America - its all a bit odd...

Do you mind if I ask if you got two different vaccines from different providers?
They were both the same, but that was chance. They had two different vaccines in the vaccination centre that day and which vaccination station I ended up at was purely random. If I was a few places further ahead or a few places further back in the line I might have gotten a different one when the row I was in was marched from the waiting area to the vaccination stations.

A lot of the major political figures in Canada by the way, perhaps a majority of them, were vaccinated with either a vaccine the US didn't approve or with different first and second jabs, or both.
 
They were both the same, but that was chance. They had two different vaccines in the vaccination centre that day and which vaccination station I ended up at was purely random. If I was a few places further ahead or a few places further back in the line I might have gotten a different one when the row I was in was marched from the waiting area to the vaccination stations.

A lot of the major political figures in Canada by the way, perhaps a majority of them, were vaccinated with either a vaccine the US didn't approve or with different first and second jabs, or both.
Do you have your own anti vax movement up North?
Getting coworkers to get jabbed is like pulling Hens teeth, and the worst part is that the unhealthy are refusing the vaccine in droves and are the ones most likely to really need it.

I got the Moderna for both mine, and will see how it holds up over the next few weeks.
91F48DDD-D69D-4D44-9C53-9AE051DC91B0.jpeg
 
I read a news story today, it might have been in the CBC, which said that the reason that Biden was backtracking on opening the border was because it would cause diplomatic problems if he opened the border with Canada but not Mexico.

And the reason he doesn't want to open the border with Mexico is mainly due to domestic politics. Once the border with Mexico opens there is expected to be a flood of refugee claimants coming in from Central America. The Republicans are chomping at the bit to be handed this issue to slap Biden around with. So, the border stays closed for a while longer while Biden tries to figure out what to do next.

Personally I'm quite happy to see the American side of the border stay closed as at least it prevents idiot Canadians from driving down to places like Florida where the new zombie-apocalypse is reportedly on its way again courtesy of delta and Americans who think that vaccines are the work of the devil.
His problems on the southern border are of his own making. He opened his stupid mouth when he assumed office in January and invited the refugees from Central America to rush the border, because "he was the nice one". Un-huh. Flip answers to soft-ball questions from sympathetic news agencies will not cut it. We want to know NOW what he is going to do about the refugee problem. Sending his vice-president to Central America to wag her bony finger and admonish the leaders to just stop the people flow, didn't work out so good.
When You Need a Secod Asshole.jpg
 
Do you have your own anti vax movement up North?
Getting coworkers to get jabbed is like pulling Hens teeth, and the worst part is that the unhealthy are refusing the vaccine in droves and are the ones most likely to really need it.

I got the Moderna for both mine, and will see how it holds up over the next few weeks.
View attachment 590967
There are anti-vaxxers in Canada, but not to the extent there is in the US.

In the US part of the problem is that it has become an ideological issue, with people refusing to get vaccinated because of politics.

In Canada the political opposition (Conservatives, NDP, Greens, BQ, etc.) oppose the government, as that is their job, but say they would have gotten vaccination done faster and better. I can't understand why the opposition in the US didn't take the same approach.

I don't want to turn this thread into another COVID-19 discussion as there are already thread on that, so I'll try to just stick to the political and social issues related to it.

If I do a quick google for vaccination stats for Wyoming I get 40.9 per cent have had at least one jab and 36.2 per cent have had both. I believe that is percentage of total population. For the US as a whole it is 56.5 and 49.0. For first jabs Wyoming is at 72 per cent of the US average. Wyoming is fourth from the bottom in the US in terms of vaccination rate (counting first jabs).

If I look at Canada, the province with the lowest vaccination rate is Alberta, with 63.6 and 52.0 per cent for first and second jabs respectively. The national average is 70.0 and 52.8 respectively. For first jabs Alberta is within 91 per cent of the Canadian average.

So what is notable is that not only is the rate in Wyoming low, it is much further below the US national average than say the worst performing province in Canada is below the Canadian average (72 versus 91 per cent).

Now I could explain Alberta by saying that Jason Kenny is a f*cking idiot who couldn't organise a piss-up in a brewery, but what is the problem in your state? You like to say that you have a reasonably competent state government. What's the issue? To what extent do the state government see the vaccination job as "done" and to what extent do they see it as meaning they have a lot of hard work ahead of them.

