America - its all a bit odd...

I have the slightly embarrassing habit of developing an American accent when I'm stateside.
Really?

I've been here 30+ years and still have a broad Jockanese accent. SWMBO's accent, her being American is interspersed with bits of Jockanese.
Speaking of accents...here we have an English actor playing an American who is trying to do an English accent. o_O


Have to admit that I didn't know that Dominic West (aka McNulty) was a Brit till after I finished the series. He did a pretty decent job of pulling off a broad Baltimore-ish accent.
 
So you went to an actual public public school and not a private public school, like here in the UK.
And attended both public (private) and state (public) schools in the UK! ;-)
 
Speaking of accents...here we have an English actor playing an American who is trying to do an English accent. o_O


Have to admit that I didn't know that Dominic West (aka McNulty) was a Brit till after I finished the series. He did a pretty decent job of pulling off a broad Baltimore-ish accent.
I thought David Morrissey did an excellent Southern accent in The Walking Dead, especially after finding out he is Liverpool born and bred. His brother was deputy head (vice principal) of my daughters' high school.
 
On the cider subthread, good luck explaining to the cousins that it's also the favourite of a) teenagers with no money wanting the cheapest way to raise hell b) desperate winos
 
Speaking of accents...here we have an English actor playing an American who is trying to do an English accent. o_O


Have to admit that I didn't know that Dominic West (aka McNulty) was a Brit till after I finished the series. He did a pretty decent job of pulling off a broad Baltimore-ish accent.

Dominic West went to Eton (the private public school)...
 
We spent 5 weeks in drydock in Oakland (California). Went for a haircut one day and apart from the barber misinterpreting 'short on the sides and a tapered neck' to mean I wanted to look like Private Pyle he explained that the big framed certificate on his wall was a license from the state government to permit him to cut hair.

He was a little stunned when I explained that all you needed in the UK to set up as a barber was a chair and a pair of scissors.
 
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In the same way that beer is barley juice ;)

More seriously, scrumpy is a name for 'traditional' ciders made in the west of the UK. Think hard cider but cloudy, a lot stronger (some get up to around 10% alcohol) and disturbingly drinkable. Then you try going to the toilet after 5 pints and realise your legs don't work properly any more.
...and then the next morning you want to find a breadknife and cut your head off.
 
I usually roll with this on a weekend..

Not legal for sale in Massachusetts but when I was a university student (back when dinosaurs were roaming) it was legal in Washington DC. I recall students making punch with grapefruit juice and grape juice (calling the mixture Purple Jesus) and floating a bit of dry ice on the top to add a foggy effect. I do recall at one such party a couple of Chem majors brought a litre of lab alcohol, 95% Ethyl they said. At one point as drink took effect one started mumbling something about did the container say ethyl or methyl which put some off. Had to have been ethyl as I don't recall anyone going blind or dying.
 
When I was 10 we went to live in Australia for a while. My Mum was worried that I wasn't eating properly so she took me to see the Doc. He told her to give me a glass of dry sherry before meals as it would increase my appetite.
According to my mum, when my older brother was teething the nurse told her to rub sherry on his gums. Up to his [very untimely at the age of 54] dying day he knew that no matter what, a nip of sherry and he'd be asleep in 5 minutes!
 
Not legal for sale in Massachusetts but when I was a university student (back when dinosaurs were roaming) it was legal in Washington DC. I recall students making punch with grapefruit juice and grape juice (calling the mixture Purple Jesus) and floating a bit of dry ice on the top to add a foggy effect. I do recall at one such party a couple of Chem majors brought a litre of lab alcohol, 95% Ethyl they said. At one point as drink took effect one started mumbling something about did the container say ethyl or methyl which put some off. Had to have been ethyl as I don't recall anyone going blind or dying.
These are great for making punches at frat parties. The most bang for your buck. If all you're going to do is use "some alcohol" into your shitty fruit punch, you really can't go wrong with this.
 
It’s a fair point, but how many “female” mannequins do you see with realistically fat arses?
Just want to come back to this question as the latest Matalan catalogue arrived in the post yesterday. The men's section all have svelte male models.

The women's section has a couple of pages like this:
20180923_101256-600x800.jpg


I'm undecided whether that's a good thing though. Is it men in denial or a message to say it's ok for women to be fat but not men?
 
Just want to come back to this question as the latest Matalan catalogue arrived in the post yesterday. The men's section all have svelte male models.

The women's section has a couple of pages like this:
View attachment 354242

I'm undecided whether that's a good thing though. Is it men in denial or a message to say it's ok for women to be fat but not men?
A whole new market place for the manufacturers of women clothes.
Men of course just reckon their shirts have shrunk in the wash.
4413266047_3e4fda6c8b.jpg
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
As to accents (drift, it's not the US) in NZ I once met two great aunts who had emigrated there over forty years before and kept house together with the husband of one of them. One aunt spoke broad Kiwi, the other still spoke as one would expect of an English parson's daughter.

The strangest was a cousin in Wisconsin, brought up in Australia, spoke American but with Australian vowels. Weird.

In St Louis, Mo, visiting with another cousin, neighbours called - and stayed, I couldn't think why as they didn't say much, turned out they just wanted to listen to me and Mrs S.
 
Just want to come back to this question as the latest Matalan catalogue arrived in the post yesterday. The men's section all have svelte male models.

The women's section has a couple of pages like this:
View attachment 354242

I'm undecided whether that's a good thing though. Is it men in denial or a message to say it's ok for women to be fat but not men?
I didn't realise Twatalan sold tents and marquees.
 
As to accents (drift, it's not the US) in NZ I once met two great aunts who had emigrated there over forty years before and kept house together with the husband of one of them. One aunt spoke broad Kiwi, the other still spoke as one would expect of an English parson's daughter.

The strangest was a cousin in Wisconsin, brought up in Australia, spoke American but with Australian vowels. Weird.

In St Louis, Mo, visiting with another cousin, neighbours called - and stayed, I couldn't think why as they didn't say much, turned out they just wanted to listen to me and Mrs S.
My wife is a high school teacher and volleyball coach. The kids always want me to go into her class or the gym and "say something". Just to hear me speak. I really don't have a regional UK accent, other than it's "bath" not "barth", but I suppose it is sufficiently British that it's a novelty to the kids.

"Right you little cvnts, if she gives you homework, get it fvcking done, or it's a F. Capiche?" :)
 
As to accents (drift, it's not the US) in NZ I once met two great aunts who had emigrated there over forty years before and kept house together with the husband of one of them. One aunt spoke broad Kiwi, the other still spoke as one would expect of an English parson's daughter.

The strangest was a cousin in Wisconsin, brought up in Australia, spoke American but with Australian vowels. Weird.

In St Louis, Mo, visiting with another cousin, neighbours called - and stayed, I couldn't think why as they didn't say much, turned out they just wanted to listen to me and Mrs S.
Also on using accents in the US. My first holiday there, I struggled making the waitresss understand that we wanted water. Puzzled looks on the faces of the staff wherever we went.
Henceforth it was 'Wayder'
 

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