America - its all a bit odd...

Just want to come back to this question as the latest Matalan catalogue arrived in the post yesterday. The men's section all have svelte male models.

The women's section has a couple of pages like this:
View attachment 354242

I'm undecided whether that's a good thing though. Is it men in denial or a message to say it's ok for women to be fat but not men?
I get ads for ladies' swimsuits fairly regularly while reading ARRSE (along with ads for marijuana - the site COs are evidently raking in the drug cash). While most of them are slender (but not supermodel-style concentration camp survivor skinny), there is one model in the rotation who is a bit on the larger size. She still looks very good though, and I suppose that larger women who see that ad will imagine themselves to look like her if they buy that swimsuit.

For men's clothing it probably matters less as unlike women's clothing where the styling differs according to size, men's clothes are all the same, just with different sizes.
 
Oh god, the fecking redcoats are back again...and on an American (well, technically, Italian?) vehicle? Sacrilege!

What do you mean "technically Italian"? The Challenger (1st Gen) came out in 1970 when Chrysler Corporation was one of the Big Three and wasn't partnered with anyone else. It reached back to those days when they dusted off the old blueprints and came out with the 2nd Gen Challenger. Its nice to have the stability that Fiat brings to the mix with its bankroll, but there's no Italian blood in the Challenger. (Chrysler has learned something though from the Europeans and they have made a car that handles well. I certainly enjoy driving my Challenger II at a spirited pace. 100 mph, etc.)
 
What do you mean "technically Italian"? The Challenger (1st Gen) came out in 1970 when Chrysler Corporation was one of the Big Three and wasn't partnered with anyone else. It reached back to those days when they dusted off the old blueprints and came out with the 2nd Gen Challenger. Its nice to have the stability that Fiat brings to the mix with its bankroll, but there's no Italian blood in the Challenger. (Chrysler has learned something though from the Europeans and they have made a car that handles well. I certainly enjoy driving my Challenger II at a spirited pace. 100 mph, etc.)
I meant Chrysler. Now that they are owned by the Italians..well FCA.
 
Just read this on Reddit. Someone was complaining that the Chicago police weren't taking his hit and run complaint seriously. The reply was:

"If you’re not providing donuts, a six-figure pension or the opportunity to shoot someone, why would they talk to you? " :mrgreen:
 
I don't know about the plate, but the mass of chrome I see filling my screen is certainly cringeworthy.
Not much choice to be honest. Most full size trucks come with chrome grilles, unless you get the work truck spec.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
 
At what point did someone decide to use the name for an alcoholic drink for the raw ingredient, and why? There must be a reason behind this.
late 13c. (in a biblical context), "strong liquor;" mid-14c., "liquor made from the juice of fruits," from Old French cidre, cire "pear or apple cider" (12c., Modern French cidre), variant of cisdre, from Late Latin sicera, Vulgate rendition of Hebrew shekhar, a word used for any strong drink (translated in Old English as beor, taken untranslated in Septuagint Greek as sikera), related to Arabic sakar "strong drink," sakira "was drunk."

Meaning gradually narrowed in English to mean exclusively "fermented drink made from apples," though this sense also was in Old French. Later applied to any expressed juice of apples, either before or after fermentation (19c.). The former is distinguished as sweet cider, the latter as hard cider.

From etymonline.com.
 
Could've gone for the "murdered out" option.



And while at it, stick a lift kit on it, for the ultimate bro truck. Brah.
That's a 2500 with Cummins motor and megacab. About 60% more expensive, so no thanks!
 
Of late there has been a fair few foreign actors playing parts of Americans or other nationalities. Two that spring to mind are the two guys in the telly show Strikeback. In that show it was an Australian playing the part of an American and an American playing the part of an Englishmen. I thought both played their parts really well.
Hugh Laurie suprised a few Yanks after the TV show "House" when they realised he is English.
 
As to accents (drift, it's not the US) in NZ I once met two great aunts who had emigrated there over forty years before and kept house together with the husband of one of them. One aunt spoke broad Kiwi, the other still spoke as one would expect of an English parson's daughter.
There is also the matter of the appreciation of an accent by the listener. My aunt, born and bred in Lincolnshire, emigrated to NZ 1947 and her two daughters, born and bred on North Island NZ are indistinguishable to me both on the phone and when we occasionally meet. They all confirm that my aunt's accent still marks her out as ex-English to other locals.
 

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