America - its all a bit odd...

I had a mate in the Army that used to get a pocket full of Susan B. Anthony dollar coins every payday. He liked fcuking with the publicans, and shopkeepers because the Susan B. Anthonys are close in size to a quarter.

Susan Anthony Coin.JPG
 
I bet you wore your Class A's and waited in line to get paid in those dark days as well...
Summer weight Tropical Worsted, if you please, Class Bs. Like Will Smith said in "Men In Black", I make this shit look GOOD. !

We all did in those days. Mind you, there is nothing wrong with looking good. (Or says the shouty man with the sash.)

Eddy Me ~1.jpg
 
Not shaving daily or twice a day at times is rather nice.

Wimmin do like the beards these days.

Voluntarily remaining clean shaven is barbaric.
Alas, some of us have beards that start well below the adam's apple and end just under the eye sockets. I'd look like a werewolf. Still I used to piss off my troppy because I had cheek tufts and there was feck all he could do about them; the best he could grow was a wispy Ronald Coleman.
 
For how much a month?!
$268 American dollahs a month and all the monkey skulls I could gnaw. I would have done it for half that, but I had bar girls to support. ;-)
 
Whats primitive about a top loading washer? Front loaders are a Euro idea designed to fit under a counter in the, smaller , Euro kitchens.

Our top loader stands in a separate laundry next to the stupid front loading drier, which sits on a base to raise it off the floor.
Full size front load washing machines aren't really any smaller than full size top loaders. The space advantage only comes with compact size versions that take smaller loads but are designed to stack on top of each other with the washer (the heavy item) on the bottom.

The front loaders are supposed to conserve water and energy, as they just spray a bit of water into the bottom and then tumble the clothes through it while top loaders fill up the tub and then agitate the clothes back and forth while the clothes are suspended in water.

Top loaders tend to get your clothes cleaner and you can get more into a single load than with a similar size front loader. Having used both, I prefer the top loaders as doing a better job at actually getting clothes clean, there's really no substitute for having lots of water to separate the dirt from the clothes. The main disadvantage of the top loaders (aside from greater water use) seems to be that they are more prone to tripping on unbalanced loads.

Top tip - if you have a large top load washer choose your wardrobe colours and fabrics carefully and you can throw all your laundry in together in one load instead of separating it and so spend less time doing laundry and more time doing other things.
 
I have a couple of dollar coins and a couple of $2 dollar bills laying around somewhere, both are still legal tender although no longer in circulation.
When did the US $2 bills fall out of circulation? I don't recall ever seeing one.

In Canada $2 bills were very common and remained in circulation until they were replaced by toonies ($2 coins). We dropped the penny a few years ago, and there is talk of replacing the $5 bill with a coin.
 
When did the US $2 bills fall out of circulation? I don't recall ever seeing one.
August 1966 but reintroduced again in 1976 to mark the US Bicentennial celebration. Going out of circulation is probably the wrong word to use as the were still printing them as late as 2005. It's just that they are very rarely seen these days.

I can't say I've ever been given a $2 bill in my change in all the years I've lived here. The ones I have were given to me by my FiL some years back.
 
Picked up a few $2 bills paying for fuel around African airports. The bloke returning them as change was delighted that I hadn't questioned their veracity and returned them as they were regarded with suspicion by the locals.

In that vein, actually getting change was a bit of an issue if you were just passing through. Paying with large denomination bills meant the fueller would claim he had no change for you, and in your haste to leave his shithole country you'd just write off the forty or sixty dollar difference and fuck off sharpish. A well known scam.

When I started flying out of the airport in question in central Africa, the bugger tried that one with me but I made him sign a receipt, and when I showed up the next day for fuel he was a bit sorry for himself when I deducted the receipt from the fuel bill. Fuel wallah tried to force the issue but a mate in country who had a few contacts offered to involve the local military and he backed down in a hurry. Funny enough, he always seemed to have change after that.
 
When did the US $2 bills fall out of circulation? I don't recall ever seeing one.

In Canada $2 bills were very common and remained in circulation until they were replaced by toonies ($2 coins). We dropped the penny a few years ago, and there is talk of replacing the $5 bill with a coin.
The US $2 note is still in circulation, but is not as commonly seen as the one dollar note. Wikipedia says:

In 1928, when all U.S. currency was changed to its current size, the $2 bill was issued only as a United States Note. The obverse featured a cropped version of Thomas Jefferson's portrait that had been on previous $2 bills. The reverse featured Jefferson's home, Monticello. As with all United States Notes the treasury seal and serial numbers were red. The Series of 1928 $2 bill featured the treasury seal superimposed by the United States Note obligation to the left and a large gray two to the right.[21]

In 1953, the $2 bill along with the $5 United States Note received minor design changes. The treasury seal was made smaller and moved to the right side of the bill; it was superimposed over the gray word two. The United States Note obligation now became superimposed over a gray numeral 2. The reverse remained unchanged.[22]

The final change to $2 United States Notes came in 1963 when the motto in god we trust was added to the reverse over the Monticello.[23] Further, because silver certificates were soon to be no longer redeemable in silver, will pay to the bearer on demand was removed from the obverse. In August 1966, all current denominations of United States Notes ($2, $5 and $100) were officially discontinued, though they all remain legal tender.


More were printed as Federal Reserve Notes beginning in 1976.