In the area of Ontario where I am the emphasis is shifting from large mass vaccination centres to more mobile and temporary delivery systems. They feel that there are still a lot of people who want to get vaccinated but can't because of various problems getting in their way such as working hours, child care problems, transportation problems, etc. For example, when they do mobile vaccination clinics in rural areas using buses fitted out for the job they are still finding significant numbers of people coming in for their first jabs who for one reason or another haven't been able to make it to either a vaccination centre or drug store. They are also looking at going door to door in targetted neighbourhoods and things like that. They would like to get to a 90 per cent vaccination rate (of the eligible population), but understand that the last 10 per cent is going to be harder than the first 80 per cent.

I understand that as part of your job you deal with a fair number of "clients" who are not necessarily the cream of society. I suspect that a good number of these may not be vaccinated, and not because they are anti-vaxers, but rather because they can't get themselves organised to do anything constructive. For them to get vaccinated will require someone giving them enough of a push to overcome their natural inertia (the "I'll get around to it later syndrome").

What is the actual issue in your state with getting the job done? I doubt that the majority of people in Wyoming are afraid that vaccines are a plot by Bill Gates to inject 5G tracking chips into them. The real issue for some of them will be politics, and that is an issue for politicians to find a way to frame in an acceptable way.

I suspect though that there are very large numbers of people who face practical difficulties in getting around to it. For example you talk about how people in your state like community based amateur sport. Do your health authorities do things like set up vaccination stations at these sporting events and jab spectators on the spot? What about doing it at festivals and other occasions? What about getting children vaccinated before school starts. Do they offer to do the parents at the same time? They've been doing things like that in Canada and it does reach people who might otherwise not have bothered.

What is your opinion on this?
 
There are anti-vaxxers in Canada, but not to the extent there is in the US.

In the US part of the problem is that it has become an ideological issue, with people refusing to get vaccinated because of politics.

In Canada the political opposition (Conservatives, NDP, Greens, BQ, etc.) oppose the government, as that is their job, but say they would have gotten vaccination done faster and better. I can't understand why the opposition in the US didn't take the same approach.

I don't want to turn this thread into another COVID-19 discussion as there are already thread on that, so I'll try to just stick to the political and social issues related to it.

If I do a quick google for vaccination stats for Wyoming I get 40.9 per cent have had at least one jab and 36.2 per cent have had both. I believe that is percentage of total population. For the US as a whole it is 56.5 and 49.0. For first jabs Wyoming is at 72 per cent of the US average. Wyoming is fourth from the bottom in the US in terms of vaccination rate (counting first jabs).

If I look at Canada, the province with the lowest vaccination rate is Alberta, with 63.6 and 52.0 per cent for first and second jabs respectively. The national average is 70.0 and 52.8 respectively. For first jabs Alberta is within 91 per cent of the Canadian average.

So what is notable is that not only is the rate in Wyoming low, it is much further below the US national average than say the worst performing province in Canada is below the Canadian average (72 versus 91 per cent).

Now I could explain Alberta by saying that Jason Kenny is a f*cking idiot who couldn't organise a piss-up in a brewery, but what is the problem in your state? You like to say that you have a reasonably competent state government. What's the issue? To what extent do the state government see the vaccination job as "done" and to what extent do they see it as meaning they have a lot of hard work ahead of them.

In the area of Ontario where I am the emphasis is shifting from large mass vaccination centres to more mobile and temporary delivery systems. They feel that there are still a lot of people who want to get vaccinated but can't because of various problems getting in their way such as working hours, child care problems, transportation problems, etc. For example, when they do mobile vaccination clinics in rural areas using buses fitted out for the job they are still finding significant numbers of people coming in for their first jabs who for one reason or another haven't been able to make it to either a vaccination centre or drug store. They are also looking at going door to door in targetted neighbourhoods and things like that. They would like to get to a 90 per cent vaccination rate (of the eligible population), but understand that the last 10 per cent is going to be harder than the first 80 per cent.

I understand that as part of your job you deal with a fair number of "clients" who are not necessarily the cream of society. I suspect that a good number of these may not be vaccinated, and not because they are anti-vaxers, but rather because they can't get themselves organised to do anything constructive. For them to get vaccinated will require someone giving them enough of a push to overcome their natural inertia (the "I'll get around to it later syndrome").

What is the actual issue in your state with getting the job done? I doubt that the majority of people in Wyoming are afraid that vaccines are a plot by Bill Gates to inject 5G tracking chips into them. The real issue for some of them will be politics, and that is an issue for politicians to find a way to frame in an acceptable way.

