America - its all a bit odd...

This page numbering thing - it is common in manuals all around the world, and some text books. British Army AESP (Army Equipment Support Publications) did something similar.

I think the idea with manuals is that it was easier to issue amendments using that format, otherwise the page numbers would be all to shit if there was a new procedure added, or a section/procedure deleted. Of course with modern word processing, the page numbering is a complete non-issue (or should be), but manuals existed well before computers did. (...)
What you just said rang a bell and caused me to pull out a manual for a German industrial control system to check, and sure enough it uses the "chapter - page" numbering system. This was printed in Germany for word-wide distribution and so has nothing to do with American oddities.

And if you look at their PDF versions, they're exactly the same way, "chapter - page". Here's an example.
https://cache.industry.siemens.com/dl/files/056/18652056/att_70829/v1/S7prv54_e.pdf

I believe the reason is as you said, it allows for updates to be issued without replacing the entire manual. Their older manuals were issued in binders, and corrections were issued as pages which you would use to replace the originals.

Their later manuals were softcover bound versions, but they kept the same numbering system. The PDF versions were identical to the bound manuals, including page numbering. I suspect the same software was used to create both.
 
Admiralty List of Radio Signals corrections. Done with a pair of scissors and a Pritt stick. Always good for whiling away a watch or two :mrgreen:
When I left the mob and joined the company I currently work for, I did a brief spell helping out our technical publications department. There they had the master sheets for the manuals, and in order to amend them they literally cut the words out, rearranged them and stuck them back down again. I had to make a minor change to one sheet, but because the master was in a secure storage facility it would take two days to arrive. To save twiddling my fingers for two days, I suggested that I draft up the whole page on MSWord (this was the mid 00's) and it would give them an idea of what the finished article would look like. It took me about two hours to get the headers, footers and text drawn up, and when I handed it to the head bloke it was like Guttenberg had just run off the first manuscript! There was much conferring and mumbling and checking for witchcraft before I was asked how long did I reckon it would take to do the whole chapter.

At the end of that short stint in tech pubs I went back to the day job, and they wrote my boss a nice memo saying how useful I had been and had shown them several methods for improving their efficiency. The charmless bottom feeder had the gall to ask me why I didn't work for him like that....!
 
When I left the mob and joined the company I currently work for, I did a brief spell helping out our technical publications department. There they had the master sheets for the manuals, and in order to amend them they literally cut the words out, rearranged them and stuck them back down again. I had to make a minor change to one sheet, but because the master was in a secure storage facility it would take two days to arrive. To save twiddling my fingers for two days, I suggested that I draft up the whole page on MSWord (this was the mid 00's) and it would give them an idea of what the finished article would look like. It took me about two hours to get the headers, footers and text drawn up, and when I handed it to the head bloke it was like Guttenberg had just run off the first manuscript! There was much conferring and mumbling and checking for witchcraft before I was asked how long did I reckon it would take to do the whole chapter.

At the end of that short stint in tech pubs I went back to the day job, and they wrote my boss a nice memo saying how useful I had been and had shown them several methods for improving their efficiency. The charmless bottom feeder had the gall to ask me why I didn't work for him like that....!

The problem with ALRS is that they're scattered throughout the world on ships of all types and the only way to get corrections to them is to send them sheets of paper with instructions like 'replace line 2 and 3 on page 453 with the following'. Correcting charts was even worse involving a set of Rotring pens with various coloured inks.
 
When I left the mob and joined the company I currently work for, I did a brief spell helping out our technical publications department. There they had the master sheets for the manuals, and in order to amend them they literally cut the words out, rearranged them and stuck them back down again. I had to make a minor change to one sheet, but because the master was in a secure storage facility it would take two days to arrive. To save twiddling my fingers for two days, I suggested that I draft up the whole page on MSWord (this was the mid 00's) and it would give them an idea of what the finished article would look like. It took me about two hours to get the headers, footers and text drawn up, and when I handed it to the head bloke it was like Guttenberg had just run off the first manuscript! There was much conferring and mumbling and checking for witchcraft before I was asked how long did I reckon it would take to do the whole chapter.

At the end of that short stint in tech pubs I went back to the day job, and they wrote my boss a nice memo saying how useful I had been and had shown them several methods for improving their efficiency. The charmless bottom feeder had the gall to ask me why I didn't work for him like that....!
The example I gave above in the link was from 2006, and they had everything in PDF on their web site well before then. A lot of companies were phasing out printed copies altogether by then and relying on PDF or HTML.
 
The example I gave above in the link was from 2006, and they had everything in PDF on their web site well before then. A lot of companies were phasing out printed copies altogether by then and relying on PDF or HTML.
We use loads of diagrams and lists of various types for engineering, that change very often. The guiding principle is that there is only one official repository and as soon as you print something it may be obsolete already.

We don't even send copies of things by email, just links.
 
We use loads of diagrams and lists of various types for engineering, that change very often. The guiding principle is that there is only one official repository and as soon as you print something it may be obsolete already.

We don't even send copies of things by email, just links.
Yep. This is the standard practice these days for most companies. They clearly mention this on the PDF itself, asking you to check the link given for the latest "live" version.
 
Only in America? In Australia it could have been a similar toll from a single vehicle (ute) accident in the Northern Territory.

'Twenty people were killed when a wedding-limo crash spilt over into a busy restaurant parking lot in upstate New York, officials and reports have said. Eighteen of the dead were travelling in the limo, while two were bystanders, a person with knowledge of the investigation told The Associated Press.'

Many dead after wedding limo crash
 
The problem with ALRS is that they're scattered throughout the world on ships of all types and the only way to get corrections to them is to send them sheets of paper with instructions like 'replace line 2 and 3 on page 453 with the following'. Correcting charts was even worse involving a set of Rotring pens with various coloured inks.
A couple of weeks ago a second mate was explaining to me how he does his chart corrections these days. He receives an e-mail with an attachment, the attachment is downloaded onto a USB stick which is then plugged into the ships ECDIS system, press a tit and it all happens. The whole lot done in a few minutes. No paper charts no pens or notices to mariners.
 
A couple of weeks ago a second mate was explaining to me how he does his chart corrections these days. He receives an e-mail with an attachment, the attachment is downloaded onto a USB stick which is then plugged into the ships ECDIS system, press a tit and it all happens. The whole lot done in a few minutes. No paper charts no pens or notices to mariners.
What will they ever think of next?
 
What will they ever think of next?
Corrupting the file so that every chart in his memory bank is erased permanently; or if they're really clever, subtly altering the numbers so the deep water channel is just far enough off for no one to notice until there's that awkward, "Why aren't we moving" moment.
 
Gotta love it.
At the end of this month, millions of kids in the States (and sadly, worldwide) will be dressing up as witches, wizards and the like and 'demanding with menace'.
I find if you sneak out the back door while the first bunch are making their grab, get round behind them and shout "Woo" in a loud voice as they walk back out of the garden they tell all their mates and no one else comes to your house all night; and they were 15 year olds.
 

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LE
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