America - its all a bit odd...

I’m currently absorbed in Another Fine Mess, British motorist Tim Moore’s account of crossing the continental USA in a Model T Ford via Trump-voting areas ($1.99 on Kindle) and it’s worth it for this passage alone:

‘...Obviously Trump is a jackass, but, you know–we’re Republicans.’ Paul shrugged helplessly: his preference, one he had bolstered with campaign donations, had been the inestimably less appalling Ohio governor, John Kasich. I could only sympathise. This must be how it feels when the football club you’ve supported all your life appoints a manager you find it very difficult to warm to, on the grounds that he’s an absolutely colossal anus. And who then wins the league, but does it by playing with seventeen Russians up front.​
‘So, Tim, you think we’ve had our day as number one?’
The question seemed an obvious follow-on, and the catch in Paul’s voice suggested he already knew my answer. Putting Donald Trump in the White House was hardly the act of a confident, optimistic nation, comfortable in its own skin. I hadn’t been alone in seeing his election as an end-of-era event, a superpower on the wane raging against the dying of its light. When had that light shone brightest?​
Since setting off I’d been routinely struck by the anachronistic trappings of daily life, the fixtures and fittings that dated America’s high-water mark to somewhere around 1962. The weedy 110-volt power supply that struggled to boil my bedroom kettles. The crappy, wobbly two-pin plugs. The cumbersome top-load washers in the motel laundry, like props from a monochrome sitcom. The speed-stick deodorant that I’d bought by default in a West Virginian pharmacy, a real blast from the personal-care past which harvested short and curlies while pasting my pits in mentholated lard.​
However poorly all these accoutrements had aged, half a century back they were the trailblazing future. Domestic appliances and hot showers for all! America was a proving ground for the modern way of first-world living. It proudly invented all these home comforts, then popularised and standardised them, while the rest of the benighted, unwashed, steam-powered world looked on in awe. For more than half a century, they led and we followed. They were number one by a million miles.​
I remember when my American cousin Patricia, Miles’s partner, first visited us in London in 1976, and left her toiletries laid out in the family bathroom. I was agog. A bottle of strawberry hair conditioner held particular fascination. I’d never even heard of hair conditioner–I’m pretty sure it didn’t exist in Britain back then, except perhaps as some harshly medicated slurry that stank like Vicks VapoRub and made your scalp shriek. This stuff was a creamy pale rose and (sorry, Patricia) smelled good enough to drink. It was also graced with a runic robot tattoo–the first barcode I had ever seen. Patricia had bottled the future and brought it over.​
But that was about as far as they got. Europe and the Far East stealthily reeled them in, and because Americans never leave their country–Patricia was the exception that proved this rule–they didn’t notice. When my wife and I first watched Friends back in the mid-1990s, we were amazed to see Chandler dispense high-end Manhattanite sarcasm into a house-phone the size of a wine box, the sort of hulking embarrassment even my parents had long since chucked out. And because Americans are so cocksure and headstrong, even when they belatedly did notice, they took forever to react. The fossil-fuelled, eight-track American Way was the original and best...​
 
The following is a rather interesting story is about how 50 years ago the Americans turned off the American side of Niagara Falls.
www.cbc.ca/archives/50-years-ago-the-u-s-turned-off-their-part-of-niagara-falls-1.5153072?cmp=rss

There are several short videos in the story which will not embed in this forum software, but which are definitely worth watching.

A brief summary however is that there are actually two (or three if you count the very small Bridal Veil) falls at Niagara, divided by Goat Island. The island is in the US, and the border runs along the edge of the water. The Canadian or Horseshoe Falls is thus entirely in Canada, and 90% of the water flows over this falls.

The other falls is known as the American Falls, and the remaining 10% of the flow goes over it.

