America - its all a bit odd...

Besides the USS Constitution was the ship to fear during the time, if you were a limey anchor clanker.
Yes I'm sure all the 100 gun ships in the RN were bricking themselves at meeting a 50 gun frigate.
 
Thank you for that! Very informational tried to watch as much as I could.

So how many ships of the line could the RN muster in 1812?

No problem.

TBH, I don't know but, and others can probably correct me (as well as answer your query), the RN as well as the army were fully engaged in the Napoleonic wars, as well as having an empire to look after, so I would guess the RN was stretched thinly and finding spare ships for the War of 1812 was an unwelcome distraction.

I've only recently come across Drachinifel on YouTube and find it very informative myself.
 
Re: The USS Consitution and its asserted minimal effect on the RN:

" Her ability to defeat enemy men-of-war without sustaining much damage herself gained Constitution the famed nickname she still holds today, "Old Ironsides." The success of the Constitution forced the Royal Navy to abandon the practice of one-on-one encounters between their frigates and the larger U.S. frigates for fear of losing more men-of-war."

 
No problem.

TBH, I don't know but, and others can probably correct me (as well as answer your query), the RN as well as the army were fully engaged in the Napoleonic wars, as well as having an empire to look after, so I would guess the RN was stretched thinly and finding spare ships for the War of 1812 was an unwelcome distraction.

I've only recently come across Drachinifel on YouTube and find it very informative myself.
I imagine the RN was stretched thin, and it does seem the war of 1812 was a rather dangerous gamble for the Empire at the time.
 
Yeah but some Irish were killed twice by The British Army! I read it on this very site so it must be true.
Maybe they were aiming at one particular Irishman and missed? :?
 
Cough. Technically a British win but in actuality a Canadian one.
So it was Dudley Do Right and the Mounties who occupied Detroit during the war of 1812 and left my brother, Tecumseh, hanging when he tried to form our woodland Indian empire to keep the Americans out? Thanks, I'll make a note of that. (Makes tick mark with well licked pencil in notebook)

Dudey Do-Right.PNG
 
Maybe they were aiming at one particular Irishman and missed? :?
Nah, I reckon they killed them again just to make sure they killed them right the first time.
 
But how many were dispatched to operate in the backwater AO??

The USS Constitution did rather well for herself.
Look at the dates Napoleon surrendered and the US stated to ask for a peace treaty. You started a war while we were busy playing with the big boys and when you realised that that war was ending you packed in sharpish before the Peninsular army and the main fleet turned up on the US coast. The USS Constitution did what she was asked in phase 1 and her and her sisters inability to do anything against the main RN in what would have been phase 2 was I'm sure part of the calculation behind the US peace negotiations.

There were actually seven small ship actions during the war. In virtually every case the larger ship won, which was not regarded as unusual. You lost three of your six major warships; Chesapeake, Essex and President, we lost five of ours. [I'm struggling to get a number for RN frigates and capital ships in the 1810's but I'm guessing in excess of 100].

Another aspect of the war that is usually ignored is the effect of the RN blockade on the Us economy. The following is cut from A British View of the Naval War of 1812
"In fact, the blockade greatly harmed the U.S. economy, with exports dropping from $45 million in 1811 to $7 million in 1814". Hardly a successful operation. Wikipedia makes it even worse but uses a start date of 1807 a little before the actual war.
 
Thank you for that! Very informational tried to watch as much as I could.

So how many ships of the line could the RN muster in 1812?
I'm not sure about 1812 specifically, but the following source says that at the time of the Battle of Trafalgar the British had more than 100 ships of the line. Ships of the line were the ships large enough to fight in the main line of battle. They were divided into categories according to a "rating" system, based on the number of guns. So there were 1st rate, 2nd rate, 3rd rate, etc. The larger ones had more firepower in the line of battle, but the smaller ones were often faster and more manoeuvrable, so the different rates had their pros and cons depending upon the context in question.

