course, the Nomenklatura are unaffected by any of the restrictions and get their JW Blue and smokes as required. It helps that the biggest illegal tobacco trafficker in the country (making a killing) is mates with the minister of health and sponsored her run for the presidency after Zuma. She's also Zuma's ex wife.

The demographic most likely to kick off under lock down (and therefor denied booze) is funnily enough pretty much the same demographic the regime relies on for votes.

You couldn't make up this shit.
 
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There were four pictures in my post originally. The first seems to have gone awol, but it was a picture of the burst dam. The second is of one of the dams overtopping. Both were screen grabs of the video which is in the story. The third photo showing the flooded houses is also a screen grab from the video. I don't know the precise locations of any of those three. Multiple news sites are showing the same video.

The fourth photo of the destroyed road is from one of the CBC news stories, and is captioned "The West Saginaw Road was destroyed in the village of Sanford after the area saw widespread flooding and damage from heavy rains." It's not clear if the road was on the top of one of the dams, or whether it was part of the approach to a bridge, or if it ran alongside the river.

There are lots of photos out there, but not many explanations of what they mean.

Here's a map from one of the CBC stories. What seems to have happened was one of the upstream dams failed after heavy rain, with the flood then taking out other dams down stream.



Here's a Detroit News article with a fair bit of history on what happened.

Apparently the Edenville dam was the subject of a three-way legal fight between federal regulators who wanted upgrades to the spillway to handle greater floods, the Boyce Hydro company who wanted to lower reservoir levels so they wouldn't have to spend money on the dam, and state regulators who wanted the reservoir levels kept high to satisfy property owners around the reservoir who had water front property and didn't want to see mud flats next to their houses. The state regulators were using environmental rules as their excuse, but the actual motivation was pressure from property owners.

The state was working on buying the dam from the company, but that hadn't completed before the dam broke.
I think this is the row of shops in pic 3.


I suspect the section of road in Pic 4 is to the west near where it crosses the river.
West Centre Street runs north to what I think is the dam.
The dam seems to have excavators installing reinforcement.
 

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