America - its all a bit odd...

State of Georgia Democrats introduce bill requiring Men to report all ejaculations over age 55 to local law enforcement

I shit you not this is a real bill

HB 604 2019-2020 Regular Session
The purpose wasn't to enforce vinegar strokes - it was a response to abortion laws.
In the US, the vast majority of interest and laws passed for abortion are done by males. So 2 females were playing the same strategy with men's biological "issues".

Also, if the law does pass and you don't report it do you go to jail? And, would you be a sex offender? Embarrassing at the next job interview i would assume.

Georgia bill would require men to report every release of sperm to officers
 
Probably. Though, when I think of GA and politicians, I can't picture any young thrusting ones. I don't even really anyone from there politico wise, apart from the fictional Frank Underwood (Spacey) - who I can't stand now.

There'll be even fewer thrusters if they're going to have to report to the police after each thrusting...
 
You may have heard about the scandal in the US over university admissions. Wealthy and influential parents have been bribing their kids' way into top universities across the US after they failed to qualify.

This being the US, someone has wasted no time in suing for $500 billion over her child supposedly not being accepted at university due to places being taken by parents who paid bribes to get their own child in.
U.S. college admissions scandal sparks multiple lawsuits | CBC News
A $500-billion US civil lawsuit filed by a parent on Wednesday in San Francisco accused 45 defendants of defrauding and inflicting emotional distress on everyone whose "rights to a fair chance at entrance to college" were stolen through their alleged conspiracy.

(...) Jennifer Kay Toy, a former teacher in Oakland, Calif., said she believed her son Joshua was not admitted to some colleges, despite his 4.2 grade point average, because wealthy parents thought it was "OK to lie, cheat, steal and bribe their children's way into a good college."
I'm not sure there's a huge moral difference between bribing your child's way into university and filing a lawsuit demanding $500 billion because of something you read about in the news. But this is America, where what is seen as somewhat odd to people in the rest of the world is normal behaviour in the US.
 
Wealthy and influential parents have been bribing their kids' way into top universities across the US after they failed to qualify.
I personally don't think that endemic to the U.S. in particular. Goes on around the world. Whack in a few donations and you get your kid in. And this is not just Unis but also schools.

But hard to single out the U.S. specifically for this. Not that I am defending it. I went to Michigan, a top 10 school - I dunno how I managed to get in - but it certainly was not through wealth.
 
I personally don't think that endemic to the U.S. in particular. Goes on around the world. Whack in a few donations and you get your kid in. And this is not just Unis but also schools.

But hard to single out the U.S. specifically for this. Not that I am defending it. I went to Michigan, a top 10 school - I dunno how I managed to get in - but it certainly was not through wealth.
You were a legacy I'll bet. ;-)

Flounder.jpg
 
You may have heard about the scandal in the US over university admissions. Wealthy and influential parents have been bribing their kids' way into top universities across the US after they failed to qualify.

This being the US, someone has wasted no time in suing for $500 billion over her child supposedly not being accepted at university due to places being taken by parents who paid bribes to get their own child in.
U.S. college admissions scandal sparks multiple lawsuits | CBC News


I'm not sure there's a huge moral difference between bribing your child's way into university and filing a lawsuit demanding $500 billion because of something you read about in the news. But this is America, where what is seen as somewhat odd to people in the rest of the world is normal behaviour in the US.
It's not occurred to you that suing for $500bn might be seen as odd by Americans then? Just because one person does it, doesn't mean the rest of the country thinks it's kosher.
 
I personally don't think that endemic to the U.S. in particular. Goes on around the world. Whack in a few donations and you get your kid in. And this is not just Unis but also schools.

But hard to single out the U.S. specifically for this. Not that I am defending it. I went to Michigan, a top 10 school - I dunno how I managed to get in - but it certainly was not through wealth.
Was a top ten school, #11 now.......time to head to DeVry boost to up your CV......
 
I personally don't think that endemic to the U.S. in particular. Goes on around the world. Whack in a few donations and you get your kid in. And this is not just Unis but also schools.

But hard to single out the U.S. specifically for this. Not that I am defending it. I went to Michigan, a top 10 school - I dunno how I managed to get in - but it certainly was not through wealth.
The point I was making was more about how this it is so typical of the US for someone to latch onto a topic in the news and find an excuse to sue for $500 billion than about the bribery scandal itself.

As you've raised the subject however, I read a news story today which brought up a rather interesting aspect about all this. For some time now there has been the attitude of many people in the US who see a black person from a poor family at an American university and assume that they only got in because the university need to fill a quota for blacks. Well, now we find out that there are lots of rich white people who got in only because they were rich. It puts a rather interesting perspective on things. I suspect we won't have heard the last of this aspect.