This site puts the RN total strength in 1792 (the start of the French Revolutionary Wars) at 661, with more than 100,000 crew.

However, the RN had world wide responsibilities ranging from the North Sea to the Middle East, South America, Africa, and India as they fought the French and their allies around the world.

The French went on a massive building program to try to match the RN in terms of numbers, but they lacked the experience and so were still outmatched by the RN overall.

Below "ships of the line" were frigates and other smaller ships. A "frigate" just meant a ship where all the guns were on the same deck. There could be large ones and small ones. Several countries converted some of their ships of the line to "razeed" frigates, which meant they cut off the upper decks and reduced them to a single gun deck. This was typically done with older or smaller ships of the line.
 
Re: The USS Consitution and its asserted minimal effect on the RN:

" Her ability to defeat enemy men-of-war without sustaining much damage herself gained Constitution the famed nickname she still holds today, "Old Ironsides." The success of the Constitution forced the Royal Navy to abandon the practice of one-on-one encounters between their frigates and the larger U.S. frigates for fear of losing more men-of-war."

HMS Shannon was smaller than USS Chesapeake and yet we still have bits of the latter holding up a mill in Hampshire.
USS President was also larger than HMS Endymion who took her surrender.
 
HMS Shannon was smaller than USS Chesapeake and yet we still have bits of the latter holding up a mill in Hampshire.
USS President was also larger than HMS Endymion who took her surrender.
My dear fellow in your apparent rush to disagree with my post, you may have missed it I was referring only to the USS Constitution. Good day.
 
I imagine the RN was stretched thin, and it does seem the war of 1812 was a rather dangerous gamble for the Empire at the time.
From "Wellington's Military Machine' by Haythornthwaite:
'... when the War of 1812 began, for example, only one British ship-of-the-line and six frigates were on the eastern American seaboard... . ...over 100 vessels were diverted from the war with France to blockade the American ports (in the event with great success, as America's trade was wrecked and the country brought to the verge of bankruptcy)... .'
 
Below "ships of the line" were frigates and other smaller ships. A "frigate" just meant a ship where all the guns were on the same deck. There could be large ones and small ones. Several countries converted some of their ships of the line to "razeed" frigates, which meant they cut off the upper decks and reduced them to a single gun deck. This was typically done with older or smaller ships of the line.
I am not sure if that is true. USS Constitution has always been listed as a frigate but has guns on both the the gun deck and the spar deck.
A great ship to visit if any of you are in Boston. My then wife was attached to Constitution '79-'81 as a public affairs officer, reporting to the CO of Constitution but not ships company. I spent some time on board back then when I would pick her up from work. I would go to the quarterdeck and the watch would call her and say I was there. On a few occasions she would say she needed 20-30 minutes to finish something and I would go down to the orlop deck which is not open to the public and have a coffee. Above that is all historical but the orlop deck is home to the 12 man duty section that sleeps on board and has navy bunks, coffee machine, TV, microwave etc.
I recall my wife was promoted to Lieutenant on board Constitution. It was her first day with two stripes and her first day in maternity uniform. She left active duty about a month before our son was born, stayed USNR for her 20 years.
 
I am not sure if that is true. USS Constitution has always been listed as a frigate but has guns on both the the gun deck and the spar deck.
A great ship to visit if any of you are in Boston. My then wife was attached to Constitution '79-'81 as a public affairs officer, reporting to the CO of Constitution but not ships company. I spent some time on board back then when I would pick her up from work. I would go to the quarterdeck and the watch would call her and say I was there. On a few occasions she would say she needed 20-30 minutes to finish something and I would go down to the orlop deck which is not open to the public and have a coffee. Above that is all historical but the orlop deck is home to the 12 man duty section that sleeps on board and has navy bunks, coffee machine, TV, microwave etc.
I recall my wife was promoted to Lieutenant on board Constitution. It was her first day with two stripes and her first day in maternity uniform. She left active duty about a month before our son was born, stayed USNR for her 20 years.
Ice Cream machine?
 
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