America - its all a bit odd...

I read your post with interest, my short stay in Bern was a blessed relief from the loonesy of BAOR at that time, and I never got the chance to further afield, what I saw of it was totally different from most mainstream city's and towns I had visited in Germany, Austria and all points north. Berns topography is amazing, built around valleys and hills, untouched by war for more than 400 years, but as you say, different strokes for different blokes, and being married, the traditional "single bloke away from home" thing wasn't an option.
Never been to Bern, but and as you say, things are different for different people, but for me as a single guy who hardly knew anyone in Switzerland, apart from colleagues - a few drinks with them were OK - it was mind numbingly boring.

At least in London, it's easier to just go out and strike up a convo (even if more difficult that in the U.S.) - but not there! At least, not for me and I barely spoke any German or French.
 
Couldn't they chop him up before throwing him in? Ends up as ash anyway, frying him in pieces is quicker and easier than frying him at once.

It's up there with those fat bastards who have to go to the zoo for a check since they can't fit in regular human size medical machines.

Obese patients: Zoo scanners to be used for those too large to fit in hospital ones | Daily Mail Online
 
In Ridgefield Connecticut USA, the local baseball field was wet before a game, so someone thought it would be a good idea to pour gasoline on it and set it on fire to try to dry it out.
Ridgefield baseball field closed due to 'poor decision' to douse it in gas, set it on fire

As you could imagine however, things did not go according to plan. The soil, still soaked with plenty of gasoline despite the flames, must now be scraped up and hauled away to be decontaminated and new soil brought in to replace it.

This being the US, I'm surprised they didn't try shooting the field with their guns when the gasoline idea didn't work out.

It was a Saturday morning when families were gathered at the baseball field at Ridgefield High School.

When the fire started burning, someone left the field and ran across the street to the police department.

"It had rained the night before there was a scheduled baseball game," explained Captain Shawn Platt.

Someone thought it would be a good idea to warm the field in time for Ridgefield and Amity Regional to play ball.

Video was shot by a teacher showing the moment after 24 gallons of gasoline were poured on the infield and set on fire.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Driving in Dixie years ago, lots of squashed armadillos about. Me: 'There's another one'. As we got closer it was a chunk of cast-off truck tyre. Mrs S: 'That's a tired armadillo'.
 
The owner of the Smuggler's Inn in the US near the Canadian border has apparently been charged with smuggling. I guess it would have been difficult to see that one coming.
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/smugglers-inn-blaine-washington-people-smuggling-allegations-1.5089505?cmp=rss
He was apparently smuggling people from the US into Canada, on the border with BC.
The proprietor of a U.S. border-town bed and breakfast has been charged with 21 counts under the Immigration Act for "inducing, aiding or abetting" seven people who attempted to illegally enter Canada.
He is currently enjoying Her Majesty's hospitality facilities in BC.
Court records filed April 4 show that Boulé remains in custody in Canada. None of the allegations have been proven.
Here's a picture of the inn. You can see what appears to be the border marker just to the right of the hotel, with Canada just to the right of it. Evidently we need to build a wall and make the Americans pay for it.
 
I'm not sure if this one belongs here, but it's probably not worth starting a new thread for it.
www.cbc.ca/news/business/us-mexico-border-trade-1.5090427?cmp=rss

The US have pulled customs and immigration people off commercial duties on the US-Mexico border and sent them to handle the backlog of refugee claimants from Central America. This has resulted in huge backlogs of commercial shipments from Mexico to the US. That in turn threatens to shut down large parts of the American auto industry which relies on parts from Mexico.

Long delays at the U.S.-Mexico border crossing for goods destined for American plants and consumers are hitting the U.S. auto industry, and the gridlock reduced by half the number of northbound trucks that crossed the entry point last week.
Washington's decision to move some 750 agents from commercial to immigration duties to handle a surge in families seeking asylum in the United States has triggered the delays at crucial ports on a border that handle $1.7 billion in daily trade.
"The situation in Ciudad Juarez is very serious because these auto parts go to plants in the United States and obviously they put at risk the operation in the United States," Eduardo Solis, the president of the Mexican Auto Industry Association (AMIA), said on Monday.
The freight backlog is huge and growing. If this continues, it will not be economically sustainable.
Seventeen hours before the crossing to El Paso even opened on Monday morning, trucks were already lining up in Ciudad Juarez to avoid the fate of some 7,500 trailers that failed to cross last week, said Manuel Sotelo, vice president at the Mexican National Chamber of Freight Transport's north division.
That is roughly half the number of trucks per week that usually cross there, carrying everything from car and plane parts to refrigerators, washing machines, TVs, cellphones and computers.
"This is not normal. We had never seen this before in Ciudad Juarez," said Sotelo.
 
That in turn threatens to shut down large parts of the American auto industry which relies on parts from Mexico.
Lol. That's an understatement, if I have seen one. Having worked and having an intimate knowledge of the U.S auto industry, I can tell you that it would be screwed if not for Mexican part suppliers and whole built cars.
 
Lol. That's an understatement, if I have seen one. Having worked and having an intimate knowledge of the U.S auto industry, I can tell you that it would be screwed if not for Mexican part suppliers and whole built cars.
Given that the industry runs on a JIT basis, it won't take much of that before plants in the US start shutting down. The side effects will reach into Canada as well.

I imagine auto company executives are burning up the phone lines to Washington already.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Never been to Bern, but and as you say, things are different for different people, but for me as a single guy who hardly knew anyone in Switzerland, apart from colleagues - a few drinks with them were OK - it was mind numbingly boring.

At least in London, it's easier to just go out and strike up a convo (even if more difficult that in the U.S.) - but not there! At least, not for me and I barely spoke any German or French.
Bern is the most boring city in Switzerland by some considerable margin. Zurich and Basel are much better and much more cosmopolitan - Zurich because many other nationalities have moved there for work, and Basel, because of its location, has a multi-national/linguistic tradition.
But you are right. It takes a long time to get to know the Swiss, they are definitely slow burners. However, once you have made friends with them they are friends for life. In Zurich it is much easier to rub along with the large anglophone ex-pat community of Brits, Americans, and various shades of antipodeans.
I still miss living near Zurich and I have been away for 23 years, so visit every other year.
 
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