America - its all a bit odd...

Any views on Chatham in cape cod? Off there for a week at the end of this month.

Is it sit on the sand, paddle a bit and look at chinsey shops, or is there anything to do there?
 
Any views on Chatham in cape cod? Off there for a week at the end of this month.

Is it sit on the sand, paddle a bit and look at chinsey shops, or is there anything to do there?
@DavidBOC is your man for New England.
 
Any views on Chatham in cape cod? Off there for a week at the end of this month.

Is it sit on the sand, paddle a bit and look at chinsey shops, or is there anything to do there?
@Roadster280 mentions me, I respond.
You chose your destination well! I live in Scituate, MA which is halfway between Boston and the start of Cape Cod but if I was thinking of moving to the Cape I would pick Chatham. To my taste, the nicest town of Cape Cod. Nice beach just below the Chatham lighthouse, park opposite the lighthouse. Water in Chatham is a bit cooler than in Cape Cod bay.
Monomoy Island is a spit off the end of the cape. (If you imagine Cape Cod as a bent arm Chatham is at the elbow and Monomoy is a peninsula or island hanging down from the elbow.) Currents do crazy things around Chatham and some years you can walk there at low tide, other years you take a boat. Not sure if it is a peninsula or Island this year. I have a friend who owns a home near Chatham light and owns a 27 foot Boston Whaler. I recall one time leaving Stage Harbor and taking a crazy trip following a convoluted channel to the ocean. A month later we visited again and took an equally convoluted trip on an entirely different route.
Monomoy is worth a visit if you can get there, controlled by the US Fish and Wildlife service it is home to many species of birds, some endangered. If you are on Monomoy and an area is roped off with signs saying "Do not enter Piping Plovers nesting" DO NOT cross the rope, the fines are eye-watering.
The Chatham Bars Inn in Chatham is the poshest place in Chatham. Food is great if you are prepared to take out a second mortgage on your home. They do have a dress code for the dining room (no jeans, shirts must have collars, jackets preferred). If tempted, stop at the bar for a cocktail and then eat elsewhere. There is no shortage of nice restaurants on the cape. The best lobster I have ever had was at a place where you picked up your lobster at the counter and carried it to a picnic table.

Nauset Beach is in Orleans, just north of Chatham. Big beautiful beach. You have to pay to park but the beach is nice, there are toilets and changing rooms with showers and a snack bar. (Snack bar was great when I stopped there a few years ago. Order onion rings).

The village in Chatham is very nice, lots of interesting shops, back when I was married my wife loved it there. Nice restaurants there too.
Also in Chatham is Marconi Station where Guglielmo Marconi, the Anglo Irish inventor established a post to handle traffic by Morse. It stayed in business (other than WW II) until the 1990s. During WW II it was run by the Navy and spent a lot of time monitoring U Boat traffic. A museum now it is worth a visit and tickets are half price with military ID. (definitely for US, if you have British military ID ask)

Seals!! I nearly forgot the seals. The ocean around Chatham seems full of seals. The sun themselves on the beaches and rocks. Lots are on Monomoy (cf. supra). There is a guy with a boat who takes people out for seal tours. Nice to see them. Once on a hot day I was standing chest deep in the water at the end of my street. The woman I was taking to suddenly said "look at that poor dog, he's low in the water'. I looked and saw the muzzle of a lab, then he stuck his head out. No ears! A seal coming to check out humans.

One other thing. If you want to wear a hat I would not suggest wearing a NY Yankees hat. Here in New England we recognize that the Yankees are aligned with the forces of darkness and evil. It indicates probable satanic influences.
 
Only in America!

'With classic understatement, Guthrie Police Sgt. Anthony Gibbs said, "There's quite a few unanswered questions. So now he's got a rattlesnake, a stolen vehicle, firearm, and somebody under arrest," he said.'

Couple arrested for driving stolen car filled with uranium, a rattlesnake and whiskey: "There's quite a few unanswered questions"
'Murica- Fuck, yeah!

TBQH it makes perfect sense to me. Something I'd probably have done when younger. I'm just surprised they're not naked and have a coffin full of beer on the roof rack.
 
'Murica- Fuck, yeah!

TBQH it makes perfect sense to me. Something I'd probably have done when younger. I'm just surprised they're not naked and have a coffin full of beer on the roof rack.
And you reason for having the uranium would have been... ?
 
I need to have a few beers before that kind of inspiration strikes me.

It would be cool to have something that glows in the dark though.

...Or just glow in the dark myself.
 