The American Falls however is falling to bits and the crumbling stone is piling up at the foot. Some feel that this detracts from the appearance of it, so 50 years ago a temporary dam was built between the Goat Island and the mainland of the US, drying up the falls. This allowed geologists to study the rock under the falls to get a better idea of how long the falls may last. The dam was then removed some months later and the water continues to flow today.

The videos show the American Falls as the water was cut off, leaving it dry. It makes for quite an interesting sight.
Everyone knows that the Canadian side of the falls are much better anyways for the views.
 
Another gem from Another Fine Mess, British motorist Tim Moore’s account of crossing the continental USA in a Model T Ford via Trump-voting areas ($1.99 on Kindle):

...Scooping out silver to supplement the breakfast waitress’s tip, I’d been struck by another pig-headed native anachronism. The highest denomination coin in mass circulation was still the quarter, with a face value of less than 20p. My pockets always jangled heavily: I had to harvest quarters, ready to stuff them by the fistful into a forecourt air compressor, or a motel washer or tumble dryer.​
Every few years the US Treasury attempts to relaunch the dollar coin, reminding Americans of the vast savings the nation could make with a switch from dollar bills (the current estimate is $ 4.4 billion over thirty years, the typical life of a coin). And every time it fails. Of the 1.4 billion dollar coins ever minted, over half have been returned, unloved and unwanted, to federal reserve banks. I didn’t encounter a single one of the circulating remainders. Consumers just can’t be doing with them. They want a great sweaty wodge of good old American greenbacks.​
The federal authorities could of course force the issue by removing dollar bills from circulation, as the Canadian authorities did all the way back in 1989 (a year after the Bank of England killed off the pound note). But they won’t, because they’re too scared of the backlash. As I would discover, the most reviled adjective in Middle America is that other F-word: federal.​
The American small-town public is so conservative, so obstinately proud of its parochial old ways, so deeply hostile to federal meddling, that the authorities haven’t even dared to change the size of its coins in over a hundred years. As a result, pennies, nickels and dimes all now cost more to produce than their face value. Minting a one-cent coin sets the Treasury back 1.7 cents. What a remarkable state of affairs.​
The Bank of England introduced plastic banknotes while I was away. If the US Treasury tried to pull that, Donald Trump could probably declare himself emperor and be done with it...​
 
I have a couple of dollar coins and a couple of $2 dollar bills laying around somewhere, both are still legal tender although no longer in circulation.
My dollar coins went in the vending machine at work.

I remember a few years ago a kid was arrested for trying to pay for his school lunch with a forged banknote. It was only when an older detective became involved that he pointed out that the $2 bill was still legal tender. The kids parents were planning to sue the school board and the police, I lost track so I don't know how it went.

Sent from my Lenovo TB2-X30F using Tapatalk
 
My dollar coins went in the vending machine at work.

I remember a few years ago a kid was arrested for trying to pay for his school lunch with a forged banknote. It was only when an older detective became involved that he pointed out that the $2 bill was still legal tender. The kids parents were planning to sue the school board and the police, I lost track so I don't know how it went.

Sent from my Lenovo TB2-X30F using Tapatalk
I have wondered how things would go if I tried spending the bills and coins I still have, it would be fun just to see the looks on the faces of the cashiers.
 
I have wondered how things would go if I tried spending the bills and coins I still have, it would be fun just to see the looks on the faces of the cashiers.
I got four mint $1 consecutively numbered silver certificates from the '60s in change once. I was quite happy with them as something to frame, stopped in the bank drive through and asked, still legal tender. Wife saw them and that was the last I saw them.

Sent from my Lenovo TB2-X30F using Tapatalk
 
I got four mint $1 consecutively numbered silver certificates from the '60s in change once. I was quite happy with them as something to frame, stopped in the bank drive through and asked, still legal tender. Wife saw them and that was the last I saw them.

Sent from my Lenovo TB2-X30F using Tapatalk
Did you ever wonder how much she got for them?
 