I suspect though that there are very large numbers of people who face practical difficulties in getting around to it. For example you talk about how people in your state like community based amateur sport. Do your health authorities do things like set up vaccination stations at these sporting events and jab spectators on the spot? What about doing it at festivals and other occasions? What about getting children vaccinated before school starts. Do they offer to do the parents at the same time? They've been doing things like that in Canada and it does reach people who might otherwise not have bothered.

What is your opinion on this?
The vaccination effort was fairly well run IMO. Multiple locations were opened up in the bigger cities and towns, and the jabs are of course free of charge.

The problem is that many of my fellow residents do not trust the current vaccines we have on the market. Many are concerned about the side effects of the jab, and trust in the Federal government remains spectacularly low.


Some reading for you.

Now in the more populated counties like mine, the odds of being exposed to Covid are far greater than say living in Niobrara county. We have Frontier Days kicking off today, and this place will be packed with residents from all over the country. So it is not a matter of “if “one will be exposed, but “when”. So vaccination rates are a bit higher and many employers require it.

So e of the issues discussed in the article that might have been obstacles to vaccinations were technology issues for the older residents. So low tech methods were created so residents could schedule appointments. The elderly don’t have the familiarity with using a smart phone to make an appointment.

The other issue is the sense of “ rugged individualism” where many people are used to just riding the storm out. Which the fit will have a better chance at, while the not so fit are rolling the dice.

But the other interesting thing is that Colorado which is our Liberal opposite is also seeing a massive spike in the Delta as well.

But the concern now is how effective are the jabs we have now, against the strains are mutating at a rapid pace, and we have only way to find out.
 
Last edited:
San Francisco: "To hell with human shit on the sidewalks, crackheads laid out everywhere, and everything else going to hell, we're buying $20K designer trash cans!"

View attachment 590842

Here is an article I saw in the Washington Post couple of weeks back which frankly quite surprised me given their political leanings.

" Frankly, I don't know what it is about California, but we seem to have a strange urge to elect really obnoxious women to high office. I'm not bragging, you understand, but no other state, including Maine, even comes close. When it comes to sending left-wing dingbats to Washington, we're Number One. There's no getting around the fact that the last time anyone saw the likes of Barbara Boxer, Dianne Feinstein, Maxine Waters, Kamala Harris, and Nancy Pelosi, they were stirring a cauldron when the curtain went up on 'Macbeth'. The five of them are like jackasses who happen to possess the gift of blab. You don't know if you should condemn them for their stupidity or simply marvel at their ability to form words."

Maybe there's hope for California yet. Probably not, but it's possible.
 
Here is an article I saw in the Washington Post couple of weeks back which frankly quite surprised me given their political leanings.

" Frankly, I don't know what it is about California, but we seem to have a strange urge to elect really obnoxious women to high office. I'm not bragging, you understand, but no other state, including Maine, even comes close. When it comes to sending left-wing dingbats to Washington, we're Number One. There's no getting around the fact that the last time anyone saw the likes of Barbara Boxer, Dianne Feinstein, Maxine Waters, Kamala Harris, and Nancy Pelosi, they were stirring a cauldron when the curtain went up on 'Macbeth'. The five of them are like jackasses who happen to possess the gift of blab. You don't know if you should condemn them for their stupidity or simply marvel at their ability to form words."

Maybe there's hope for California yet. Probably not, but it's possible.
The British resolve their urges along those lines by paying a dominatrix to abuse them in private. It's probably cheaper that way.
 
" Frankly, I don't know what it is about California, but we seem to have a strange urge to elect really obnoxious women to high office. I'm not bragging, you understand, but no other state, including Maine, even comes close. When it comes to sending left-wing dingbats to Washington, we're Number One. There's no getting around the fact that the last time anyone saw the likes of Barbara Boxer, Dianne Feinstein, Maxine Waters, Kamala Harris, and Nancy Pelosi, they were stirring a cauldron when the curtain went up on 'Macbeth'. The five of them are like jackasses who happen to possess the gift of blab. You don't know if you should condemn them for their stupidity or simply marvel at their ability to form words."
Comedy gold, yet quite true. I'm surprised that you found it in the Washington Post as their usual editorial writers bear a strong resemblance to the Three Monkeys. Maybe there is hope for California after all.
Waffles in the Face of Danger.jpg
 
The vaccination effort was fairly well run IMO. Multiple locations were opened up in the bigger cities and towns, and the jabs are of course free of charge.
What about the people in smaller towns and rural areas? What is being done to actively go to them and make getting vaccinated as simple and quick as possible?