@Roadster280 mentions me, I respond.
You chose your destination well! I live in Scituate, MA which is halfway between Boston and the start of Cape Cod but if I was thinking of moving to the Cape I would pick Chatham. To my taste, the nicest town of Cape Cod. Nice beach just below the Chatham lighthouse, park opposite the lighthouse. Water in Chatham is a bit cooler than in Cape Cod bay.
Monomoy Island is a spit off the end of the cape. (If you imagine Cape Cod as a bent arm Chatham is at the elbow and Monomoy is a peninsula or island hanging down from the elbow.) Currents do crazy things around Chatham and some years you can walk there at low tide, other years you take a boat. Not sure if it is a peninsula or Island this year. I have a friend who owns a home near Chatham light and owns a 27 foot Boston Whaler. I recall one time leaving Stage Harbor and taking a crazy trip following a convoluted channel to the ocean. A month later we visited again and took an equally convoluted trip on an entirely different route.
Monomoy is worth a visit if you can get there, controlled by the US Fish and Wildlife service it is home to many species of birds, some endangered. If you are on Monomoy and an area is roped off with signs saying "Do not enter Piping Plovers nesting" DO NOT cross the rope, the fines are eye-watering.
The Chatham Bars Inn in Chatham is the poshest place in Chatham. Food is great if you are prepared to take out a second mortgage on your home. They do have a dress code for the dining room (no jeans, shirts must have collars, jackets preferred). If tempted, stop at the bar for a cocktail and then eat elsewhere. There is no shortage of nice restaurants on the cape. The best lobster I have ever had was at a place where you picked up your lobster at the counter and carried it to a picnic table.

Nauset Beach is in Orleans, just north of Chatham. Big beautiful beach. You have to pay to park but the beach is nice, there are toilets and changing rooms with showers and a snack bar. (Snack bar was great when I stopped there a few years ago. Order onion rings).

The village in Chatham is very nice, lots of interesting shops, back when I was married my wife loved it there. Nice restaurants there too.
Also in Chatham is Marconi Station where Guglielmo Marconi, the Anglo Irish inventor established a post to handle traffic by Morse. It stayed in business (other than WW II) until the 1990s. During WW II it was run by the Navy and spent a lot of time monitoring U Boat traffic. A museum now it is worth a visit and tickets are half price with military ID. (definitely for US, if you have British military ID ask)

Seals!! I nearly forgot the seals. The ocean around Chatham seems full of seals. The sun themselves on the beaches and rocks. Lots are on Monomoy (cf. supra). There is a guy with a boat who takes people out for seal tours. Nice to see them. Once on a hot day I was standing chest deep in the water at the end of my street. The woman I was taking to suddenly said "look at that poor dog, he's low in the water'. I looked and saw the muzzle of a lab, then he stuck his head out. No ears! A seal coming to check out humans.

One other thing. If you want to wear a hat I would not suggest wearing a NY Yankees hat. Here in New England we recognize that the Yankees are aligned with the forces of darkness and evil. It indicates probable satanic influences.
Thanks for that. I’ll leave the Yankees hat at home. I’ve got my British Legion card........
 
Thanks for that. I’ll leave the Yankees hat at home. I’ve got my British Legion card........
@Simmerit - A PM will be heading to you soon. No sense boring others with details only good for Cape Cod visitors.
 
I have wondered how things would go if I tried spending the bills and coins I still have, it would be fun just to see the looks on the faces of the cashiers.
I doubt they’d blink. I was over there last week and found coins in my change minted in the 1960s as well as prehistoric looking bills.
 
With FBs announcentment of their new crypto currency, an amusing thread on how despite being one of the most advanced countries in the world, in some areas (Banking) they are years behind the rest of us.

I guess he never heard of SpeedPass, Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, or any number of other systems to facilitate the use with all the major card companies (mostly US) that promulgated the system in the 90s.

When was the first major implementation of "touchless" in the UK? Barclay's a little over 10 years ago?

I recently retired my 20 year old SpeedPass (gas card) by adding the "new" Speedpass app to my S9.
 
I don't underestimate it at all Jonesy. That was exactly my point. You missed it.

So lets look at Oregon. Assume 80% of Oregonians voted Dem and the CC stuff was part of their manifesto. (ignore the actual numbers - focus on the concept).

What do the 20% do if they don't like something? Lock'n'load and head for the hills? Seems legit for the Reps, who are denying their voters proper representation and who would be irrelevant if the dems had one more seat (might be 2 but I cant be arrsed looking).

What if 2% of the population don't like it and take to the hills tooled up to the max.

1% or less? WTF happens.

Where is the line between acceptance of democracy and rejecting it totally and going for "who has the most guns".
80% did not vote Dem. It is basically Portland dominating the rest of the state. Just like Seattle dominating Washington State, Chicago dominating Illinois, NYC dominating New York, and LA MSA dominating California. 51% of the pop of the mega cities gets 80% of the representation due to creative construction of districts, and the tilt only gets worse as disgruntled people of all shades leave for lower taxes and better representation.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I guess he never heard of SpeedPass, Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, or any number of other systems to facilitate the use with all the major card companies (mostly US) that promulgated the system in the 90s.

When was the first major implementation of "touchless" in the UK? Barclay's a little over 10 years ago?

I recently retired my 20 year old SpeedPass (gas card) by adding the "new" Speedpass app to my S9.
SpeedPass was restricted to Mobil & Esso Premises,

Apple Pay was launched in 2014
Samsung Pay in 2015.

Youvare missing the whole argument, which is that in the US there are multiple payment systems created whilst over here we have a simpler system that covers most everything and does not tie you to one App/Device/Retailer

Essentially you are needlessly and inefficiently reinventing the wheel, except your wheels are hexagons, Pentagon's and so on, we have a good old circular one.