Another gem from Another Fine Mess, British motorist Tim Moore’s account of crossing the continental USA in a Model T Ford via Trump-voting areas ($1.99 on Kindle):

...Scooping out silver to supplement the breakfast waitress’s tip, I’d been struck by another pig-headed native anachronism. The highest denomination coin in mass circulation was still the quarter, with a face value of less than 20p. My pockets always jangled heavily: I had to harvest quarters, ready to stuff them by the fistful into a forecourt air compressor, or a motel washer or tumble dryer.​
Every few years the US Treasury attempts to relaunch the dollar coin, reminding Americans of the vast savings the nation could make with a switch from dollar bills (the current estimate is $ 4.4 billion over thirty years, the typical life of a coin). And every time it fails. Of the 1.4 billion dollar coins ever minted, over half have been returned, unloved and unwanted, to federal reserve banks. I didn’t encounter a single one of the circulating remainders. Consumers just can’t be doing with them. They want a great sweaty wodge of good old American greenbacks.​
The federal authorities could of course force the issue by removing dollar bills from circulation, as the Canadian authorities did all the way back in 1989 (a year after the Bank of England killed off the pound note). But they won’t, because they’re too scared of the backlash. As I would discover, the most reviled adjective in Middle America is that other F-word: federal.​
The American small-town public is so conservative, so obstinately proud of its parochial old ways, so deeply hostile to federal meddling, that the authorities haven’t even dared to change the size of its coins in over a hundred years. As a result, pennies, nickels and dimes all now cost more to produce than their face value. Minting a one-cent coin sets the Treasury back 1.7 cents. What a remarkable state of affairs.​
The Bank of England introduced plastic banknotes while I was away. If the US Treasury tried to pull that, Donald Trump could probably declare himself emperor and be done with it...​
I have a huge jar that all the nickels, dimes and quarters go into, when it's full I take it to the bank and get the greenbacks in return.
 
Another contender for the Darwin Awards, but once again shows the deadly combination of American gun ownership and gross stupidity. His parents must be so chuffed!

'Paloma Williams, 24, was blasted in the chest during deadly foreplay with her new lover Andrew Shinault, 23, The Sun reports. The pair had been dating for only a fortnight but they had played with a gun during previous encounters, it has emerged. Mr Shinault told the police he and Ms Williams were using a 9mm Taurus for “sexual gratification and arousal” at his home in Valrico, Florida.

'According to graphic new details about the tragic night, Mr Shinault told detectives he was sitting on the edge of his bed with Paloma between his legs. The brunette’s back was facing a TV set on a desk. Mr Shinault, who is being held for manslaughter, said Ms Williams first rubbed the weapon along his body. Then he did the same to her. When he held it to her chest he pulled the trigger and the gun went off.

'Ms Williams fell and Mr Shinault yelled for his parents, who were downstairs. She died later in hospital.'


Woman shot dead in sex game gone wrong
Presumably if he tried to blow his own brains out he would miss?
 
I’m currently absorbed in Another Fine Mess, British motorist Tim Moore’s account of crossing the continental USA in a Model T Ford via Trump-voting areas ($1.99 on Kindle) and it’s worth it for this passage alone:

‘...Obviously Trump is a jackass, but, you know–we’re Republicans.’ Paul shrugged helplessly: his preference, one he had bolstered with campaign donations, had been the inestimably less appalling Ohio governor, John Kasich. I could only sympathise. This must be how it feels when the football club you’ve supported all your life appoints a manager you find it very difficult to warm to, on the grounds that he’s an absolutely colossal anus. And who then wins the league, but does it by playing with seventeen Russians up front.​
‘So, Tim, you think we’ve had our day as number one?’
The question seemed an obvious follow-on, and the catch in Paul’s voice suggested he already knew my answer. Putting Donald Trump in the White House was hardly the act of a confident, optimistic nation, comfortable in its own skin. I hadn’t been alone in seeing his election as an end-of-era event, a superpower on the wane raging against the dying of its light. When had that light shone brightest?​
Since setting off I’d been routinely struck by the anachronistic trappings of daily life, the fixtures and fittings that dated America’s high-water mark to somewhere around 1962. The weedy 110-volt power supply that struggled to boil my bedroom kettles. The crappy, wobbly two-pin plugs. The cumbersome top-load washers in the motel laundry, like props from a monochrome sitcom. The speed-stick deodorant that I’d bought by default in a West Virginian pharmacy, a real blast from the personal-care past which harvested short and curlies while pasting my pits in mentholated lard.​
However poorly all these accoutrements had aged, half a century back they were the trailblazing future. Domestic appliances and hot showers for all! America was a proving ground for the modern way of first-world living. It proudly invented all these home comforts, then popularised and standardised them, while the rest of the benighted, unwashed, steam-powered world looked on in awe. For more than half a century, they led and we followed. They were number one by a million miles.​
I remember when my American cousin Patricia, Miles’s partner, first visited us in London in 1976, and left her toiletries laid out in the family bathroom. I was agog. A bottle of strawberry hair conditioner held particular fascination. I’d never even heard of hair conditioner–I’m pretty sure it didn’t exist in Britain back then, except perhaps as some harshly medicated slurry that stank like Vicks VapoRub and made your scalp shriek. This stuff was a creamy pale rose and (sorry, Patricia) smelled good enough to drink. It was also graced with a runic robot tattoo–the first barcode I had ever seen. Patricia had bottled the future and brought it over.​
But that was about as far as they got. Europe and the Far East stealthily reeled them in, and because Americans never leave their country–Patricia was the exception that proved this rule–they didn’t notice. When my wife and I first watched Friends back in the mid-1990s, we were amazed to see Chandler dispense high-end Manhattanite sarcasm into a house-phone the size of a wine box, the sort of hulking embarrassment even my parents had long since chucked out. And because Americans are so cocksure and headstrong, even when they belatedly did notice, they took forever to react. The fossil-fuelled, eight-track American Way was the original and best...​
Whats primitive about a top loading washer? Front loaders are a Euro idea designed to fit under a counter in the, smaller , Euro kitchens.

Our top loader stands in a separate laundry next to the stupid front loading drier, which sits on a base to raise it off the floor.
 
Whats primitive about a top loading washer? Front loaders are a Euro idea designed to fit under a counter in the, smaller , Euro kitchens.

Our top loader stands in a separate laundry next to the stupid front loading drier, which sits on a base to raise it off the floor.
Same here, it's a washing machine and a dryer that both do their jobs, besides SWMBO deals with the washing so I don't give a fùck how the load or empty.
 
Another contender for the Darwin Awards, but once again shows the deadly combination of American gun ownership and gross stupidity. His parents must be so chuffed!

'Paloma Williams, 24, was blasted in the chest during deadly foreplay with her new lover Andrew Shinault, 23, The Sun reports. The pair had been dating for only a fortnight but they had played with a gun during previous encounters, it has emerged. Mr Shinault told the police he and Ms Williams were using a 9mm Taurus for “sexual gratification and arousal” at his home in Valrico, Florida.

'According to graphic new details about the tragic night, Mr Shinault told detectives he was sitting on the edge of his bed with Paloma between his legs. The brunette’s back was facing a TV set on a desk. Mr Shinault, who is being held for manslaughter, said Ms Williams first rubbed the weapon along his body. Then he did the same to her. When he held it to her chest he pulled the trigger and the gun went off.

'Ms Williams fell and Mr Shinault yelled for his parents, who were downstairs. She died later in hospital.'

Woman shot dead in sex game gone wrong
Sounds like a joint EM/Darwin op. The only thing that's missing are a few of the blokes mates. Then it would have been a gang bang.

Byee!
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
jumpinjarhead US 29
Mr_C_Hinecap US 11
POGscribbler The NAAFI Bar 78

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top