Amazon Kindle question

#1
I have an IPad MKI which I got mainly for the ebook ability (I have the Kindle app installed on the IPad) and web access as I do a fair bit of travelling and work in various shitholes. I live in Oz although when I buy stuff on Amazon (dvds mainly) I use the Amazon UK site on which I have an account with an Australian address.

When I browse the Amazon UK Kindle book store I get told that the titles on that site are for UK customers only and I get redirected to the Amazon site for Australian users where frankly the selection is not as good and the cost is dearer.

My question is: We are travelling to the UK in Sept/Oct will I be able to buy books off the Amazon UK site when I am physically in the UK or will I still be limited to the crap site? Anyone know?

Cheers.
 
#2
Not a definite answer but I should think if you change your address to a UK one, you should be ok.
 
#3
I have set up an account for kindle with a UK address and use it regularly from UAE, you have an option to download via USB which may solve your problem.

But as GM65 says if you have a UK account then it 'should' be easy.
 
#4
Thanks for the answers GM65 and S4S, I tried changing the address to my folks in the UK but the change was rejected as I assume that the credit card I used to set up the account is recognised as being linked to an Australian bank.

I am sure there is an easy way but am buggered if I know what it is. The definitive answer will be had when I visit blighted blighty later in the year.
 
#7
Yet another example of the way media companies are ******* idiots. The whole different prices for different parts of the world, varying availablity and so on is a hangover from the days when the only sort of book you got was made from dead trees. I have no doubt that Amazon have these limits forced on them by the rights holders. These days, for digital media, it makes no sense whatsoever. It inconveniences the honest - well, until they give up trying to force their money onto an unwilling bunch of dinosaurs and start to download stuff for free like everyone else.

Honestly, it's hard sometimes not to think rights holders are deliberately trying to make people stop paying them and pirate stuff.

Another top tip, if you do the right thing and buy stuff legally then sometimes the files are DRM'd which means you can't back them up, put them on another device and so on. It is not hard at all, following a bit of googling, to strip the DRM off and then you can do what you like with the files.
 

Auld-Yin

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#10
oots - I agree in part with what you are saying, but look at it from the publishers' POV. If they sell a book printed on dead trees then that is one copy and handing it round does not harm sales too much. If it is an electronic copy you can in theory buy one and then give free to the rest of the electrionic world so they are not too keen on the idea unless they can control it.

DRM is one way and like all security, can be side tracked by those with the savvy, but it does tend to delay the mass availability. Torrent sites and de-coding sites get round this at the moment but I bet the companies are working flat out to find a way of completely blocking so one copy stays with one person.

When someone buys a book they buy that copy, not the rights to send to hundreds of people. This must be a worrying time for publishers (don't really feel sorry as they have ripped off the punter for decades) as they don't know if they will have a business in a few years if they can't sell more than one copy of each book.

Just my opinion - everyone feel free to attack in the usual manner :)
 
#13
Cafe Creme... Do you 'like' all the posts, everywhere on Arrse? Seems like it.
 
#16
AY, can you explain why an ebook generally is the same price as the paper copy? Paying for a book isn't the issue, being charged an exorbitant price for the transfer of some digital information is. If I move house, I take all my belongings with me. If I change device, there is a likelihood that I'll have to repurchase the ebook. Cory Doctorow manages to sell books both as hard copies, and free downloads

Sent from my Desire HD
 
#17
oots - I agree in part with what you are saying, but look at it from the publishers' POV. If they sell a book printed on dead trees then that is one copy and handing it round does not harm sales too much. If it is an electronic copy you can in theory buy one and then give free to the rest of the electrionic world so they are not too keen on the idea unless they can control it.

DRM is one way and like all security, can be side tracked by those with the savvy, but it does tend to delay the mass availability. Torrent sites and de-coding sites get round this at the moment but I bet the companies are working flat out to find a way of completely blocking so one copy stays with one person.

When someone buys a book they buy that copy, not the rights to send to hundreds of people. This must be a worrying time for publishers (don't really feel sorry as they have ripped off the punter for decades) as they don't know if they will have a business in a few years if they can't sell more than one copy of each book.

Just my opinion - everyone feel free to attack in the usual manner :)
It's a perfectly reasonable point of view; it's just been overtaken by technology. All attempts to date to restrict the flow of digital files on the internet have failed, and - as long as people are allowed to do what they like with their PCs - this will not change. Ditto DRM, nothing has stopped people from stripping it off in fairly short order. Mass availability is the current reality, not a potential problem. Especially for books as the files are pretty small.

Indeed, the only people that suffer from DRM are those who pay money for a product. If companies had set out to train potential customers to give up and down load it for free they couldn't have done a better job than they are currently doing.
 
#18
Thanks for the answers GM65 and S4S, I tried changing the address to my folks in the UK but the change was rejected as I assume that the credit card I used to set up the account is recognised as being linked to an Australian bank. I am sure there is an easy way but am buggered if I know what it is. The definitive answer will be had when I visit blighted blighty later in the year.
Try creating a yahoo.co.uk or hotmail.co.uk email account, then opening an account with amazon.co.uk using that email account.
 
#19
AY, can you explain why an ebook generally is the same price as the paper copy? Paying for a book isn't the issue, being charged an exorbitant price for the transfer of some digital information is. If I move house, I take all my belongings with me. If I change device, there is a likelihood that I'll have to repurchase the ebook. Cory Doctorow manages to sell books both as hard copies, and free downloads

Sent from my Desire HD
There are several reasons for this. The main one is that the cost of printing and shipping a book is very low; for a paperback it can be as little as 50p a copy; the rest is overhead. This is everything from author royalties to all the various editorial, sales and marketing functions, which are the same for books as they are for ebooks.

This saving, small as it is, is offset by VAT, which is levied on ebooks but not on books, and by the fact that, contrary to popular belief, it does cost money to create and maintain an infrastructure for the delivery of ebooks. Add to this the reasonable expectation that publishing companies be allowed to turn a profit if people are to continue enjoying books of reasonable quality.
 
#20
The book will almost definately already be an electronic copy, there will be few writers who still use pen and paper. All the costs are already associated with the paper copy.

The infrastructure to disseminate the ebook isnt the publishers, it is the retailer, who likely already has it set up for the rest of their business. The retailer doesnt need to pay posting fees to send you the book, nor do they need valuable real estate storing it in suitable conditions, other than what their server's already utilise, buying the book can be a completely electronic transaction. The publisher charges the retailer 50p (as an example) for every electronic copy sold, and they then split the money up as appropriate.

The retailer hosts the book on their servers, and bangs a link up on their web page where they sell the book for £1. They make 50p on the book, almost all of which will be profit - their infrastructure and sales tool is already there.

The customer can either buy a book at a £1 after they have spent between £100 and (say) £500 getting a device to read the thing on, or they can spend £6.99 getting a hard copy. Their choice.

At the minute, the high costs of ebooks are what drives people into piracy. Surely its better to get a slice of that £1, than absolutely nothing? It has been succesfuly managed with Apple and their itunes store selling mp3's at 79p/ song against £15 for a CD, whats to stop ebooks working in a similar way?
 

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