BACS has been around since 1968
Chip and Pin since 1986
Contactless Bank Cards since 2007
 
Last edited:
SpeedPass was restricted to Mobil & Esso Premises,

Apple Pay was launched in 2014
Samsung Pay in 2015.

Youvare missing the whole argument, which is that in the US there are multiple payment systems created whilst over here we have a simpler system that covers most everything and does not tie you to one App/Device/Retailer

Essentially you are needlessly and inefficiently reinventing the wheel, except your wheels are hexagons, Pentagon's and so on, we have a good old circular one.

BACS has been around since 1968
Chip and Pin since 1986
Contactless Bank Cards since 2007
Apple pay, Samsung Pay, et al are apps using built in rfid hardware of the phones, which work with Mastercard, Visa, American Express, etc. to facilitate the security and processing of the transaction, they are not through Apple or Samsung, etc. There are three standards for Contactless... many operators. More a convenience for not having to carry around all those contactless cards.

Our ACH was also developed in 1968, but, just like BACS, is the back end between banks, and originally not anything to do with customer facing operations.

EVM (for Europay, Mastercard, and Visa), or chip and pin development goes back to 1993-4. Notice that is 2/3 US Companies... and the three ISO 14443 standards for contactless are called Contactless (Mastercard), Paywave (Visa), and ExpressPay (American Express)... I wonder which developed those?

Merchants that don't use the latest and greatest are always punished with higher fees and more liability when fraud occurs, with every new change to the merchant contracts. Hell, my contactless payments puck is re-chargable, fits in my pocket, and links through my cell phone, or office network, but I still have an old fashioned imprinter if I want to accept cards if the internet ever goes dark (which is probably not, because all the fraud reference material is now on the internet).
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Apple pay, Samsung Pay, et al are apps using built in rfid hardware of the phones, which work with Mastercard, Visa, American Express, etc. to facilitate the security and processing of the transaction, they are not through Apple or Samsung, etc. There are three standards for Contactless... many operators. More a convenience for not having to carry around all those contactless cards.

Our ACH was also developed in 1968, but, just like BACS, is the back end between banks, and originally not anything to do with customer facing operations.

EVM (for Europay, Mastercard, and Visa), or chip and pin development goes back to 1993-4. Notice that is 2/3 US Companies... and the three ISO 14443 standards for contactless are called Contactless (Mastercard), Paywave (Visa), and ExpressPay (American Express)... I wonder which developed those?

Merchants that don't use the latest and greatest are always punished with higher fees and more liability when fraud occurs, with every new change to the merchant contracts. Hell, my contactless payments puck is re-chargable, fits in my pocket, and links through my cell phone, or office network, but I still have an old fashioned imprinter if I want to accept cards if the internet ever goes dark (which is probably not, because all the fraud reference material is now on the internet).
BACS can be used by anyone in the UK with a bank account, I've been receiving payments and paying suppliers and service providers for years using it.
 
Apple pay, Samsung Pay, et al are apps using built in rfid hardware of the phones, which work with Mastercard, Visa, American Express, etc. to facilitate the security and processing of the transaction, they are not through Apple or Samsung, etc. There are three standards for Contactless... many operators. More a convenience for not having to carry around all those contactless cards.

Our ACH was also developed in 1968, but, just like BACS, is the back end between banks, and originally not anything to do with customer facing operations.

EVM (for Europay, Mastercard, and Visa), or chip and pin development goes back to 1993-4. Notice that is 2/3 US Companies... and the three ISO 14443 standards for contactless are called Contactless (Mastercard), Paywave (Visa), and ExpressPay (American Express)... I wonder which developed those?

Merchants that don't use the latest and greatest are always punished with higher fees and more liability when fraud occurs, with every new change to the merchant contracts. Hell, my contactless payments puck is re-chargable, fits in my pocket, and links through my cell phone, or office network, but I still have an old fashioned imprinter if I want to accept cards if the internet ever goes dark (which is probably not, because all the fraud reference material is now on the internet).
These technologies may be available in the US, but when I moved there in 2013, I had to relearn how to write a cheque. Even buying a car was easier by cheque than a bank transfer (which mysteriously took 5 working days).
I was impressed by some of the more inventive solutions, though, like paying in a cheque by sending a photo of it to the bank.
Although I understand they are now more widespread, I never had a contactless card or even a chip and pin card while I was there. I moved back in 2015.
 
These technologies may be available in the US, but when I moved there in 2013, I had to relearn how to write a cheque. Even buying a car was easier by cheque than a bank transfer (which mysteriously took 5 working days).
I was impressed by some of the more inventive solutions, though, like paying in a cheque by sending a photo of it to the bank.
Although I understand they are now more widespread, I never had a contactless card or even a chip and pin card while I was there. I moved back in 2015.
I forgot how to write a cheque! If I had to break one out now, I would be a bit puzzled..the last time I probably have written one was 12 or something years ago..
 

Similar threads


Top