The same story also referenced this interesting study from the US which compared attitudes towards higher education in Canada and the US. ERIC - The Channeling of Student Competition in Higher Education: Comparing Canada and the U.S., Journal of Higher Education, 2005
I've only read the summary, but this following is the interesting bit:
While Canadian and American students are experiencing very similar pressures and are enrolling in higher education at similar rates, their responses to the new competition differ. Whereas students in the U.S. compete for access to elite colleges, students in Canada compete for elite majors. Where one studies is seen as more important in the U.S.; what one studies dominates in Canada.
In short, in Canada what matters most is what you studied rather than where you studied it. In the US what matters most is where you studied rather than what you studied. The news story elaborated on this with noting that Americans associate closely with their university "brand", while this is much less common amongst Canadians. The explanation for this is that in the US universities tend to act as a forum in which elites can meet one another and make useful connections, while in Canada this happens through other channels. The result is that "exclusive" US universities will market their exclusivity as a means of obtaining a career advantage while in Canada there would be little point to it.

This is a rather interesting sociological aspect which I hadn't been aware of. I had occasionally wondered why Americans would bang on about what university they went to as I couldn't imagine why anyone would care in most cases. Now I see that they are calling out to one another their affiliation as part of their "brand identity".
 
IIRC a consequence of Asian students suing Harvard was that we learned that one of the most disadvantaged groups was white students who *weren't* legacy, faculty kids, big donors, rounders/shit rugby/whatever, or on the principal's special favourites list (because that was a thing).

Also, the driver of discrimination against the Asians was exactly that they were less likely to get a gimme because dad played lacrosse or some such. People think Oxbridge is bad, but that's really something.

It makes the outright corruption look almost honest. Your kid's covered in fur? Tentacles? You're literally the Beverly Hillbillies? Just give us the money.
 
It's them slantie eye'd peoples fault then!

Not rich white people paying to get their kids into college?
I think you should go back and read that again.

The Asian students' lawsuit resulted in Harvard 'fessing up to how crooked it is on an average Tuesday. The college had to admit to the numbers I mentioned and the existence of the special mates' rates list.
 
This is a rather interesting sociological aspect which I hadn't been aware of. I had occasionally wondered why Americans would bang on about what university they went to as I couldn't imagine why anyone would care in most cases. Now I see that they are calling out to one another their affiliation as part of their "brand identity".
Obviously you didn’t go to Western or Laurier.......
 
It's not occurred to you that suing for $500bn might be seen as odd by Americans then? Just because one person does it, doesn't mean the rest of the country thinks it's kosher.
Not sure about other regions in Canada, but around here 80% of the television stations picked up are American. You cannot watch one set of commercials without seeing lawyers selling their services either trying to get you to sue for a couple of million for a slip and fall, back, neck injury, etc, or entice you to join a billion dollar class action. Trying to get outrageous sums of money suing is the way Americans potray themselves, so a $500 bn lawsuit just seems par for course........
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
Not sure about other regions in Canada, but around here 80% of the television stations picked up are American. You cannot watch one set of commercials without seeing lawyers selling their services either trying to get you to sue for a couple of million for a slip and fall, back, neck injury, etc, or entice you to join a billion dollar class action. Trying to get outrageous sums of money suing is the way Americans potray themselves, so a $500 bn lawsuit just seems par for course........
I'm afraid that daytime television in the UK is very similar. Adverts for Ambulance Chasers R Us followed by 'facilitating' mis-sold pensions or PPI claims and then an advert for paying for your funeral.

It does make working from home a frustrating experience on occasion (i.e. when you've forgotten to mute the adverts).
 
I'm afraid that daytime television in the UK is very similar. Adverts for Ambulance Chasers R Us followed by 'facilitating' mis-sold pensions or PPI claims and then an advert for paying for your funeral.

It does make working from home a frustrating experience on occasion (i.e. when you've forgotten to mute the adverts).
Just get Netflix, you damn heathen!
 
Not sure about other regions in Canada, but around here 80% of the television stations picked up are American. You cannot watch one set of commercials without seeing lawyers selling their services either trying to get you to sue for a couple of million for a slip and fall, back, neck injury, etc, or entice you to join a billion dollar class action. Trying to get outrageous sums of money suing is the way Americans potray themselves, so a $500 bn lawsuit just seems par for course........
I had to take the GRE back in the day, I want 4 million for the pain and suffering I endured on the math portion of that bitch.
 
Not sure about other regions in Canada, but around here 80% of the television stations picked up are American. You cannot watch one set of commercials without seeing lawyers selling their services either trying to get you to sue for a couple of million for a slip and fall, back, neck injury, etc, or entice you to join a billion dollar class action. Trying to get outrageous sums of money suing is the way Americans potray themselves, so a $500 bn lawsuit just seems par for course........
I don't watch much TV, so never ran into that. But it certainly sounds as though your interpretation is as you say. Whether one could infer that the American population at large intend to portray themselves in that way, rather than American lawyers portraying themselves that way is not something that automatically follows, in my book.

That said, I was in Florida a few weeks back, and there are numerous billboards at the side of I-75 and the Florida Turnpike doing exactly that. But not nearly so noticeable round here (Tennessee), or in Atlanta, where I still spend quite a bit of time.

If that's the general trend, I don't like it.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top