On April 13, 1976, the Treasury Department reissued the $2 note as a cost-saving measure.[24] Series 1976 $2 bills were redesigned as a Federal Reserve Note. The note retains the same portrait of Jefferson, and the basic design of the obverse remains unchanged since 1928. The treasury seal and serial numbers are printed in green ink, replacing the red used on the previous United States Note. Since the reintroduction of the note coincided with the United States Bicentennial, it was decided to use a bicentennial-themed design on the reverse. Contrary to wide belief, the bill was not issued specifically to celebrate the bicenntenial. An engraved rendition (not an exact reproduction) of John Trumbull's Declaration of Independencereplaced Monticello on the reverse. First-day issues of the new $2 bills could be taken to a post office and stamped with the date "APR 13 1976". In all, 590,720,000 notes from Series 1976 were printed.

Currently, stamped series 1976 $2 notes typically trade for about twice their face value. If the bills were stamped in a city with an unusual name, the value may be slightly higher. However, no first-day-issued 1976 $2 bills with postage stamps are especially rare or valuable.

Despite their age, crisp, uncirculated series 1976 $2 notes are not uncommon and are not particularly valuable. More than half a billion of these notes were printed and a large number of them were saved and hoarded upon their original issue. A typical, single uncirculated 1976 $2 bill is worth only slightly above $2 face value. An average circulated series 1976 note has no additional value above its $2 face.

In 1996 and 1997, 153,600,000 bills were printed[25] as Series 1995 for the Federal Reserve District of Atlanta. In 2004, 121,600,000 of the Series 2003 bills were printed for the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank. An issue of Series 2003A $2 bills was printed from July to September 2006 for all twelve Federal Reserve Banks. In all, 220,800,000 notes were printed.[26]

In February 2012, the B.E.P. printed 512,000 Series 2009 $2 Star Notes, in anticipation of more regular runs being printed later in 2012. Series 2009 $2 bills were issued to banks during the summer of 2012.[27][28]

In November 2013, the B.E.P. began printing series 2013 $2 notes for the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; these notes entered circulation in early 2014. A total of 44,800,000 notes were ordered for fiscal year 2014, which ran from October 2013 through September 2014.[29]


I have a 2 dollar bill in my wallet for good luck. It is a series 2009 note which I got from an Indian casino. (We like all kinds of waupum. )
 
Maybe this also happens in other parts of the world, but WTF!

'In a bulletin that will make many people do a double-take, the Food and Drug Administration just issued a very serious warning for individuals considering a controversial treatment where one individual’s poop is transplanted into another. Yes, poop transplants are a real thing, and they’ve actually proven to be incredibly beneficial for certain people suffering from a variety of ailments related to their intestines. However, the FDA warning emphasizes caution due to a recent case where two individuals receiving the fecal transplants became seriously ill, with one of the recipients actually dying as a result.'

Poop transplant claims one life, prompts FDA warning
 
Maybe this also happens in other parts of the world, but WTF!

'In a bulletin that will make many people do a double-take, the Food and Drug Administration just issued a very serious warning for individuals considering a controversial treatment where one individual’s poop is transplanted into another. Yes, poop transplants are a real thing, and they’ve actually proven to be incredibly beneficial for certain people suffering from a variety of ailments related to their intestines. However, the FDA warning emphasizes caution due to a recent case where two individuals receiving the fecal transplants became seriously ill, with one of the recipients actually dying as a result.'

Poop transplant claims one life, prompts FDA warning
So far as I am aware, it's used in many countries. It's used in cases where you have undergone some sort of serious treatment which kills all the normal bacterial in your digestive system. If you just let the bacterial grow back randomly, you run the risk of dangerous bacteria happening to get a head start by chance and taking over before the normal benign bacterial can get a foothold. So what they do is to insert some bacteria from a healthy person to give the "right sort" of bacteria a head start. It's also used to treat certain chronic gut diseases which are caused by the "wrong" sort of bacterial having taken over.

Here's a BBC article on poop donors in the UK.
'Super poo donors' wanted

Research in recent years has shown that the sort of bacterial in your gut are important to your health. There is also interesting research which suggests that the sort of bacteria in your gut affects how prone you are to obesity, although it's not clear at this time whether that is a cause or an effect. The controversy at present is mainly about what range of conditions or diseases other than straightforward gut infections can be treated with it, with some claiming it can be beneficial in treating things like autism (most scientists remain to be convinced on things like that).

"Probiotic" foods such as probiotic yoghurt come pre-mixed with bacteria which are supposed to promote a healthy bacterial balance. The problem is that the bacteria they use is generally not the type that would be beneficial to your gut, often being cultured from sources such as women's vaginas instead. Opinions on probiotic foods range from being a harmless way to separate the gullible from their money to possibly having unknown health risks. I avoid them.

As an aside, many scientists recommend avoiding routine use of anti-bacterial cleaners for household cleaning. You want things to be clean, but "normal" bacteria are a normal thing to have, and killing them all can clear the way for the location to be recolonized by dangerous bacteria who might otherwise find it difficult to compete with the more benign sort. Routine use of anti-bacterial household cleaners also inevitably over time leads to your effectively breeding a strain of bacteria which resists anti-bacterial measures and which then take over your house displacing the normal sort. This would leave you up shit creek should you later develop a health problem which weakens your immune system (e.g. cancer treatment) where the use of anti-bacterial cleaners might be of benefit. Things should be clean, but recognise that benign bacteria are normal.
 
The 'Mur'can answer to the Rabbit of Caerbannog ?

'A man kept a caged “attack squirrel” in his apartment and fed it methamphetamine to make it more aggressive, according to police in Alabama.

'Detectives are looking for the squirrel’s 35-year-old captor Mickey Paulk, who is wanted on multiple charges including possession of a controlled substance. Police were informed about the squirrel shortly before executing a search warrant of Mr Paulk’s home in Athens on Monday. The animal is said to have been fed the drug, known as meth or crystal meth, to make it more likely to attack.'

Man gave meth to caged 'attack squirrel' to make it more aggressive

The original, and best.

 

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