(...) The other issue is the sense of “ rugged individualism” where many people are used to just riding the storm out. Which the fit will have a better chance at, while the not so fit are rolling the dice. (...)
"Ride the storm out"? Are they under the impression that if they wait long enough the virus will get bored and go away? All of the scientific advice that I've seen has said that it is now so widespread that we will be living with COVID-19 forever. Areas with high vaccination rates and good public health systems may see it become locally extinct, but there will be repeated minor outbreaks due to travel.

In areas with low vaccination rates though it will be a regular and chronic problem.

It's not going away. There's no "ride it out".
 
The problem is that many of my fellow residents do not trust the current vaccines we have on the market. Many are concerned about the side effects of the jab, and distrust in the Federal government remains spectacularly low.

But the other interesting thing is that Colorado which is our Liberal opposite is also seeing a massive spike in the Delta as well.

You might want to amend what you typed in the first sentence.

With respect to the second sentence it is vaguely possible that the SARS-CoV-2 virus cares very little for your political divides.
 
You might want to amend what you typed in the first sentence.

With respect to the second sentence it is vaguely possible that the SARS-CoV-2 virus cares very little for your political divides.
Thank you for catching that.
I know the virus does not care, not into the whole anti vax gig. When the kids can get jabbed they are.
 
First the US imported covid, but nooo, that wasn’t good enough, they had to go for something more unique, monkeypox....
 
First the US imported covid, but nooo, that wasn’t good enough, they had to go for something more unique, monkeypox....
Let’s not forget the plague in Colorado.

Cases of the plague confirmed in Colorado, including in the death of a 10-year-old
 
Well,, I got my two jabs of Moderna in March, so as far as Uncle Sam is concerned, I'm good to go. Of course there's no guarantee that I will not contract the Covid-19 bug; the government said right there in the papers they gave each patient.

What is the Modera COVID-19 vaccine?

The Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine is an unapproved vaccine that may prevent COVID-19. There is no FDA approved vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

The FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine to prevent COVID-19 in individuals 18 years of age and older under an Emergency Use Authorization. (EUA)

Roll The Dice.

Blackie the Heavy Metal Cat and hiis Axe.jpg
 

Bubonic plague is endemic in western America (which quite surprised me).

Between 1900 and 2015, the United States had 1,036 human plague cases with an average of 9 cases per year. In 2015, 16 people in the Western United States developed plague, including 2 cases in Yosemite National Park. These US cases usually occur in rural northern New Mexico, northern Arizona, southern Colorado, California, southern Oregon, and far western Nevada
I was looking at comparative diseases when COVID arrived and the widespread presence of the plague surprised me greatly, having sort of assumed it vanished centuries ago.

A nice little outbreak of bubonic plague morphing into pneumonic plague would make COVID look like the mild sniffle the conspiraloons think it is (it affects all age groups equally and is 100% fatal if not treated quickly).

At least we now know how to deal with a pandemic. Don't we . . .
 
Bubonic plague is endemic in western America (which quite surprised me).

Between 1900 and 2015, the United States had 1,036 human plague cases with an average of 9 cases per year. In 2015, 16 people in the Western United States developed plague, including 2 cases in Yosemite National Park. These US cases usually occur in rural northern New Mexico, northern Arizona, southern Colorado, California, southern Oregon, and far western Nevada
I was looking at comparative diseases when COVID arrived and the widespread presence of the plague surprised me greatly, having sort of assumed it vanished centuries ago.

A nice little outbreak of bubonic plague morphing into pneumonic plague would make COVID look like the mild sniffle the conspiraloons think it is (it affects all age groups equally and is 100% fatal if not treated quickly).

At least we now know how to deal with a pandemic. Don't we . . .
Prairie Dogs and Squirrels.
 
Well,, I got my two jabs of Moderna in March, so as far as Uncle Sam is concerned, I'm good to go. Of course there's no guarantee that I will not contract the Covid-19 bug; the government said right there in the papers they gave each patient.

What is the Modera COVID-19 vaccine?

The Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine is an unapproved vaccine that may prevent COVID-19. There is no FDA approved vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

The FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine to prevent COVID-19 in individuals 18 years of age and older under an Emergency Use Authorization. (EUA)

Roll The Dice.

View attachment 591176

It looks like the FDA will give final approval to the vaccines sometime in September.
 

Latest Threads

Top